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Lap Dancer In 85k Of Debt!

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What would the minimum repayments be on £85k?

The banks must have been stupid to give her that amount of credit after she'd already been made bankrupt :rolleyes:

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I really think that in cases like this it should be made public which banks are charging me and you extra to cover the costs of their imprudent lending policies, and which are responsible lenders.

I am not saying every debtor should be hung drawn and quartered, but FFS, SOMEONE will be footing the bill, and it shouldn't be me in any way shape or form.

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Miss Robinson's spending problem is so bad she has been picked to appear on a TV show, Britain's Biggest Spenders, alongside three shopaholics who do not share her debt problems. Britain's Biggest Spenders is on ITV1 at 9pm on Tuesday.

Should be - Britain's biggest tossers.

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I really think that in cases like this it should be made public which banks are charging me and you extra to cover the costs of their imprudent lending policies, and which are responsible lenders.

I am not saying every debtor should be hung drawn and quartered, but FFS, SOMEONE will be footing the bill, and it shouldn't be me in any way shape or form.

I think she should be banned from ever having credit again! Its just ridiculous that someone can get into so much unsecured debt in the first place.

I had this thought that maybe in schools, they should teach kids about money management & how its really better to save for stuff that you want rather than just getting it by borrowing and debt. A bit old fashioned I know but a simple principle- you want something, you save for it! Delayed gratification and all that!! And if this woman is stupid enough to borrow 5 grand to pay for a new chest , then she deserves everything she gets!! :)

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Can already imagine the type she is, silly little giggle and saying how naughty she was.

I would call it a lot more than being a little naughty, it is a crime in my eyes, at least one of her creditors should be able to strap het to a post naked and giver her a good ********, because that is what she has done to them.

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[

She looks a bit "on the turn" to me.

On the turn? :huh: She looks as though she's been embalmed.

I love the line about the childhood in suburban utopia - mummy and daddy must be so proud their little girl's grown up to be a lap dancer.

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Guest Winners and Losers

Right lads, who's not in favour of bailing her out?

Shaker's already done his bit to help out the lap dancers. :rolleyes:

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Isn't 31 a bit old to be a lap dancer? :unsure:

what are you sayin like? I need to find a new career?

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I really don't know the answer.

I don't think that govt should increase regulation to tighten lending criteria - govt regulation should be kept to a minimum, and if I want to borrow and someone is stupid enough to hand over the dosh, then surely that's between the two of us.

BUT, borrowing £85,000 without being able to pay it back could and should be considered fraud.

Also, there is the cost to responsible borrowers, and people who don't borrow. And the harm to society of rampant materialism - keeping up with the Jones' is hard enough without trying to keep up with the Jones' who don't care if they go bankrupt.

Banks should be fined for irresponsible lending. Off the top of my head, unsecured lending that is above £10k that subsequently get's written off or leads to a bankruptcy comes under a microscope. If the guy lost his job unexpectedly there may be a case for no fine, but if they lent £20k to a McJob muppet then they get fined the amount they have to write off. If they have ignored the fact someone is mentally ill or already has significant other unsecured lending then the bank is guilty. Let them lend but punish them for lending in circumstances that were irresponsible and turn out badly.

AND banks should be compelled to offer "basic accounts". One's whereby you can only withdraw cash, pay in a cheque and make cheque (no guarantee card) and internet bank payments. Strict controls to ensure that there is no chance of going overdrawn (a penny over and the cheque is bounced - maybe even compulsion to keep £200 in at all times to cover fees for bouncing cheques). These accounts should be available to all, and they should be the only type of account available to undischarged bankrupts (5-10 years dependent on cicumstances, maybe life if the bankruptcy is due to any of clothes, holidays, electrical, holidays or plastic surgery)

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I don't understand how she's borrowed so much?

£5000 spending limit on her first credit card? - something wrong there - it's usually £500

I reckon the whole story is BS

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I don't understand how she's borrowed so much?

I'll wager she was an avid consumer of South American table salt

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I don't understand how she's borrowed so much?

£5000 spending limit on her first credit card? - something wrong there - it's usually £500

I reckon the whole story is BS

I am not sure. My first credit card had about a £1000 limit, which they started putting up by about £1000 every few months. After a while (and several phonecalls) I told them to reduce my limit to about £4000 and if they raised it again without my permission I'd close the account.

Just paid it off, but I had need for credit recently and managed to rack up £10k on credit cards no problem (I'd had the cards for ages). I also managed to completely surprise myself by getting a £10,000 overdraft limit from my bank! I have been self employed for a few years, not earning huge sums, and due to full time studies my income was well below normal levels at the time. £20k unsecured borrowings without trying and without any sort of decent income.

I have a friend who claims to be able to pay his debt off anytime he wants, but he seems to be quite happy to juggle £30k on a number of interest free credit cards.

Credit is far too easy to obtain.

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She's a bloody stupid tart and about to commit a Crime which could end up with her going to Prison.

I have to stop my spending, clear my debt and start again.

But before I do that, I want a holiday at the seven-star Burj Al Arab hotel in Dubai and a pink, convertible Ferrari.

By still spending money in this reckless fashion, and knowing she's about to go bankrupt, is a Criminal offence!

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She's a bloody stupid tart and about to commit a Crime which could end up with her going to Prison.

By still spending money in this reckless fashion, and knowing she's about to go bankrupt, is a Criminal offence!

But surely she'll only be in trouble if her creditors find out about it! :rolleyes:

Billy Shears

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I don't understand how she's borrowed so much?

£5000 spending limit on her first credit card? - something wrong there - it's usually £500

I reckon the whole story is BS

oh, that's what you mean. Me and my sordid imagination.

Well, I just got my first ever CC (to stooze, and get World Cup tickets) and I instantly received an £8,000 limit. And I don't earn an outrageous amount of money, nor do I have huge savings or financial assets

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  • 333 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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