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Guest UK Debt Slave

Question Time -29th June 2006

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Correct again ! I'm glad we agree on so much.

There are 3 topics which I think are important in this country.

Global warming

Pensions

Immigration

House prices

3 out of the 4 are regualarly discussed but the 4th one is not.

Seems to me the basic need of a roof over ones' head is an issue worth discussing!

Homelessness has been much, much higher in my lifetime than it it is now. Relatively speaking we don't have a huge problem re. "the basic need of a roof over ones' head"

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Guest mattsta1964

Correct again ! I'm glad we agree on so much.

There are 3 topics which I think are important in this country.

Global warming

Pensions

Immigration

House prices

3 out of the 4 are regualarly discussed but the 4th one is not.

Seems to me the basic need of a roof over ones' head is an issue worth discussing!

You are so spot on! Why is this issue so conspicuous by it's absence in the media? It's extraordinary. Which comes back to my paranoid ramblings earlier..................

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You are so spot on! Why is this issue so conspicuous by it's absence in the media? It's extraordinary. Which comes back to my paranoid ramblings earlier..................

Because there aren't many homeless people, and the level of owner occupation has never been higher.

Edited by Casual Observer

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Homelessness has been much, much higher in my lifetime than it it is now. Relatively speaking we don't have a huge problem re. "the basic need of a roof over ones' head"

And Yes, we do have a huge problem.

Lots of my younger friends are still living at home and some of them are in their late 20's or 30's.

ok they are not 'homeless' in the strict sense of the word, but this IS having a negative impact on their lives.

I'm not saying everyone has a right to OWN their own home but there isn't even council housing any more.

A freind of mine (28 yrs old) was told by the council that the only way she would get a council flat would be to

get pregnent !

Only a few years ago she would have been able to buy a small flat, or get a council flat.

She would have had some quality of life.

Both her parents are dead.(so she cannot live with them)

She can't afford to rent.

She is still living with her sisters (and family).

And god knows there are many more in the same position.

I even know of a couple of 50 + who's marriages have split up and have moved back with parents as there was not

enough equity after their divorces to buy their own home. This was in fact highlighted in press last week.

Unfortunately these people do not show up on the 'homeless' statistics.

Edited by GAL BEAR

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Yes, we do have a huge problem.

Lots of my younger friends are still living at home and some of them are in their late 20's or 30's.

ok they are not 'homeless' in the strict sense of the word, but this IS having a negative impact on thier lives.

I'm not saying everyone has a right to OWN their own home but there isn't ever council housing any more.

a freind of mine (28 yrs old) was told by the council that the only way she would get a council flat would be to

get pregnent !

Only a few years ago she would have been able to buy a small flat. She would have had some quality of life.

But prices are falling - I've just been told that on this thread.

You see, they have to fall for people to be able to afford to buy them. That's why there isn't a huge problem, because the market is correcting itself, like it always does.

So, what about the UK attacking Iraq, is that now a bigger, more interesting issue?

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But prices are falling - I've just been told that on this thread.

You see, they have to fall for people to be able to afford to buy them. That's why there isn't a huge problem, because the market is correcting itself, like it always does.

So, what about the UK attacking Iraq, is that now a bigger, more interesting issue?

Yes, its good that that is dicussed obviously, but all I am saying is there are things in this country that need sorting out.

After all, the young would be FTb's in this country are not responsble for TB attacking Iraq so why should their problems not

be discussed ?

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Guest mattsta1964

Yes, we do have a huge problem.

Lots of my younger friends are still living at home and some of them are in their late 20's or 30's.

ok they are not 'homeless' in the strict sense of the word, but this IS having a negative impact on thier lives.

I'm not saying everyone has a right to OWN their own home but there isn't ever council housing any more.

a freind of mine (28 yrs old) was told by the council that the only way she would get a council flat would be to

get pregnent !

Only a few years ago she would have been able to buy a small flat. She would have had some quality of life.

One thing that has struck me about the young generation today is their frightening apathy. Young people were much more proactive both culturally and politically back in the 60's, 70's and 80's. There were the huge upheavals in the 60's, the peace movement and equal rights. Then we had the anger of the 70's, punk etc, the Anti Thatcherite years in the 80's but since the 90's, young people seem to be too bloody quiet! I think the harsh realities of being a student, hideously in debt by the time they graduate and the ever more oppressive demands put on young people to get post graduate qualifications in order to guarantee a reasonably well paid job have totally destroyed their appetite to fight for a more just, equitable society. Today, the 20's generation are really struggling to have any hope of enjoying a stake in our country's future. The apex of British pop culture is reduced to listening to yer Coldplay album whilst contemplating how you are gonna pay off your 25K student debt. Tragic! Where are the Johnny Rottens of the country. We need that kind of rage to precipitate some changes in our society.

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Guest Alright Jack

Engage VENT SPLEEN MODE

It's official!

