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DoubleBubbleTrouble

Aberdeen University Launch Study Into Effects Of High House Prices

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Priced Out has been contacted by Dr John Bone and Dr Karen O'Reilly of the University of Aberdeen regarding a new sociological study "On the Treadmill".

The study is researching the effect that unprecedented house price increases will have on the current group of 18-40 year olds in the UK, as well as record debt levels and global labour market changes. Their angle is that policy makers have largely ignored the obvious effects these massive social changes will have.

They would like to hear from anyone currently affected by or concerned about any of these issues... even if it's simply to say you are concerned about property prices but expect a crash will sort out the situation.

We've set up a simple contact form, please pop by and put your email address in and share any opinions you have on the topic.

Find out more...

Edited by DoubleBubbleTrouble

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Well done.

How many members do you have now at Priced Out?

Do you get much action - are people emailing their MPs with their concerns etc.

I am a bit puzzled by this. I would have thought that by word of mouth (on MySpace etc.) you would have been bombarded with members all keen to take some sort of positive action.

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The U of A report is due to be published at about the same time as the HPC bottoms out. It will all be academic by then <_<

At least Brown will have a legacy, albeit a negative one, as the Boom and Bust Chancellor who believed in econmic miracles.

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Priced Out has been contacted by Dr John Bone and Dr Karen O'Reilly of the University of Aberdeen regarding a new sociological study "On the Treadmill".

The study is researching the effect that unprecedented house price increases will have on the current group of 18-40 year olds in the UK, as well as record debt levels and global labour market changes. Their angle is that policy makers have largely ignored the obvious effects these massive social changes will have.

They would like to hear from anyone currently affected by or concerned about any of these issues... even if it's simply to say you are concerned about property prices but expect a crash will sort out the situation.

We've set up a simple contact form, please pop by and put your email address in and share any opinions you have on the topic.

Find out more...

Wow! This is exactly my bug bear with the whole situation, the impact high house prices are having on this age group, myself included. I'm currently writing to Vincent Cable of the Lib Dems as he's my MP and he wrote this article so has a good handle on the problems faced with the growing debt;

Personal view: Forget Prudence. We're drowning in debt, Mr Brown

By Vince Cable (Filed: 07/03/2006)

http://portal.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.j.../07/ixcoms.html

Britain's last decade of growth has been driven by consumer spending. There have been tangible benefits in rising living standards and falling unemployment. But there is a nasty sting in the tail: a growing level of household indebtedness which, for many, is not sustainable.

Indeed, retail spending trends suggest growing nervousness, as is borne out again today by another set of weak British Retail Consortium sales figures.....But it is recklessly irresponsible of some banks to be lending at six times peoples' incomes in an environment where there are significant downside risks to the economy and bad debts are growing.

I am 30 years old, earn above average age and have been saving a lot the last 5 years by sleeping in the living room of a 1-bed flat etc. Doing this sort of thing (in SW London) has been the only way to have money left over to save. And yet after 5 years of solid saving, whilst I've saved a lot comparing what I've saved to car prices, LCD TV prices etc, I've saved hardly anything comparing it to house prices. It's only 15% of a 1-bed flat where I live which means I still can't afford the mortgage. And I don't want a 1-bed flat, I'm looking to settle down, start a family etc, I require a 2-3 bed flat or house for this but they are simply out of reach.

And yet around the country the boomers suck up more of the property available. My parents family home was bought as a 2nd home - empty for 95% of the year, my parents current house is about to be bought as a holiday home, the house opposite my nan is empy for 95% of the year as was bought as a holiday home. And these are the bl**dy nimbys that are, due to cr*p planning procedures in this country preventing more housing being built in their areas. I've seen it first hand. Where my nan lives in Devon on a small cul de sac they are all retired, from the SE etc. 10 new houses are being built at the entrance to the cul de sac but the protestations that went up were incredible.

The boomers own a massive majority of the housing wealth and are the only ones that can afford the family sized homes in this country now and so many are simply left vacant. If there are people that can afford more than 1 family sized home when they don't even have families and then there are those that can't afford 1-bed flats who do have families there is something seriously seriously wrong.

We've set up a simple contact form, please pop by and put your email address in and share any opinions you have on the topic.

Find out more...

Your comments box doesn't wrap the text that I just posted in it.

Edited by munimula

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I have taken the opportunity to submit some of my views, but there is a problem with the form. The enter command on the text box submits the form, and in the absence of text wrap, beginning a new paragraph or bullet point etc leaves you sat with a lot more to say and a 'thank you' message. Might be worth looking at as my submission will probably make little sense without the context I was planning to add on the next line.

Cheers

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How many members do you have now at Priced Out?

We've doubled to over 200 hundred registered members.

I am a bit puzzled by this. I would have thought that by word of mouth (on MySpace etc.) you would have been bombarded with members all keen to take some sort of positive action.

We could do with a lot more word of mouth... we get a steady stream of people in but it's growing very slowly. Please feel free to mention us to all and sundry!

Do you get much action - are people emailing their MPs with their concerns etc.

Unfortunately most people seem to be happy to passively consume rather than do anything about it. It's a major source of frustration since it doesn't take a huge amount of people to make some sort of impact. Still at least if they are passively consuming the message is getting across.

The Priced Out and How Much Richer calculators have been extremely popular though. Hopefully changing home owners opinions up and down the country!

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I have taken the opportunity to submit some of my views, but there is a problem with the form. The enter command on the text box submits the form, and in the absence of text wrap, beginning a new paragraph or bullet point etc leaves you sat with a lot more to say and a 'thank you' message. Might be worth looking at as my submission will probably make little sense without the context I was planning to add on the next line.

Cheers

Sorry, you can email soc231@abdn.ac.uk with the rest of the info! I'll fix the form!

UPDATE: Should be fixed now, apologies for the inconvenience!

I'll sack the testers... hang on I'm unemployed already ;-) I guess that's why!

Edited by DoubleBubbleTrouble

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The U of A report is due to be published at about the same time as the HPC bottoms out. It will all be academic by then <_<

At least Brown will have a legacy, albeit a negative one, as the Boom and Bust Chancellor who believed in econmic miracles.

It may come out after the fact, or it may not. Do as Pascal would and bet both sides.

Plus even post-crash, debt levels will persist as will global labour market changes. And then's the spectre of the next House Price Boom and Crash.

It's time policy makers woke up to this and it's time we started holding them to account for the unholy mess that's happened on their watch.

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It's about blummin time everyone woke up to this. I can't believe it's taken so long for someone to do some serious research on it.

Unless of course there has been government and industry research which hasn't been made public...

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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