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Realistbear

House Price Crash Momentum Is Already Building

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A reality check from the Land Registry's latest Quarterly figures for the Bulls on a Sunday Morning, and a little encouragment for the wavering Bears:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/in_d...tml/region1.stm

Northumberland £149,225 -8.8%

Cumbria £143,851 -1.6%

Tyne And Wear £132,526 -0.3%

Stockton-On-Tees £128,643 -5.0%

Darlington £125,556 -5.6%

Durham £114,329 -4.3%

Redcar And Cleveland £109,289 -11.2%

Middlesbrough £108,982 4.7%

Hartlepool £98,770 -5.2%

Cheshire £185,036 -1.6%

Warrington £156,929 -4.5%

Greater Manchester £134,935 -2.1%

Merseyside £132,854 0.3%

Lancashire £128,806 -1.9%

Halton £127,289 -5.3%

Blackpool £119,112 2.8%

Blackburn With Darwen £98,762 -2.1%

Herefordshire £208,672 2.2%

Worcestershire £184,936 -3.3%

Warwickshire £184,860 -3.4%

Shropshire £184,664 -3.1%

Staffordshire £161,232 -0.1%

West Midlands £146,903 0.3%

Wrekin £140,819 1.2%

Stoke-On-Trent £89,910 -5.6%

Rutland £228,672 -7.7%

Leicestershire £170,145 -3.5%

Northamptonshire £158,537 -3.5%

Lincolnshire £147,659 -1.9%

Nottinghamshire £146,871 -2.0%

City Of Derby £137,082 -0.3%

Leicester £134,130 0.3%

City Of Nottingham £119,797 -5.2%

As the most recent Quarterly official figures from the LR show, this party is just get started!

London may be doing okay--while the equity markets do well and brokers etc. have full employment (not for much longer)--but its grim Upnorth as the figures from the LR show.

PS Wales and Scotland are doing nicely also:

Isle Of Anglesey £145,033 -12.2%

Neath Port Talbot £102,936 -2.6%

Rhondda Cynon Taff £93,453 -2.7%

Merthyr Tydfil £89,920 -4.8%

Blaenau Gwent £82,491 -7.4%

East Renfrewshire 168,132 -8.8%

East Dunbartonshire 160,331 -8.6%

East Lothian 152,826 -7.5%

Stirling 144,367 -4.0%

Scottish Borders 130,622 -7.9%

Aberdeenshire 127,195 -3.4%

Highland 125,711 -3.4%

Glasgow City 124,370 -0.6%

Argyll And Bute 119,923 -5.9%

East Ayrshire 92,883 -10.3%

Orkney Islands 88,463 -10.3%

West Dunbartonshire 88,299 -7.4%

Eilean Siar 75,640 -8.2%

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/shared/spl/hi/in_d...tml/region1.stm

Edited by Realistbear

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That's funny, I thought the papers were saying that the prices of houses had gone up by 7%. Are you suggesting that the true situation is more complex than that?

I'm willing to bet there are lots of people in the regions where prices went down by a sizeable chunk who are insufferably smug about how much they think the value of their home went up.

Billy Shears

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Guest Riser

Dead Link either a typo or the BBC must have pulled it :ph34r:

404 - Page Not Found

This might be because you typed the web address incorrectly. Please check the address and spelling ensuring that it does not contain capital letters or spaces.

It is possible that the page you were looking for may have been moved, updated or deleted.

Please click the back button to try another link.

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Guest grumpy-old-man

realistbear:

your title "Things especially grim Upnorth"

you could use that as a general statement (not just about house prices) every year ;)

julka, cheers for the link....very useful

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Is that the latest link? It says "Last Updated: Monday, 8 May, 2006, 16.30 GMT 17.30 UK"

If I'm not mistaken the data is updated quaterly. If March numbers were online on 8th of May we may expect next portion of soothing news in the beginning of August.

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Don’t forget that these LR figures on the BBC website are reported NSA for the period Jan-Mar/06 and, being lagging, reflect the slower and seasonally quiet market during Nov/05-Jan/06. The quartlerly changes would reflect a slowdown at the end of 2005.

So, to a large extent, thay actually *pre-date* the spring bounce that’s set things fizzing again this year – you can see the effects of including the more recent data in the May/06 FT HPI-MA index as this aims to provide a timely estimate and eventual mirror the laggy LR data.

Edited by spline

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So, to a large extent, thay actually *pre-date* the spring bounce that’s set things fizzing again this year – you can see the effects of including the more recent data in the May/06 FT HPI-MA index as this aims to provide a timely estimate and eventual mirror the laggy LR data.

But the "spring bounce" is set against slower seasonal rises in prices. These figures are showing virtual across the board falls. So how are these numbers going to get into the public domain to reverse sentiment which seems stubbornly fixated on limitless price growth?

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Guest wrongmove

Don’t forget that these LR figures on the BBC website are reported NSA for the period Jan-Mar/06 and, being lagging, reflect the slower and seasonally quiet market during Nov/05-Jan/06. The quartlerly changes would reflect a slowdown at the end of 2005.

So, to a large extent, thay actually *pre-date* the spring bounce that’s set things fizzing again this year – you can see the effects of including the more recent data in the May/06 FT HPI-MA index as this aims to provide a timely estimate and eventual mirror the laggy LR data.

And they are not mix adjusted, so they may just mean that FTB/BTL property is selling quicker than more expensive houses.

Haven't we seen this data once or twice before..... :unsure::rolleyes::lol:

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And they are not mix adjusted, so they may just mean that FTB/BTL property is selling quicker than more expensive houses.

Haven't we seen this data once or twice before..... :unsure::rolleyes::lol:

True enough I remember looking at Anglesey data last year - flats up 24% in one quarter but only about 6 sold (presumably all in some BTL paradise).

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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