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Bbc - More Debt Stories...

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BBC Story

home credit industry, where average interest rates are 177%.

Bit steep :o:o

Shiralee lives on the Batchley Estate in Redditch, West Midlands, where one in every ten residents has a serious debt problem.

OMFG. 1 in 10 in serious debt :o:o

Britain has a £1.1 trillion binge borrowing problem.

BBC, I a glad you have finally noticed. :lol::lol:

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I do not have any sympathy for these sort of people - they are living beyond their means - simple.

People on benefit can afford to live. She is probably getting free rent and pays no CT. She has a council house (secure accomodation). She will have benfits each week plus child allowance. This is adeqaute to live on (pay the bills etc). It is not enough to buy Nike trainers, playstation etc - but neither should it be.

One of the things about being on benefit is that it is a very secure, fixed income. You know exactly what you are going to get each week and it is pretty much gauranteed.

If she has taken out loans she knows she can't afford to pay that is her problem.

Don't get me wrong - I am a strong supporter of the welare state. I don't think that single parents or anyone else who can't work should be living in poverty. There are aslo vulnerable people living on benefits who I have sympathy with e.g single people, people in private rented accommodation and people trying to work (part time etc) who have terrible problem living on the margins of the benfit system.

But someone with a secure council house and guaranteed income who gets into that amount of debt in this day and age has made some pretty poor decisions.

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I do not have any sympathy for these sort of people - they are living beyond their means - simple.

People on benefit can afford to live. She is probably getting free rent and pays no CT. She has a council house (secure accomodation). She will have benfits each week plus child allowance. This is adeqaute to live on (pay the bills etc). It is not enough to buy Nike trainers, playstation etc - but neither should it be.

One of the things about being on benefit is that it is a very secure, fixed income. You know exactly what you are going to get each week and it is pretty much gauranteed.

If she has taken out loans she knows she can't afford to pay that is her problem.

Don't get me wrong - I am a strong supporter of the welare state. I don't think that single parents or anyone else who can't work should be living in poverty. There are aslo vulnerable people living on benefits who I have sympathy with e.g single people, people in private rented accommodation and people trying to work (part time etc) who have terrible problem living on the margins of the benfit system.

But someone with a secure council house and guaranteed income who gets into that amount of debt in this day and age has made some pretty poor decisions.

Yeah but Chavetta just has to have the latest Nike trainers to hang around at the bus stop!

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Guest Guy_Montag

I like the previous one, £45k in debt through online gambling during maternity leave.

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I do not have any sympathy for these sort of people - they are living beyond their means - simple.

People on benefit can afford to live. She is probably getting free rent and pays no CT. She has a council house (secure accomodation). She will have benfits each week plus child allowance. This is adeqaute to live on (pay the bills etc). It is not enough to buy Nike trainers, playstation etc - but neither should it be.

One of the things about being on benefit is that it is a very secure, fixed income. You know exactly what you are going to get each week and it is pretty much gauranteed.

If she has taken out loans she knows she can't afford to pay that is her problem.

Don't get me wrong - I am a strong supporter of the welare state. I don't think that single parents or anyone else who can't work should be living in poverty. There are aslo vulnerable people living on benefits who I have sympathy with e.g single people, people in private rented accommodation and people trying to work (part time etc) who have terrible problem living on the margins of the benfit system.

But someone with a secure council house and guaranteed income who gets into that amount of debt in this day and age has made some pretty poor decisions.

I agree to some extent, if you are in a position where your house is paid for and you get a set amount of money per week benefit then you should be able to manage a budget. But the problem here I suspect is a lack of education - I really do think that something needs to be done about the doorstep lenders - an average interest rate of 600% FFS.

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One thing to bear in mind is that most of these people never aspire to home ownership.

And your point is?

And this helps them how when the loan shark is going to break their kneecaps?

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I do not have any sympathy for these sort of people - they are living beyond their means - simple.

Christ.

"These sort of people" -- listen to yourself. It could be you one day.

Sure some of them are taking on debts that they shouldn't be. But some of them are people like the women Martin Lewis talked about on mse: she'd had her benefits stopped for two weeks & as a result had gone down into a spiral of ever increasing debt. When it's your offspring who need food and your benefits haven't been paid, what are you going to do?

You talk about "living beyond their means" as if its some kind of moral failing. For some people it can be a matter of putting food on the table, or paying the bus fare so their kids can get to school.

Phil

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Of course we all know what the problem is :-

Shiralee Doveston says. "You do not get enough benefits. It just does not make ends meet."

Right, alternatively you could get up off your fat ar$e and do something for yourself for once. :o

Have you see the premise of company they mentioned, 'Buy As You View', they literally put a coin box on your TV and once you've fed it enough money they let you watch shopping channels and provided you feed enough margin into the box you can buy whatever you like on the knock! I think that pretty much sums it all up, sit and watch TV all day, use your benefits as leverage for ridiculously priced sub-prime loans and you can buy whatever crap you like without even having to stand up.

It just shows you how down and dirty the loans industry is, they no longer trust people to answer the door so they clamp a box to your TV so people can save themselves from the old "have tax credit money must spend" problem, much like a child in a sweetshop.

"These sort of people" -- listen to yourself. It could be you one day.

I will never be like them, never. I'd sooner seek a contract abroad than visit a benefits office.

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That they are not queueing to have their homes reposessed.

I don't think anyone has insinuated that people like this will have anything to do with house prices, reposessions or finding Elvis?

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Guest Alright Jack

I notice that the young lady at the top of the article is INCREDIBLY FAT.

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Two kids means someone "visited" her at least twice !!!

Have you not heard of twins?

I notice that the young lady at the top of the article is INCREDIBLY FAT.

So are you suggesting that she could cut back on KFC and McDonalds in order to pay her way?

