Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Realistbear

4.3 Million People Have Moved Back In With Parents

Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/arti...in_page_id=1770

Finances 'forcing many to live with parents'

01:00am 26th June 2006

Adults are being forced to move back in with their parents
due to rising house prices and soaring levels of debt
, research showed today.

An
estimated 4.3 million single people aged between 25 and 50 have moved back to the family
home after being unable to afford to live alone, according to dating firm Parship.com.

What a country Mr. brown has created with his HPI-MEW "Miracle." :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest grumpy-old-man

This also makes me ask myself....who the hell is buying / renting all the one BR flats?????

BTL bitches, wiv der black (the new platinum I believe) credit cards & 4x4's wiv personal plates....init ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.3 million does seem an awful lot. Still, I suppose a dating firm would know. They'd all be signed up. I certainly wouldn't be interested in having a girlfriend who still lived with her parents!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its not just moving back home, the young are also sharing more. Living 3 or 4 to a house, i know of couples who now live in shared houses...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.3 million does seem an awful lot. Still, I suppose a dating firm would know. They'd all be signed up. I certainly wouldn't be interested in having a girlfriend who still lived with her parents!

Men are more likely to live at home than women, with 26 per cent of single men living with their parents, compared with just 15 per cent of women. Tony Blin-Stoyle, UK director of Parship.co.uk, said: "For many singles, particularly between the ages of 25 and 50, renting never mind buying a property is just a pipe dream
.

:o

its not just moving back home, the young are also sharing more. Living 3 or 4 to a house, i know of couples who now live in shared houses...

Just before I left the biggest bubble market in the US, Southern California, many houses were being bought by up to 4 families. Usually non-Anglo such as Vietnamese, Chinese, Mexican, Samoan. You could usually tell by the huge number of vehicles parked in the driveway and on the lawns. It seems Anglos have a harder time living with family in one house.

When you think about it, HPI has been a curse on the land with the only beneficiaries being the government first: death taxes increasing, stamp duty increasing, cgt on investment properties. Followed by the EAs and mortgage companies charging gross fees, even to "exit" a loan. And of course, the thousands of shylocks out there preying on the desperate. The average homeowner suffers if they want to move up--or down. And millions of young people are deprived of a reasonable chnace to buy a home due to the HPI-MEW policies of the government What a scam. And Gordon has the affrontary to call this a "Miracle Economy?" Good thing he didn't get away with his SIPPs disaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hold on a moment there; 'buying is a pipedream' I can get on board with, but renting? Even when I worked less than twenty hours a week in a video store it was just about enough to cover the rent. Lazy little sods!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.3 million does seem an awful lot. Still, I suppose a dating firm would know. They'd all be signed up. I certainly wouldn't be interested in having a girlfriend who still lived with her parents!

Oh dear! :o

I hope it doesn't work the other way round!

C'mon girls, could you date a chap who lives with his mum, albeit on a temporary basis?

Edited by redwing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/arti...in_page_id=1770

Finances 'forcing many to live with parents'

01:00am 26th June 2006

Adults are being forced to move back in with their parents
due to rising house prices and soaring levels of debt
, research showed today.
An
estimated 4.3 million single people aged between 25 and 50 have moved back to the family
home after being unable to afford to live alone, according to dating firm Parship.com.

What a country Mr. brown has created with his HPI-MEW "Miracle." :blink:

Isn't this just the pendulum swinging towards re-alignment.

Not so many years ago living with parents while married with children & saving for a home was not uncommon. I'm not that old & I remember this with clarity.

Then was the age of delusional grandeur, where I have a 'right' to enjoy NOW the benefits my parents have taken years to attain.

Of course 'living beyond my means' is a phrase uncommon to many young pretenders because of their 'right' to material possessions.

Back to earth with a bit of a realistic bump now ennit?

I guess the scary thing is that if totaliterian rule is not applied then it proves how effective it is, as so many make a balls up of free choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this just the pendulum swinging towards re-alignment.

Not so many years ago living with parents while married with children & saving for a home was not uncommon. I'm not that old & I remember this with clarity.

Then was the age of delusional grandeur, where I have a 'right' to enjoy NOW the benefits my parents have taken years to attain.

Of course 'living beyond my means' is a phrase uncommon to many young pretenders because of their 'right' to material possessions.

Back to earth with a bit of a realistic bump now ennit?

I guess the scary thing is that if totaliterian rule is not applied then it proves how effective it is, as so many make a balls up of free choice.

