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frugalista

Moving Back To Britain

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Hey folks,

As some of you may know, I've been living in the US pretty much all the time I've been on the forum. It is the second time I have lived abroad. It has been fun and interesting but things have moved on at work and in my personal life so it turns out I'll be moving back to the UK in September. Luckily, I have a good job lined up (I got an internal transfer).

I am looking forward to returning to Britain. Some of you might moan about Britain and be looking to emigrate, but you'll be surprised how much it means to be back in the country where you grew up.

Anyway, I will be renting to begin with, but keeping a close eye on the property market in my chosen destination city....

frugalista

Edited by frugalista

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Hey folks,

As some of you may know, I've been living in the US pretty much all the time I've been on the forum. It is the second time I have lived abroad. It has been fun and interesting but things have moved on at work and in my personal life so it turns out I'll be moving back to the UK in September. Luckily, I have a good job lined up (I got an internal transfer).

I am looking forward to returning to Britain. Some of you might moan about Britain and be looking to emigrate, but you'll be surprised how much it means to be back in the country where you grew up.

Anyway, I will be renting to begin with, but keeping a close eye on the property market in my chosen destination city....

frugalista

Hey Frugalista, best of luck with your move. I have been in the USA for 5 years now and plan on moving back with wife and kid next year.

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Hey Frugalista, best of luck with your move. I have been in the USA for 5 years now and plan on moving back with wife and kid next year.

cheers mate, I will tell you how it goes when I finally am settled again. I think this is my 5th relocation in 10 years!

frugalista

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Good luck on the move. I moved back last year after living in the US for several years off and on with the last stretch 1991-2005 (San Diego mostly). For me it was for work reasons and the "rhythm of life" that I never quite found in the US. Things like the countryside, McVities Chocolate biscuits, the humour, the National Trust, better tasting food, M & S, somewhat safer environment crime-wise, the coming HPC.

That said, if house prices do not fall by at least 30% and if the US $ does not rise significantly against sterling we may move back again as England is hellishly expensive. Next time we may try Virginia--somewhere in the Shenandoah Valley near Charlottesville. Fabulous detached houses around $300k--triple that for the same thing in a similiar area in the UK

Things I do not like about the UK:

1. Overpriced housing

2. Appalling November through February darkness and cold.

3. Speed cameras

4. Parking cost

Things I did not like about the US:

1. Lack of interesting places to visit--a general sameness wherever you go

2. Sense of insecurity in most cities due to levels of violent crime

3. Bland food and restaurants

4. Not much room for individuality

5. Harsh weather everywhere except San Diego!

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

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It really won;t matter where you live in the next decade. There will be a ********** and those who are mobile and without debt will be able to take their pick of where to live.

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Hey folks,

As some of you may know, I've been living in the US pretty much all the time I've been on the forum. It is the second time I have lived abroad. It has been fun and interesting but things have moved on at work and in my personal life so it turns out I'll be moving back to the UK in September. Luckily, I have a good job lined up (I got an internal transfer).

I am looking forward to returning to Britain. Some of you might moan about Britain and be looking to emigrate, but you'll be surprised how much it means to be back in the country where you grew up.

Anyway, I will be renting to begin with, but keeping a close eye on the property market in my chosen destination city....

frugalista

Why come back? It is worse than ever. :(

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

I was a lawyer for quite a few years, mostly in the UK with just a dabble in the US. What I found coming BACK to the UK to look at law again was how similar it has become to the US. Workaholism is just as bad with the almighty "pound" overriding quality of life. Willingness to "stretch" things to make a bit of extra money was also present as it was in the US. Law in the UK is now, like it is in the US, purely a business and no longer a "profession." The profession I left in the UK in 1991 is vastly different to the profession I found coming back to it last year. I have since left the law again to do something totaly different. So in that sense I would say the UK and the US are not much different.

My daughter is still in the US and works for a multi-national drug company. Vacations are 2 weeks and you work a nine hour day -- 8-5. Other than that I doubt if working in the UK would be much different.

I have got to know quiote a few high level US managers through my brother-in-law and the majority love it here in the UK and do not want to return to the US. I suspect there is a sligthly less "dog eat dog" atmosphere in business in the UK with a greater tolerance for individulaity. My brother-in-law will probably retire with his US company here in the UK as he does not want to return to the US head office. He loves the pubs, the soccer, being able to sit out in the garden in the evenings without being eaten by mosquitoes and having the variety of Europe in close proximity. Much the same reasons I am back.

Its a rhythm of life thing. Some Brits I know in the US love it there but I found I had less in common with those than with the Brits who missed England. I suppose you have to ask yorself what is important in life. My wife is American and she loves England but hates the fact that she can't have a "nice" home due to the overpriced housing in the UK. I feel that way too and if things don't change in the UK fairly soon there is a 50% chance we may return stateside.

