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Rain'ard

Old Lady Tells Me To Stuff It

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I was sitting with an old lady who was waiting for hospital transport yesterday, and we got talking about house prices. I said to her I bet when you were young you didn’t expect your house to be worth more than quarter of a million.

That’s right she said. I bought my three bedroom maisonette in 1962 for three and a half thousand pounds, I had it valued the other day and was told it was worth three hundred and fifty thousand.

I said, Why don’t you downsize and half of that money for making you life more comfortable?

She replied “I’m not interested in all that I wouldn’t have nowhere to keep my stuff.”

I was amazed by this lady, she wasn’t in the least impressed by it all.

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I was sitting with an old lady who was waiting for hospital transport yesterday, and we got talking about house prices. I said to her I bet when you were young you didn’t expect your house to be worth more than quarter of a million.

That’s right she said. I bought my three bedroom maisonette in 1962 for three and a half thousand pounds, I had it valued the other day and was told it was worth three hundred and fifty thousand.

I said, Why don’t you downsize and half of that money for making you life more comfortable?

She replied “I’m not interested in all that I wouldn’t have nowhere to keep my stuff.”

I was amazed by this lady, she wasn’t in the least impressed by it all.

interested enough to have it valued though, eh ? ;)

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interested enough to have it valued though, eh ? ;)

Yes, Signs, that point did not escape me at the time. I wonder who put her up to it though. Little vultures from out of the womb?

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I think alot of old people probably want to stay in the houses they have been used to for many years and are probably not interested in money. And why shouldn't they? They have worked all their lives. This 'downsizing' thing is a relatively recent invention that has appeared since everybody started complaining about house prices. Old people are not the enemy, they are under just as much assault by the British government as anybody else and if anything deserve more respect than the young. I noticed that the government started making noises about giving old people free financial advice the other day. Sounds to me like a snide ploy to persuade them to downsize. The other day I watched, from up the road, a couple peering over someone's fence to get a good look at a house that wasn't even for sale. I hate what's happened to this country. The British just look like a bunch of disgusting, greedy rats to me.

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I think alot of old people probably want to stay in the houses they have been used to for many years and are probably not interested in money. And why shouldn't they? They have worked all their lives. This 'downsizing' thing is a relatively recent invention that has appeared since everybody started complaining about house prices. Old people are not the enemy, they are under just as much assault by the British government as anybody else and if anything deserve more respect than the young. I noticed that the government started making noises about giving old people free financial advice the other day. Sounds to me like a snide ploy to persuade them to downsize. The other day I watched, from up the road, a couple peering over someone's fence to get a good look at a house that wasn't even for sale. I hate what's happened to this country. The British just look like a bunch of disgusting, greedy rats to me.

Now one of my sons has moved out, and the other one in the process, a lot of people tell me I ought to downsize.

I don't want to! We like our house, and want somewhere big enough for them all to come back for Sunday lunch etc! I've no interest in "cashing in" by downsizing. To me it's somewhere nice to live, not an investment.

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Now one of my sons has moved out, and the other one in the process, a lot of people tell me I ought to downsize.

I don't want to! We like our house, and want somewhere big enough for them all to come back for Sunday lunch etc! I've no interest in "cashing in" by downsizing. To me it's somewhere nice to live, not an investment.

We'd like somewhere big enough to house the babies still in the nest, nevermind have room for Sunday lunch visitors too, you're very lucky I hope you realise that !

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We'd like somewhere big enough to house the babies still in the nest, nevermind have room for Sunday lunch visitors too, you're very lucky I hope you realise that !

The problem is with the government and their inability to allow houses that families want to be built, with nice gardens and parking.

They seem intent on taking away a real sense of owning somewhere and packing us into as small a space as possible, in squalid flats luxury apartments for as much money as possible. Then they wonder why we are so unhappy!

Edited by erd

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Now one of my sons has moved out, and the other one in the process, a lot of people tell me I ought to downsize.