So we know what we're talking about, how old are you and/or when was this period of married couples with children living at their parents? And what dates do you assign to this period of "delusional grandeur"? Without more information it's hard to know what you have in mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this just the pendulum swinging towards re-alignment.

Not so many years ago living with parents while married with children & saving for a home was not uncommon. I'm not that old & I remember this with clarity.

Then was the age of delusional grandeur, where I have a 'right' to enjoy NOW the benefits my parents have taken years to attain.

Of course 'living beyond my means' is a phrase uncommon to many young pretenders because of their 'right' to material possessions.

Back to earth with a bit of a realistic bump now ennit?

I guess the scary thing is that if totaliterian rule is not applied then it proves how effective it is, as so many make a balls up of free choice.

Some real truth in this. We may well be going back to a poorer, more realistic, society where people did not own homes until later in life and where most people were "poor" in the sense that a nice detached home was a luxury as was a new or newish car. It is ironic but Gordon's miracle may turn out to be a true miracle after all. How to turn the clock back 40 years to where not everyone enjoyed the privileges so many enjoy today. A true divide between rich and poor with the middle squeezed on both sides. Well done Gordon you canny Scot you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.3 million does seem an awful lot. Still, I suppose a dating firm would know. They'd all be signed up. I certainly wouldn't be interested in having a girlfriend who still lived with her parents!

Why ever not? It is very important to find out straight away what might be in the inheritance pipeline. Face it, you ain't getting a house no other way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why ever not? It is very important to find out straight away what might be in the inheritance pipeline. Face it, you ain't getting a house no other way.

Gordon has got this one covered too. Inheritance taxes will make sure that houses are NOT passed down but have to be sold to pay the taxes. Its a miracle don't you know. :lol::lol::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't this just the pendulum swinging towards re-alignment.

Not so many years ago living with parents while married with children & saving for a home was not uncommon. I'm not that old & I remember this with clarity.

Then was the age of delusional grandeur, where I have a 'right' to enjoy NOW the benefits my parents have taken years to attain.

Of course 'living beyond my means' is a phrase uncommon to many young pretenders because of their 'right' to material possessions.

Back to earth with a bit of a realistic bump now ennit?

I guess the scary thing is that if totaliterian rule is not applied then it proves how effective it is, as so many make a balls up of free choice.

I'm in my 50s. Mates of mine that got married young - say in their early 20s (after they had finished an apprenticeship and moved onto 'proper' money) moved straight away into 2 bed terraces or even 3 bed semis. In those days planning the wedding revolved as much around the moving in date for a house as it did booking the church.

I do recall a few people of my elder brother's age (mid 60s now) getting married and staying with one or other of the in-laws, but this was always a temporary affair while they saved up for their deposit on a house. In those days, HPI did not mean saving was pointless.

Gordon has got this one covered too. Inheritance taxes will make sure that houses are NOT passed down but have to be sold to pay the taxes. Its a miracle don't you know. :lol::lol::lol:

It's beginning to look more like a high-wire act every day. And with a bloke as fat as Gordo, I wouldn't like to be around when he comes off.

Good point on the inheritance tax - so you are looking for a girl living with very elderly parents in a house worth the inheritance tax threshold. It is, obviously, important that she has no siblings.

I can feel another web site coming on. £50 subscription sound fair?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some real truth in this. We may well be going back to a poorer, more realistic, society where people did not own homes until later in life and where most people were "poor" in the sense that a nice detached home was a luxury as was a new or newish car. It is ironic but Gordon's miracle may turn out to be a true miracle after all. How to turn the clock back 40 years to where not everyone enjoyed the privileges so many enjoy today. A true divide between rich and poor with the middle squeezed on both sides. Well done Gordon you canny Scot you!

You have to appreciate - as I've had to - that different groups in society have very different experiences. My parents and grandparents, and most of their contemporaries, are/were professional middle class - doctors, teachers, academics, civil service, research scientists. The university-educated middle classes benefitted enormously from social change and upward mobility in the late 50s through to the mid 70s. My parents and their contemporaries bought three-bed semis straight after university and went into solid, secure, well-paid professional careers with fantastic final-salary pension schemes.

As a child we lived in houses that would now be £300k-£750, as did ALL the children I played with. It was normal. We lived in a nice middle-class part of a city in the home counties which is now in the top handful of places in the UK for house prices (second house, first was a three-bed semi in Scotland). Sure, my mother was shrewd, but this was done on an academic's salary - my father lectured at Imperial. My mother didn't work. They had three children, a car, a record player, went on holiday every year (albeit not abroad). We had a garden, a dog, and a horse. You'd need to earn well over £100k pa now to live the life my parents lived in the late 60s. And no, they didn't inherit any money.