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4. Not much room for individuality

This is the point I have made about America many times.

I find Americans are far more inclined to group - think and group - speak than us.

You are either part of the in - crowd or a bum.

Im amazed at thier 'were the good guys' John Wayne simplistic thinking. Very few would ever think about the terrible life some kids have had that lead them a - stray, they would just conclude 'hes a bad guy, period'.

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

I loved America. I worked as an engineer over there in 2001. True the work ethic is pretty intense. You start off with a couple weeks leave and get a day for every year you work there generally. It made me realise just how many rights we have here in Europe. They have naff all. If you get a good job health insurance comes with the job but otherwise you have to pay for it yourself. I never really got to grips with the health system over there. I was working on secondment so it didn't affect me. Engineers get paid a fortune so it is tempting. I have to say I didn't notice any real difference in crime. I lived in Denver CO. Scene of the infamous Columbine school massacre. But generally on the whole I felt safer. If I was going to live abroad in that area of the world, Canada would have to be my choice. All the benefits of the USA with a British attitude and sense of humor (see what I did there) and if you feel homesick there is the face of dear old Queenie (as in Elizabeth not Freddy Mercury) to keep you comapny. Girls are hot too.

Frugalista. Welcome home. Whoever he is he missed out on a top bird!

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i lived in texas for 8 years. it was ok, but in the end it was all work and little else. so i came back.

this place is bummed at the moment. id suggest canada as above.

american chicks are all teethy...

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i lived in texas for 8 years. it was ok, but in the end it was all work and little else. so i came back.

this place is bummed at the moment. id suggest canada as above.

american chicks are all teethy...

What I did find in the US was that teeth were generally in much better shape than in the UK. You often see people smiling here with a mouth full of dogends which is not too nice. On the other hadn, I do not like the Simon Cowell "whiter than white" look with teeth that seems popular in the US where appearance is much more highly esteemed than here.

I lived in Texas for about 3 years and did not like it. I can understand why Stevie Ray Vaughn wrote those two great Texas Blues numbers: Can't Stand the Weather and It's Floodin Down in Texas. Apart from the most violent weather in the world (our house got bombed with grapefruit sized hail one year and we just missed a hideous tornado the next) the "culture" is bland and consists of little more than BBQ, Pick-up trucks and mall walking to get out of the heat. A good place to work though if you are a workaholic as there is precious little to see and do unless you travel hundreds of miles. Austin is really the only decent place to live in TX, IMO.

Edited by Realistbear

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Things I do not like about the UK:

3. Speed cameras

You can do something about that. Get a Road Angel - I did and I can't tell you how relaxed I am driving now without having to think about where the next camera is.

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

Where I work in the US I get 4 weeks holiday and it's a very positive work environment. That's probably not very typical though.

For many average workers, wages are slightly higher in the UK right now, due to the record strong pound. For low paid jobs the UK wages are much higher. It is really for high-paid jobs where the US wages are higher. Cost of living in the US is generally lower, again this is really just down to the exchange rate.

frugalista

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Guest Bart of Darkness
3. Bland food and restaurants

Interesting as that's one of the main things the Americans mention about the UK, poor food (along with the teeth!)

When I finally go to America, that's one of the things I plan to "investigate" (so to speak).

Let us know what you think of the place when you get back frugalista. Exactly how long have you been away?

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Interesting as that's one of the main things the Americans mention about the UK, poor food (along with the teeth!)

When I finally go to America, that's one of the things I plan to "investigate" (so to speak).

Let us know what you think of the place when you get back frugalista. Exactly how long have you been away?

Just under 2 years, so not that long really. Food is generally better in the UK, but that is probably my personal predjudice as I am used to British food.

I think the "poor food" stereotype comes from the 1940s - 1970s when many things were not available in the UK. This is now out of date.

frugalista

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Just under 2 years, so not that long really. Food is generally better in the UK, but that is probably my personal predjudice as I am used to British food.

I think the "poor food" stereotype comes from the 1940s - 1970s when many things were not available in the UK. This is now out of date.

frugalista

Yup. Americans that visit us are in awe of the variety of stuff you find in the typical Tescos. 10 different chutneys, 26 different marmalades, huge varieties of bread and racks full of the world's best chocolate and biscuits--and tea.

You can get good stuff in the US though but you have to avoid the generic supermarkets and go to farmer markets and stores like Trader Joes that sell a lot of European stuff cheaply.

I would have missed the US Number 1 store had they not opened up in the UK: Costco. There is one in Birmingham near where I live and in 10 or so other locations. Believe me, this store is wonderful with the best food at wholesale prices. 35 pounds membership which is nothing compared with the huge savings. Meat is all restaurant quality and they even sell Omega watches! We buy 90% of our meat from Costco and the quality and price is far beyond Tesco or any other generic store.