I don't want to! We like our house, and want somewhere big enough for them all to come back for Sunday lunch etc! I've no interest in "cashing in" by downsizing. To me it's somewhere nice to live, not an investment.

Stay put then. You've every right. 'Downsizing' is one of these modern catchwords which have evolved to suit somebody else's political agenda.

Edited by Als

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We'd like somewhere big enough to house the babies still in the nest, nevermind have room for Sunday lunch visitors too, you're very lucky I hope you realise that !

I had that problem when mine were babies. I was only able to buy somewhere bigger in 94, after the last crash. (Plus I worked hard to earn money from a sucessful career, to buy it)

The problem is with the government and their inability to allow houses that families want to be built, with nice gardens and parking.

They seem intent on taking away a real sense of owning somewhere and packing us into as small a space as possible, in squalid flats luxury apartments for as much money as possible. Then they wonder why we are so unhappy!

Some of the 2 bed apartments my son's looking at are far less depressing than the first home I had, garden or no garden!

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I had that problem when mine were babies. I was only able to buy somewhere bigger in 94, after the last crash. (Plus I worked hard to earn money from a sucessful career, to buy it)

Some of the 2 bed apartments my son's looking at are far less depressing than the first home I had, garden or no garden!

I'm with you, CO. My first 2 properties were small flats which I suspect wouldn't have been considered by half the moaning FTBs on here. In fact, I wasn't able to buy my first 'proper' house with 'proper' garden until I was well into my 40s, and I managed that only after planning career changes that would allow me to move up the ladder a bit.

These home improvement programmes on TV that show glamorous young couples eyeing up 3/4 bed houses with gardens seem to have distorted expectations.

Edited by brassfarthing

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I'm with you, CO. My first 2 properties were small flats which I suspect wouldn't have been considered by half the moaning FTBs on here. In fact, I wasn't able to buy my first 'proper' house with 'proper' garden until I was well into my 40s, and I managed that only after planning career changes that would allow me to move up the ladder a bit.

These home improvement programmes on TV that show glamorous young couples eyeing up 3/4 bed houses with gardens seem to have distorted expectations.

I am a single guy in my mid-thirties on an above average professional salary and I cannot afford to buy even the smallest flat without massive risk. You need to wake-up to reality my friend.

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I'm with you, CO. My first 2 properties were small flats which I suspect wouldn't have been considered by half the moaning FTBs on here. In fact, I wasn't able to buy my first 'proper' house with 'proper' garden until I was well into my 40s, and I managed that only after planning career changes that would allow me to move up the ladder a bit.

These home improvement programmes on TV that show glamorous young couples eyeing up 3/4 bed houses with gardens seem to have distorted expectations.

My first home was a 2 bedroom end terrace with a decent garden. I was on 50% less salary than I am now when I bought

it. I can now no longer afford to buy this same house.

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She replied “I’m not interested in all that I wouldn’t have nowhere to keep my stuff.”

I was amazed by this lady, she wasn’t in the least impressed by it all.

Sounds like my uncle, my aunt, my dad, my mum etc etc.

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I am a single guy in my mid-thirties on an above average professional salary and I cannot afford to buy even the smallest flat without massive risk. You need to wake-up to reality my friend.

exactly - why should those earning decent money be forced to live in such places - surely it is only fair that if you work hard/earn more you should be rewarded with a higher standard of accomodation - or else what is the point.

what i find amazing is that peoples opions as to to what constitutes a 'nice house' have changed so dramatically - basic houses originally designed for those on very low incomes are now going for a bomb. also, although some can look very nice when done properly, it is pretty bizzare that people can now be considered to be living in luxury within converted barns/warehouses/factories etc!

madness.

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I'm with you, CO. My first 2 properties were small flats which I suspect wouldn't have been considered by half the moaning FTBs on here. In fact, I wasn't able to buy my first 'proper' house with 'proper' garden until I was well into my 40s, and I managed that only after planning career changes that would allow me to move up the ladder a bit.