My parents and many of their contemporaries went in for competitive house buying. Where they live there is a finely-graded awareness of the desirability of streets. My parents moved to their third house, within a mile of their second, to move up the ladder. Our neighbours moved twice, less than a mile each time, to climb the ladder. Those who didn't do this were looked down on. You mortgaged yourself to the hilt, took the pain for a couple of years, and then planned the next move, ever onward and upward.

With hindsight it was a golden age for middle-class professionals. There is no way you could lead the life we (as children) took for granted now on less than £100k pa; and even then it wouldn't be possible without significant inflation. People used to get annual increments based purely on age and experience -remember that?

Your experiences may well be different, but certainly my experiences are that I do not relate in any way to this idea that people now are better off. Sure, my car may be more reliable and my stereo better and I have a computer - but my parents bought a three-bedroom new build at age 27/25 with two kids in tow and a third on the way on a university lecturer's salary. Where's the comparison?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we know what we're talking about, how old are you and/or when was this period of married couples with children living at their parents? And what dates do you assign to this period of "delusional grandeur"? Without more information it's hard to know what you have in mind.

My folks lived with parents & us as kids in early 60s till they could afford to live independantly & I & wife & kids lived with parents in mid 70s till we had enough saved in 'bottom drawer' to comfortably dwell in rented accomodation.

I wasn't by any means considered a pauper, but could not afford a telephone or my own washing machine or my own car!

I wasn't a laughing stock among my friends as they were mostly in the same position.

Things only really improved on a personal level in late 70s due to inflation, but due to short time working this caused I had to work a part time job as well to maintain my improved standard.

It was difficult to get into debt due to tight controls.

I have nothing in mind , just stating that sharing ones assets with close family is not a social crime, was perfectly acceptable till recently, is still considered perfectly acceptable in many parts of the world, including to a lot of our migrant workforce, has only been deferred from because of false economy based on unaffordable borrowing, & now this period has passed the return to families sharing is not an event to be frowned upon, rather accepted as a state that maybe should never have been removed from initially.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My folks lived with parents & us as kids in early 60s till they could afford to live independantly & I & wife & kids lived with parents in mid 70s till we had enough saved in 'bottom drawer' to comfortably dwell in rented accomodation.

I wasn't by any means considered a pauper, but could not afford a telephone or my own washing machine or my own car!

I wasn't a laughing stock among my friends as they were mostly in the same position.

Things only really improved on a personal level in late 70s due to inflation, but due to short time working this caused I had to work a part time job as well to maintain my improved standard.

It was difficult to get into debt due to tight controls.

I have nothing in mind , just stating that sharing ones assets with close family is not a social crime, was perfectly acceptable till recently, is still considered perfectly acceptable in many parts of the world, including to a lot of our migrant workforce, has only been deferred from because of false economy based on unaffordable borrowing, & now this period has passed the return to families sharing is not an event to be frowned upon, rather accepted as a state that maybe should never have been removed from initially.

Wish you'd make your mind up. In another thread you were doing a Norman Tebbitt and telling people to get on their bikes to find lower priced housing. Which is it to be? Live with your parents until they die and you inherit their house (tricky in many modern houses not big enough to f@rt comfortably in) or move away to an area with cheaper housing and no well-paid jobs?

So, 4.3 MILLION of you sent home to live with ma and pa - under their roof with their rules etc.

Who has bought all the flats and houses you should have bought?

Bloody hell, think what might happen if you got narked about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in my 50s. Mates of mine that got married young - say in their early 20s (after they had finished an apprenticeship and moved onto 'proper' money) moved straight away into 2 bed terraces or even 3 bed semis. In those days planning the wedding revolved as much around the moving in date for a house as it did booking the church.

I do recall a few people of my elder brother's age (mid 60s now) getting married and staying with one or other of the in-laws, but this was always a temporary affair while they saved up for their deposit on a house. In those days, HPI did not mean saving was pointless.

It's beginning to look more like a high-wire act every day. And with a bloke as fat as Gordo, I wouldn't like to be around when he comes off.

Ain't this the whole point, get married, save, buy a house, live with others to achieve this, get settled first, have family.

How many singles were in your social circle getting educated till 22 or thereabouts, then gaining single home ownership, as has been their 'right' for some time now.

Added to this, when your mates got married, what had they as 'luxuries', electrical goods, furnishings etc. probably nowhere near as much as is now considered a 'right' to enjoy I'd guess.