Question Time is an utter load of ******. The headline programme for political debate in the UK is a laughing stock

Dimbleby! I'd kick your **** up to your shoulder blades If I had the chance

The headline issue last night on Question TIme was regarding The Scottish minister's remarks about England's progress in the World Cup. Meanwhile, 42% of people's take home salaries are soaked up paying off mortgages and 100,000s people are priced out of the market altogether.

I am absolutely fuming about this and I'm gonna do my Angry of Tunbridge Wells bit and write to the Beeb to tell what I think.

SPLEEN VENTED

VENT SPLEEN MODE DISENGAGED

Don't get mad get even.

Take all your money out of the bank and exchange for real money.

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Yes, its good that that is dicussed obviously, but all I am saying is there are things in this country that need sorting out.

After all, the young would be FTb's in this country are not responsble for TB attacking Iraq so why should their problems not

be discussed ?

IMO, one of the problems in this country is that so many youngsters want to live on their own, and buy a house on 1 salary.

In the past you would saty with mum and dad until you were about 23, then get married and rent, then buy, a house.

This is a social change that the market has not yet caught up with.

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Guest mattsta1964

Don't get mad get even.

Take all your money out of the bank and exchange for real money.

Errrr.....You've lost me here. You mean sell up?

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One thing that has struck me about the young generation today is their frightening apathy. Young people were much more proactive both culturally and politically back in the 60's, 70's and 80's. There were the huge upheavals in the 60's, the peace movement and equal rights. Then we had the anger of the 70's, punk etc, the Anti Thatcherite years in the 80's but since the 90's, young people seem to be too bloody quiet! I think the harsh realities of being a student, hideously in debt by the time they graduate and the ever more oppressive demands put on young people to get post graduate qualifications in order to guarantee a reasonably well paid job have totally destroyed their appetite to fight for a more just, equitable society. Today, the 20's generation are really struggling to have any hope of enjoying a stake in our country's future. The apex of British pop culture is reduced to listening to yer Coldplay album whilst contemplating how you are gonna pay off your 25K student debt. Tragic! Where are the Johnny Rottens of the country. We need that kind of rage to precipitate some changes in our society.

I agree with all that. My generation stopped a war, changed society, changed fashion every 5 years and produced great music.

We'd all love to be younger, but I have to say that people of my age (52) were teenagers at the best of all times.

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IMO, one of the problems in this country is that so many youngsters want to live on their own, and buy a house on 1 salary.

In the past you would saty with mum and dad until you were about 23, then get married and rent, then buy, a house.

This is a social change that the market has not yet caught up with.

Unfortunatley the way things are going they will live with Mum & Dad until Mum & Dad die (and inherit their home!)

That is unless the house gets sold to pay for MUm & Dad' care home and then they REALLY will be homeless as the

government/council won't re-house anyone over 16 yrs old !

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I agree with all that. My generation stopped a war, changed society, changed fashion every 5 years and produced great music.

We'd all love to be younger, but I have to say that people of my age (52) were teenagers at the best of all times.

The problem is your generation didn't pay enough social security, the government got the calculations wrong. So we, the younger generation will be left to pay the shortfall. House prices are just another form of wealth redistribution from the young to the old. The problem for your generation is that people are becoming increasingly resentful of this, and sentiment will change sooner or later.

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Guest mattsta1964

The problem is your generation didn't pay enough social security, the government got the calculations wrong. So we, the younger generation will be left to pay the shortfall. House prices are just another form of wealth redistribution from the young to the old. The problem for your generation is that people are becoming increasingly resentful of this, and sentiment will change sooner or later.

Absolutely spot on. The honey pot is already empty. I'll be screwed when I'm a pensioner. I can't afford a decent pension and I hardly imagine the younger generation will be able to afford to support me when I can't work anymore. How much can you tax people to pay for this stuff before people just say enough is enough? My parents generation were the lucky ones. They had the best capitalism had to offer. All timing innit!

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The problem is your generation didn't pay enough social security, the government got the calculations wrong. So we, the younger generation will be left to pay the shortfall. House prices are just another form of wealth redistribution from the young to the old. The problem for your generation is that people are becoming increasingly resentful of this, and sentiment will change sooner or later.

Well lets hope it happens sooner rather than later !

Young people must be more pro-active and start demonstrating (peacefuly of course).

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Guest grumpy-old-man

I agree with all that. My generation stopped a war, changed society, changed fashion every 5 years and produced great music.

We'd all love to be younger, but I have to say that people of my age (52) were teenagers at the best of all times.

Hi CO, you must be a bit saddned to see the way the country & it's culture has changed, eroded away. The wife & myself always say that it must be even worse for the war veterans getting mugged for £2 on the way to the post office.

Why do we not respect our elders in this country ?

why do we appear to be so different (culturely) to countries only just over the water, France & Spain ?

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These 2 points are contradictory again!

If prices are falling, albeit slowly, how will we reach the point when only judges will be able to afford a 1-bedder??

Ok facts then. My argument to support the fact that housing is unaffordable

1. The market is made of 7.8% of first time buyers compared with over 50% 5 years ago. This infers that FTBs can no longer get on the ladder.