These home improvement programmes on TV that show glamorous young couples eyeing up 3/4 bed houses with gardens seem to have distorted expectations.

Brassfarthing - My parents are at the same age we are when they bought the house down the road from where i live now. I can tell you, we are in a similar situation to them, but we couldn't afford to buy it now - they could, and we're not a glamorous young couple like you suggest. Also this nonsense about half decent houses, and how ungrateful we are is clap trap, it's the owners who do up their houses/flats with stupid flooring and "oh it's absolutely georgous" Justin and whatshisface lime green paint, and cheap, but new kitchens that expect a whooping stack of cash. Who cares what the houses are decorated like. That's superficial, what matters is that housing is not worth the risk, whether you're in it for the long term or not. What you're saying is that the problem isn't house prices, the problem is the greedy selfish ftb's - who want something for nothing, and whose standards are too high.

You obviously - don't take into account that crime is worse that it was back then. A lot of the areas my friends grew up in that were low income houses, and good first homes, are very unsafe now because of the crime rate today. For example a house i used to rent had hanging baskets 15+ years ago, now it has used needles. Do i want my five year old running about near that? How fussy of me. And to pay 100k extra for the privalidge than i would have done four years ago? I don't think so. Oh then there's job security. If there wasn't a problem in the recent house price hikes, and it wasn't encouraging people to get into stupid levels of debt, there wouldn't be this site.

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The problem is with the government and their inability to allow houses that families want to be built, with nice gardens and parking.

They seem intent on taking away a real sense of owning somewhere and packing us into as small a space as possible, in squalid flats luxury apartments for as much money as possible. Then they wonder why we are so unhappy!

Absolutely hit the nail on the head.

Some lovely new houses going up but crammed in, no privacy, nowhere to park. Have you noticed how quickly these houses go up for sale after people originally move in. They buy the dream from the sales office and then live the nightmare.

In my opinion (from both personal experience and observing the market in both Rugby and E Yorks) anything that is traditional/mature with a decent garden and parking sells almost immediately, houses on the new ppg3 estates really struggle.

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Some of the 2 bed apartments my son's looking at are far less depressing than the first home I had, garden or no garden!

Aye, they don't know how lucky they are. Now when I were a lad there were six of us living in shoebox int middle 'o road

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Brassfarthing - My parents are at the same age we are when they bought the house down the road from where i live now. I can tell you, we are in a similar situation to them, but we couldn't afford to buy it now - they could, and we're not a glamorous young couple like you suggest. Also this nonsense about half decent houses, and how ungrateful we are is clap trap, it's the owners who do up their houses/flats with stupid flooring and "oh it's absolutely georgous" Justin and whatshisface lime green paint, and cheap, but new kitchens that expect a whooping stack of cash. Who cares what the houses are decorated like. That's superficial, what matters is that housing is not worth the risk, whether you're in it for the long term or not. What you're saying is that the problem isn't house prices, the problem is the greedy selfish ftb's - who want something for nothing, and whose standards are too high.

You obviously - don't take into account that crime is worse that it was back then. A lot of the areas my friends grew up in that were low income houses, and good first homes, are very unsafe now because of the crime rate today. For example a house i used to rent had hanging baskets 15+ years ago, now it has used needles. Do i want my five year old running about near that? How fussy of me. And to pay 100k extra for the privalidge than i would have done four years ago? I don't think so. Oh then there's job security. If there wasn't a problem in the recent house price hikes, and it wasn't encouraging people to get into stupid levels of debt, there wouldn't be this site.

Is this gibberish or is it me!

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

Yes, Signs, that point did not escape me at the time. I wonder who put her up to it though. Little vultures from out of the womb?

;)

Good news for grasping youngsters who fear their parents are about to cash in the family home and fritter away the inheritance.

It seems the old folk`s caveman genes will be urging them to hang on to the house until they die.