How many BTL did you know.

Isn't it cheap credit & delusional grandeur that has fuelled the 'in those days' talk as if it were ancient history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to appreciate - as I've had to - that different groups in society have very different experiences. My parents and grandparents, and most of their contemporaries, are/were professional middle class - doctors, teachers, academics, civil service, research scientists. The university-educated middle classes benefitted enormously from social change and upward mobility in the late 50s through to the mid 70s. My parents and their contemporaries bought three-bed semis straight after university and went into solid, secure, well-paid professional careers with fantastic final-salary pension schemes.

As a child we lived in houses that would now be £300k-£750, as did ALL the children I played with. It was normal. We lived in a nice middle-class part of a city in the home counties which is now in the top handful of places in the UK for house prices (second house, first was a three-bed semi in Scotland). Sure, my mother was shrewd, but this was done on an academic's salary - my father lectured at Imperial. My mother didn't work. They had three children, a car, a record player, went on holiday every year (albeit not abroad). We had a garden, a dog, and a horse. You'd need to earn well over £100k pa now to live the life my parents lived in the late 60s. And no, they didn't inherit any money.

My parents and many of their contemporaries went in for competitive house buying. Where they live there is a finely-graded awareness of the desirability of streets. My parents moved to their third house, within a mile of their second, to move up the ladder. Our neighbours moved twice, less than a mile each time, to climb the ladder. Those who didn't do this were looked down on. You mortgaged yourself to the hilt, took the pain for a couple of years, and then planned the next move, ever onward and upward.

With hindsight it was a golden age for middle-class professionals. There is no way you could lead the life we (as children) took for granted now on less than £100k pa; and even then it wouldn't be possible without significant inflation. People used to get annual increments based purely on age and experience -remember that?

Your experiences may well be different, but certainly my experiences are that I do not relate in any way to this idea that people now are better off. Sure, my car may be more reliable and my stereo better and I have a computer - but my parents bought a three-bedroom new build at age 27/25 with two kids in tow and a third on the way on a university lecturer's salary. Where's the comparison?

The comparison.... You didnt go to university and earn more than an office worker, you complain and dont declare all your income...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish you'd make your mind up. In another thread you were doing a Norman Tebbitt and telling people to get on their bikes to find lower priced housing. Which is it to be? Live with your parents until they die and you inherit their house (tricky in many modern houses not big enough to f@rt comfortably in) or move away to an area with cheaper housing and no well-paid jobs?

So, 4.3 MILLION of you sent home to live with ma and pa - under their roof with their rules etc.

Who has bought all the flats and houses you should have bought?

Bloody hell, think what might happen if you got narked about it.

You can play at 'The Waltons' then move away, would probably want to after all that time together.

Must say I agree about the 'their rules' catch, but as previously discussed, have to make sacrifices to attain the required social standing.

Who gonna buy all the flats & houses, sounds like a recipe for HPC don't it?

No reason to get narked, sit back, wait for it to all happen again. Beatific :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can play at 'The Waltons' then move away, would probably want to after all that time together.

Must say I agree about the 'their rules' catch, but as previously discussed, have to make sacrifices to attain the required social standing.

Who gonna buy all the flats & houses, sounds like a recipe for HPC don't it?

Not at all, they have all been bought and let out - presumably to young people not in the 4.3 million group.

No reason to get narked, sit back, wait for it to all happen again. Beatific :)

That's it, let it all float over you. Things will get better in the future .... be calmmmmm ..... deep breaths now ...... slow exhalations ..... everything will be okay if you are just patiennnnnnnnnt ..... ahhhhhhh ...... good boy ..... nowwwwww WHERE'S THE RENT SUCKER!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ain't this the whole point, get married, save, buy a house, live with others to achieve this, get settled first, have family.

How many singles were in your social circle getting educated till 22 or thereabouts, then gaining single home ownership, as has been their 'right' for some time now.

Added to this, when your mates got married, what had they as 'luxuries', electrical goods, furnishings etc. probably nowhere near as much as is now considered a 'right' to enjoy I'd guess.

How many BTL did you know.

Isn't it cheap credit & delusional grandeur that has fuelled the 'in those days' talk as if it were ancient history.

Credit ain't cheap, it is just being bought as if it were

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4.3m you say

Thats about how many immigrants goverment has let in over the past coulpe of years, 120k pa is nothing like the truth and thats why we are in such as mess when it comes to houses as it fulled the boom in BTL in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.