When I first visted the UK after a long absense about 3 years ago I thought everything was too expensive. 3 years on and prices are levelling with the States thanks to (?) Chinese tat. Not sure about the quality though. The one thing that remains outrageous is car prices. A new Audi A4 here is over 23k pounds whereas in the States the same thing costs about 27k in dollars.

http://www.costco.co.uk/

I love Costco so much I must get some shares.....................................

They also pay the highest wages in the industry :)

Edited by Realistbear

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

Hi, it depends where you work really - the working lifestyle is hectic in the North East, at most you will qualify for 2 weeks vacation a year and a few personal days.

The really bad thing about America is there is no universal health insurance. Case in point - I took my daughter to the emergency room a few months ago for a high fever, we had insurance but still paid the $50 copay.

When we got the bill, which showed us the breakdown, the cost for a 4hr stay in an ER room was

$2, 500. This is what we would have had to pay if we had no insurance.

There is definitely more pressure, but again, it depends on where you work. I work as an editor for a UK competition newsletter, and although there is pressure, we can dress casual and there are down times occasionally.

Having less free time DOES impact the quality of life, which is why we try to go somewhere every other weekend.

As it is, my wife and I plan on moving back to the UK next year or the following year. I do miss blighty.

If you do decide to move to the USA, there is a lot to do and see, but it depends on your interests. I enjoy hiking and there are good places to visit, for example, upstate New York, Pennsylvania.

Best of luck!

Yup. Americans that visit us are in awe of the variety of stuff you find in the typical Tescos. 10 different chutneys, 26 different marmalades, huge varieties of bread and racks full of the world's best chocolate and biscuits--and tea.

You can get good stuff in the US though but you have to avoid the generic supermarkets and go to farmer markets and stores like Trader Joes that sell a lot of European stuff cheaply.

I would have missed the US Number 1 store had they not opened up in the UK: Costco. There is one in Birmingham near where I live and in 10 or so other locations. Believe me, this store is wonderful with the best food at wholesale prices. 35 pounds membership which is nothing compared with the huge savings. Meat is all restaurant quality and they even sell Omega watches! We buy 90% of our meat from Costco and the quality and price is far beyond Tesco or any other generic store.

When I first visted the UK after a long absense about 3 years ago I thought everything was too expensive. 3 years on and prices are levelling with the States thanks to (?) Chinese tat. Not sure about the quality though. The one thing that remains outrageous is car prices. A new Audi A4 here is over 23k pounds whereas in the States the same thing costs about 27k in dollars.

http://www.costco.co.uk/

I love Costco so much I must get some shares.....................................

They also pay the highest wages in the industry :)

Interesting info about Costco - we live near one, although I never buy stuff from there because we are only a family of three.

It's great for large families but we don't require things in bulk yet.

We mainly frequent ShopRite (which I call ShopTite as it's expensive), Stop'n'Shop (which sells some UK food under "Irish" section) and PathMark (which I don't like much)

I was a lawyer for quite a few years, mostly in the UK with just a dabble in the US. What I found coming BACK to the UK to look at law again was how similar it has become to the US. Workaholism is just as bad with the almighty "pound" overriding quality of life. Willingness to "stretch" things to make a bit of extra money was also present as it was in the US. Law in the UK is now, like it is in the US, purely a business and no longer a "profession." The profession I left in the UK in 1991 is vastly different to the profession I found coming back to it last year. I have since left the law again to do something totaly different. So in that sense I would say the UK and the US are not much different.

My daughter is still in the US and works for a multi-national drug company. Vacations are 2 weeks and you work a nine hour day -- 8-5. Other than that I doubt if working in the UK would be much different.

I have got to know quiote a few high level US managers through my brother-in-law and the majority love it here in the UK and do not want to return to the US. I suspect there is a sligthly less "dog eat dog" atmosphere in business in the UK with a greater tolerance for individulaity. My brother-in-law will probably retire with his US company here in the UK as he does not want to return to the US head office. He loves the pubs, the soccer, being able to sit out in the garden in the evenings without being eaten by mosquitoes and having the variety of Europe in close proximity. Much the same reasons I am back.

Its a rhythm of life thing. Some Brits I know in the US love it there but I found I had less in common with those than with the Brits who missed England. I suppose you have to ask yorself what is important in life. My wife is American and she loves England but hates the fact that she can't have a "nice" home due to the overpriced housing in the UK. I feel that way too and if things don't change in the UK fairly soon there is a 50% chance we may return stateside.

Interesting thoughts Realist Bear. In my case, I am one of those that prefer England to the USA. My wife doesn't want to move to England, but she'll try it out. We agreed that we would spend time in each other's homeland before making the big decision. I came over here in 2001. Took a lot of adjustments, although many things are the same.

I miss the pubs, soccer and my family of course.

I only get one week a year as I am working for a relatively new company.