A new paper from academic Steffen Huck at University College London probes what has until now been one of the greatest mysteries in economics-the `endowment effect`This describes why people`s attachment to possessions tends greatly to exceed their market value. The Royal Economic Society, which is publishing the paper by Huck and collaborators Georg Kirchsteiger and Jorg Oechssler, says: `People wonder why few elderly homeowners take out equity release plans to boost their income, or capitals on the booming housing market by selling their homes and moving to a more convenient flat.`

Huck and Co have cracked it, apparently. It all goes back to our days in the hunter-gatherer environment. A hunter who wanteda balanced diet would have to swap meat for berries, for example, but would have an inflated sense of value of what he owned-meat.

The consequences: if you like something, then you will think it is worth a lot and you will want a lot in return.

That`s why, the paper says, `emotional attachment to some of our possessions might actually be hard-wired in our brains`.

Just what forward planning sons and daughters wanted to hear.

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I'm with you, CO. My first 2 properties were small flats which I suspect wouldn't have been considered by half the moaning FTBs on here. In fact, I wasn't able to buy my first 'proper' house with 'proper' garden until I was well into my 40s, and I managed that only after planning career changes that would allow me to move up the ladder a bit.

These home improvement programmes on TV that show glamorous young couples eyeing up 3/4 bed houses with gardens seem to have distorted expectations.

You don't say what your job or salary were when you bought your small flats. Or whether you were single. Your anecdote proves nothing. Single people these days don't even figure in the housing market, unless they have equity already.

The housing stock in this country is getting worse, not better. The average new build home is now 30% smaller than it was 20 years ago. Not to mention all the houses that have been knocked down or converted to provide smaller dwellings.

And the 'moaning FTBs' you talk about are facing income multiples that you could only have dreamed of back then, because the bank would not have lent them to you.

I think in fact that you are the one that has had your head turned by these TV shows and the glamorous couples. ;)

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:ph34r:

Well, I am a nearly old lady who sold her house in 1985 before moving overseas and I regret it. For the past six years, I have been watching the UK housing market very, very closely and sometimes panicking and wanting to buy something sight unseen just to "get my foot back in the market". Emotionally, this is very foolish, because I know that the economists cannot successfully micromanage the large worldwide economy too much longer. There is too much phoney wealth in the world. It will affect housing, one of the symptoms of this phoney wealth.

Anyway, I am in this situation where I want to return to the UK after many years overseas, and I want to purchase a retirement home. I am very depressed at what I see. I won't bore you with the details but I may end up in the Orkneys or on a narrowboat, as that is about what I can afford at present.

I am glad that there are still some people out there who are not greedy. They see their home as a home, not an investment or way to get rick so they don't have to do real work. Too much Americanization is what I see in Britain. Greed, profit, me, me, me.

All I can say, is that I hope there is a bubble ***** soon. I have six years to go before retirement and the current housing inflation in the UK and the Western world is just not sustainable. Houses that are 4 yo 6 times one's income !!! Ridiculous.

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my parents have been suggested to 'downsize' and not by me or brother or sister! their 'friend' suggested it, as they are reaching 70. what this means i dont know, but he assumed they were 'getting on'

70? my Dad's response,"i didnt be careful to save, buy a nice house, be careful with money, only to move back to the house similar to one I couldnt wait to get out of, and 70 is nothing' ! fair comment!

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My parents have an eight bedroom house on the south coast, we were brought up there and they worked hard to buy it, why should they give up their well earnt lifestyle to bank money that will last longer than them?

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My parents have an eight bedroom house on the south coast, we were brought up there and they worked hard to buy it, why should they give up their well earnt lifestyle to bank money that will last longer than them?

Because they could have a better lifestyle and still live in a gorgeous 5 bedder?

Lifestyle > House you live in.

Its their decision.

In the future its possible taxation will be modified to incentivise older singles/couples to move out of 5+ bedroom houses on condition a family with preschool children takes their place.

Whatever your opinion its a fact that older singles/couples dominate the des res segment while younger families occupy modest 2/3/4 bedders.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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