I can understand how it would be hard to survive on benefits if all you eat if KFC at £4 a go.

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I don't think anyone has insinuated that people like this will have anything to do with house prices, reposessions or finding Elvis?

Sorry, thought your original posting might have been loosely connected with HPC <_<

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Christ.

"These sort of people" -- listen to yourself. It could be you one day.

Sure some of them are taking on debts that they shouldn't be. But some of them are people like the women Martin Lewis talked about on mse: she'd had her benefits stopped for two weeks & as a result had gone down into a spiral of ever increasing debt. When it's your offspring who need food and your benefits haven't been paid, what are you going to do?

You talk about "living beyond their means" as if its some kind of moral failing. For some people it can be a matter of putting food on the table, or paying the bus fare so their kids can get to school.

Phil

For your information that was me once - I have bought up a child on benefit - mine had special needs and I couldn;t work when he was younger. This was in the 'tory' days when benfit was a lot lower than it is now and there was no subsidised child care. Child care often cost more than jobs paid - that's if you could get a place in an nursery (none would take my son anyway).

My kid used to empty the food cupboards in the middle of the night trashing a whole weeks shop - because he had a growth disorder he could grow out of all his clothes within a two week period - he dismantled furniture and required constant supervision.

Yes - things were hard. I didn't own a coat until my son was three - I used to wear 2/3 jumpers in the winter instead . I sometimes had to make the choice between feeding myself or buying clothes for my son - but I managed without any loans/family financial help etc.

I bought clothes from second hand shops - I fed my son nothing but freshly made food (it is cheaper than buying processed crap), I played with my kid instead of relying on the latest hight tech toys as a convenient babysitter.

My son is now a lovely teeanger (despite his difficulties), and has less behaviour problems than most 'normal' kids.

My point is that in todays world the benefit system does provide for the basics and more. know lots of single parents on benefit now that can afford to run a car, clothe their kids and feed them nutritional food.

I expect the benefit system to provide a decent living - food on the table etc, also clothes, brithday and xmas presents and maybe a cheap holdiay each year. Bringing up kids is a job in itself and should be supported by the state but it is perfectly possible to bring up kids on a low income.

I wanted more for my son so I got of my @rse and did a degree, an MA and a PhD while bringing him up single handed.

I do not advocate this 'if I can do it anyone can' attitude, everyone has differnt life experiences that effect their motivations and goals in life.

The point is that I do not believe that anyone, in 2006 can not afford to put food on the table without resorting to loan sharks.

If you are old enough to have a kid then you are old enough to understand that society owes you a basic living and nothing more - if you want more then get of your @**** and get it.

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For your information that was me once - I have bought up a child on benefit - mine had special needs and I couldn;t work when he was younger. This was in the 'tory' days when benfit was a lot lower than it is now and there was no subsidised child care. Child care often cost more than jobs paid - that's if you could get a place in an nursery (none would take my son anyway).

My kid used to empty the food cupboards in the middle of the night trashing a whole weeks shop - because he had a growth disorder he could grow out of all his clothes within a two week period - he dismantled furniture and required constant supervision.

Yes - things were hard. I didn't own a coat until my son was three - I used to wear 2/3 jumpers in the winter instead . I sometimes had to make the choice between feeding myself or buying clothes for my son - but I managed without any loans/family financial help etc.

I bought clothes from second hand shops - I fed my son nothing but freshly made food (it is cheaper than buying processed crap), I played with my kid instead of relying on the latest hight tech toys as a convenient babysitter.

My son is now a lovely teeanger (despite his difficulties), and has less behaviour problems than most 'normal' kids.

My point is that in todays world the benefit system does provide for the basics and more. know lots of single parents on benefit now that can afford to run a car, clothe their kids and feed them nutritional food.

I expect the benefit system to provide a decent living - food on the table etc, also clothes, brithday and xmas presents and maybe a cheap holdiay each year. Bringing up kids is a job in itself and should be supported by the state but it is perfectly possible to bring up kids on a low income.

I wanted more for my son so I got of my @rse and did a degree, an MA and a PhD while bringing him up single handed.

I do not advocate this 'if I can do it anyone can' attitude, everyone has differnt life experiences that effect their motivations and goals in life.

The point is that I do not believe that anyone, in 2006 can not afford to put food on the table without resorting to loan sharks.

If you are old enough to have a kid then you are old enough to understand that society owes you a basic living and nothing more - if you want more then get of your @**** and get it.

Now, now, let's not run Shiralee down into the ground completely.

What don't we know about her? She's a mother of two and there is probably no husband at home.

No jobs, low benefits and she can't work because she has two kids - probably couldn't afford to work and pay childcare - probably can't get much work beyond the 16 hours a week the DSS let you work for without deducting your benefits.

On top of that, she probably wants some "diversions" to fill the little free time she does get when she's not looking after her kids.

A hard luck case I think.

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I find myself wondering if 1 in every 10 own a BMW X5 too... :blink:

Last evening,clutching a pint of chilled beer,I sat on the sea front @ Porthcawl in South Wales.I was truly amazed at the amount of very expensive cars passing by.I commented it was like being at the motor show.Loads of 30k plus cars,just one after the other.Arrived home and looked at house prices there,gob smacking.This is S.Wales,not really known for it`s high wages.

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Lets not even bother to think about if benefits can be lived on or not

Because I for one do not care in the slightest.

They can get their off their arses and get a job. Everything is too easy for these people.

And stop having scummy little chav children with single mothers

Im tired of supporting the welfare benefit system and immigrants (both should be stopped)

And also whilst we are at it, lets get some tougher penalties for criminals and bring back the death penalty if our jails are filling up too much...

( i like the judge dredd appeal to the justice system!!)

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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