2. The average age of the FTB is 35 years old suggesting that it takes longer for salaries to rise and for a deposit to be saved than in previous generations where the average age of the FTB was much lower.

3. Mortgage payments now equate to the peak of the last boom in the late 80s/early 90s at 42%.

4. Mortgage debt accounts for over £1trillion which is equal to the GDP of the UK. This suggests that the people who ARE buying houses now are over stretching themselves using equity from previous house purchases to fund current purchases.

5. The average house price to average earning is greater than at any other time in history.

I say that house prices are falling because the only survey I believe is the Land Registry figures. This link should explain why.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3132863.stm

Those figures show regional falls with prices largely rising in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

So these are the facts. All you keep coming back with is chirpy cockney nonsense, clever one off quips trying to put me down and nothing but anecdotal evidence to support your weak argument. If you want to make me listen, do some work and find some figures to convince me.

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House prices are just another form of wealth redistribution from the young to the old.

Only if your generation are daft enough to pay high prices for them!

If you want to make me listen, do some work and find some figures to convince me.

Owner occupation has never been so high in percentage terms. That means prices aren't as unaffordable as you claim. Prices are still rising, that means they've not reached a level that's to high yet, taking into account the starting point IRs.

Hi CO, you must be a bit saddned to see the way the country & it's culture has changed, eroded away. The wife & myself always say that it must be even worse for the war veterans getting mugged for £2 on the way to the post office.

Why do we not respect our elders in this country ?

why do we appear to be so different (culturely) to countries only just over the water, France & Spain ?

I really don't know why, and it saddens and depresses me.

Just a little thing, but every night I travel home from work on the train, there are youngsters sitting there with their feet on the opposite seat. If I'm feeling brave or angry enough I tell them to get them off. Most seem not to understand why I think there's a problem with this.

Somewhere along the line the younger generation lost respect for others.

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Only if your generation are daft enough to pay high prices for them!

As has been said here the percent of first time buyers is falling fast. So our generation is becoming less daft!

At the moment many of the people buying are either from overseas (especially in London), or BTL (despite yields of 2-3%). Unfortunately most people don't read the warning with all investments, "past performance is not a indicator of future performance". As houses have become more of an investment, I personally believe this will make prices more volatile. At the first sign of prices going down the investors will panic and sell, leading to further falls.

According to the VIs HPI is now about 5% year on year and slowing. With wage inflation at 4%, the idea that if I don't get on the housing ladder now I never will is just lies.

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According to the VIs HPI is now about 5% year on year and slowing. With wage inflation at 4%, the idea that if I don't get on the housing ladder now I never will is just lies.

I agree. I would urge all FTBs to wait.

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Absolutely spot on. The honey pot is already empty. I'll be screwed when I'm a pensioner. I can't afford a decent pension and I hardly imagine the younger generation will be able to afford to support me when I can't work anymore. How much can you tax people to pay for this stuff before people just say enough is enough? My parents generation were the lucky ones. They had the best capitalism had to offer. All timing innit!

L216252020 - Governance, Regulation and Social Security in Britain and France: Historical Perspectives

Ageing populations and public expenditure constraints have highlighted the issue of pension insecurity both in the UK and other EU countries. A study at Warwick University demonstrates that the long established British strategy of finding a private solution to a public problem has protected the public finances at the cost of pension security. Using a comparison with French social protection over the last fifty years, it concludes that state regulation of ostensibly private pensions destroys public accountability and confines policy development to the tiny minority of experts who alone understand the complexities of growing legal requirements. In the UK, this has not guaranteed pensions nor restored dwindling public confidence. Focusing on pension governance, not pension funding, the study compares the strategic policy priorities of British and French governments following the first pensions crisis of the late 1950s. It aims to identify the types of public-private partnership required to offer secure and effective pension provision. The findings emphasise the importance of collective decision-making and democratic administration in the governance of occupational pensions. They reveal the complex forms of public and private provision that have developed as continental labour law has underwritten and reshaped occupational schemes. They also show the dominance of investment strategies and associated economic priorities in determining UK policy, to the detriment of public understanding and participation in pension debates.

It's all a cycle, house prices, pensions, hipster jeans,

all been seen once (weep,wail,what to do?) & will be seen again.

Of course it was OK for them, it was different then!

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Affordable enough for people to be buying lots and lots of them?

Lots of people are committing to buy, that is certainly true but until something has been paid for I think it is a bit premature to say that it is affordable. Looking at the level of unsecured personal debt and mortgage arrears even at historically low interest rates I would conclude that many, many cannot afford their homes.

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Nonsense - I do not.

Now, let's keep our peckers up and 'ave a nice cup of Rosy.

"Roll out the barrel"

Lets face it you're a bit of a sad fu*ker, 52 years of age (I'm 55) and you feel the need to come on here simply to wind the youngsters up, and gloat a little.

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Owner occupation has never been so high in percentage terms.

Actually..

1. The percentage of the properties themseleves that is actually owned is lower than it was some 50 years ago

2. The amount owed on mortgages is at an all time high (Just passed 1trillion GBP, I think)

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  • 316 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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