Edited by drhewitt

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Guest Bart of Darkness

Nice link there Realistbear, I clicked on it to find that Costco are opening a store in Sheffield on the 28th June.

Excellent timing. :)

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Good luck with the move back. I worked in various countries and always loved them. Always nice to get a change of scenery. I even loved Chicago in winter (people there are nice and friendly!).

Interesting to see so many professionals on this board too :)

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Hey folks,

As some of you may know, I've been living in the US pretty much all the time I've been on the forum. It is the second time I have lived abroad. It has been fun and interesting but things have moved on at work and in my personal life so it turns out I'll be moving back to the UK in September. Luckily, I have a good job lined up (I got an internal transfer).

I am looking forward to returning to Britain. Some of you might moan about Britain and be looking to emigrate, but you'll be surprised how much it means to be back in the country where you grew up.

Anyway, I will be renting to begin with, but keeping a close eye on the property market in my chosen destination city....

frugalista

One word of advise. The grass is always greener somewhere else.

I lived in Germany for 1 year, then back to the UK for 2 years, then moved to Italy for 2 years, then finally moved to the USA 15 years ago, where I am now.

I go back to the UK a couple of times a year for 2 to 3 weeks at at time - I am actually going there next week to watch the end to the World Cup with my brothers.

My standard of living is superior than any of my siblings in the UK. I have a 3,300 sqft home in the states on 1/2 acre. My mortgage was paid off 5 years ago as I took out a 10 yr fixed mortgage. Having no mortgage allows me to do a lot more with my spare time - like going to the UK often.

My brothers on the other hand have mortgages that frighten the hell out of me. One of my brothers who lives in Romford has a 160K GBP mortgage on a 3 bed terraced house which would could probably fit it my games room. He is also one speeding ticket away from losing his license and his job, because his job requires a valid driving license.

I love the UK, that is why I go back often. I miss all things british - like walking round car boot sales in the mud - but the cost of living there is ridiculous right now. The 2% inflation rate is a joke.

My brother, who is also an Engineer, told me that if interest rates go up by 2% he has to sell his place and move into rented accomodation.

Good luck anyway...

Edited by Pluto

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I lived in the Netherlands then the Middle East (Oman) for three and a half years. I loved aspects of both places, but in both cases it was clear I would always be an outsider, so you miss out on being part of a national culture. I enjoyed endless sunshine and heat at first, but quickly tired of it.

When I came back to the UK the first thing I noticed were unexpected changes - every curry house had become a Balti house, new catch phrases and in-jokes were baffling and disturbing. I enjoyed rain and clouds for at least a year before I got sick of them and started remembering the Mid East fondly!

Have seen, heard and read about the states my whole life, and having recently done my first flying visit (Utah), my impression is that the place is so big and varied that evry Brit could probably find their ideal place in US society somewhere.

I also suspect that if I found the tiny corner where I felt at home, I wouldn't much enjoy going to the other parts.

Basically I'm a Brit, and I only fit into Brit society properly.

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Hi,

I just wanted to ask some questions to those of you who’ve moved from the U.K and lived in the U.S for a while. I was thinking about emigrating over to the U.S in a couple of years time to experience a change of lifestyle before I (eventually) settle down, and also the chance to earn a bit more money (I’ve been told engineers do quite well over there, compared with Britain). What do you guys think about the working lifestyle out there? Is it a similar work ethic to Britain or would you say there’s more pressure/stress? Also, I’ve heard the holidays aren’t as good over there (in the region of two weeks annual leave?), have you found that having less free time has decreased your quality of life or is it something that you just get used to? I’d be very interested in hearing any opinions.

Cheers!

Why don't you try Canada (where I'm from)? More laid-back than the US, a lot safer, marginally better holidays, and a really great (and affordable) quality of life. Canadians are also more skeptical than Americans (regarding most things). And no yobbism!

A tip - Make sure to buy PROPER winter clothing! :D

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It's weird reading this thread as I'm a transplanted American -- 17 years in London. Now America is the place where the shows and in jokes are no longer familiar (until the shows come on UK TV anyway). It will always be home in certain ways (my folks live there) but England is my home as far as i'm concerned.

My parents are always feeling sorry for me that i have a lesser standard of living than they did/do and this is likely to continue if HPI doesn't do a big nose dive soon. But for all that, i'll stay with the NHS (if the wretched Gov't doesn't privatise it first!) and good long holiday entitlements as well as the culture.

B)

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More laid-back than the US, a lot safer,

I believe you'll find that Canadian murder rates are about the same as American if you cut out the US inner-city drug war zones and prisons where murder rates are over 100 per 100,000. I can't vouch for other crimes.

Certainly there are states in America with lower murder rates than those typical of mainland Europe. Generally they seem to be the rural ones with lots of guns and few drug gangs doing drive-bys in turf wars.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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