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Flying An England Flag Is Affecting House Prices


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I'm fed up with all these people having a go at those flying the flag and getting behind our boys. It appears we (yes, my house and motor are festooned with SGX) are the victim of a pincer movement; on the one hand from the suburban snobs who think anyone who likes football is a chav and on the other the Leftist PC brigade who preceive the flying of the flag as 'racist' or 'islamophobic'. Actually the Guardianistas may have a point but when the establishment has virtually eliminated patriotism, it's hardly surprising that some people have found car flags as a way of sticking two fingers up to the multiculturalists.

I'm sure that's another thing the pc police will be clamping down on soon :angry:

I admit, I am a snob, but in my defence I do like football (and understand the offside rule), but still don't like the chavvy car flags. :P

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I'm fed up with all these people having a go at those flying the flag and getting behind our boys. It appears we (yes, my house and motor are festooned with SGX) are the victim of a pincer movement; on the one hand from the suburban snobs who think anyone who likes football is a chav and on the other the Leftist PC brigade who preceive the flying of the flag as 'racist' or 'islamophobic'. Actually the Guardianistas may have a point but when the establishment has virtually eliminated patriotism, it's hardly surprising that some people have found car flags as a way of sticking two fingers up to the multiculturalists.

I'm sure that's another thing the pc police will be clamping down on soon :angry:

No one likes the PC crowd - they are annoying as hell. But that has nothing to do with multiculturalism. Personally I like being in a place where people feel free to be themselves and not have to conform to what some dictatorship of the majority thinks they should be like.

EDIT: I remember when I was at school and our teacher told us we couldn't talk about "blackboards" in case someone thought it was racist. Err... It's a board and it's black, and white chalk goes on it - it has nothing to do with race. We all just stared at him, and at least he looked embarassed too.

Edited by AFineMess
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this threads still going

the good thing about putting your flag out is I know how long the property has been on the market for

This one was taken during the queens golden Jubilee in 2002.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-761...a_n=15&tr_t=buy

3767_JSP02401_IMG_00.JPG

Why do they keep going on about WAYNE ROONEY every 2 minutes!!!!! ????

Edited by notanewmember
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nah na nah. nah na nah.

nah na nah.

were going to act more closet gay than you.......

nah na nah. nah na nah.

nah na nah.

were only guys...

there are no girls.

there only guys hugging guys watching guys

in our world.

and were going to act more closet gay than you.......

nah na nah. nah na nah.

nah na nah.

the serenity.......

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I will be flying the English flag and I don't give a t0ss what the PC brigade think

I am English and am proud to fly that flag but I fly it with a strong belief about what being English means to me - not in celebration of the 3rd rate, wining, chav infested place this country has become.

I don't think flying the flag is racist or antagonistic either - there is nothing wrong with showing a bit of pride in your country and support for 'our boys' in a friendly sporting event.

FFS it's the world cup not a world war - lighten up

BTW I have also just purchased a rather nifty bottle open that cheers whenever it touches a beer bottle top - classy :lol:

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FFS it's the world cup not a world war - lighten up

On that note, you all might find this amusing:

Our Cup Rageth Over

By TIM PARKS

June 6, 2006; Page A14

Soccer's World Cup is supposed to be party time for billions of fans

around the globe. And it is -- insofar as the specter of a blind and

embattled solidarity gripping the public mind can be described as a party.

The 32-nation tournament, which kicks off anew in Germany on Friday, is a

winner-takes-all competition where every match is a battle and the

delirium of world domination takes a powerful hold on collective

psychology. For one heady month the national team becomes the nation at

war. The dread of humiliating defeat is in the air. In Brazil, Argentina,

Germany, Italy, England, people don't so much look forward to the World

Cup as hold their breaths, cross their fingers. They rally to the nation's

colors. They hang out flags. These are dangerous emotions.

That is not, of course, the official version. FIFA, the sport's governing

body, likes to talk about "the beautiful game" bringing together the

nations of the world in a spirit of friendliness -- a contribution, in

short, to world peace. Indeed, the fantastic comedy of the World Cup lies

in the tension between the pious internationalist rhetoric and the

nail-biting, hysterical, nationalist reality. The television will do

everything to convince you that you are watching a harmless "feast of

football," while in fact the huge revenues the game is generating depend

on the mobilization of emotions that commentators take care never to

mention, except perhaps to condemn a lunatic fringe of hooligans. In 1998

British fans vandalized various French towns. In 2002 Russian fans,

watching their team's defeat to Japan on huge screens set up in the

squares of Moscow, rioted. They destroyed Japanese restaurants and

attacked any East Asian they could find. The greatest headache for this

year's organizers will be law and order. In England, the Samaritans (an

emergency counseling agency) will keep their staff at full strength to

deal with the misery should England lose a crucial game.

* * *

The competition was born out of cheating. Soccer had been officially

included in the Olympic Games in 1908. Players were supposed to be

amateurs. England withdrew from the sport in 1920 when this was clearly

not the case. In 1924 and 1928 Uruguay won the tournament with

professionals masquerading as amateurs, at which point the only possible

response for the offended pride of the other competitors was to

acknowledge a fait accompli and get FIFA to set up a competition for

professionals.

This did not end the cheating. I know of no other sport where bad faith is

so endemic, condoned and ritualized as in soccer, where lies and deception

are ordinarily the rule. Every refereeing decision is contested, even when

what has happened is clear as day. A player protests that the ball has

gone over the line when everybody has seen that it hasn't. Passed by an

attacker in full flight, a defender grabs his shirt, stops him, then

immediately denies that he has done so. Unable to pass a defender, the

striker runs into him and promptly falls over, claiming he has been

pushed.

Nor are refereeing decisions always convincing. To help Korea, co-host of

the last World Cup, see off Italy and Spain, referees had to bend rules to

the limit and some distance beyond. During the Turkey-Brazil game in the

same competition, an angry Turkish player kicked the ball at the Brazilian

Rivaldo, who had recently been voted best player in the world. Hit on the

knee (by the ball!), Rivaldo collapsed, pretending he had been violently

struck in the face. The referee sent off the Turk, eliminating him from

the game. Afterward, Rivaldo claimed his deception was a normal part of

football. The organizers, who had said they would be tough on dishonesty,

fined him $7,000 -- a day's pay at his level -- but wouldn't suspend him

for even one match.

Developing, as it did, in Europe at a moment when industrialization was

destroying traditional societies, soccer thrived on that nostalgia for

community which was to be such a powerful emotion in the first half of the

20th century. Ever more isolated, the modern individual could lose himself

in a crowd, asserting a strong collective identity created out of fierce

rivalry with a neighboring town. Chanted insults between opposing fan

groups are the norm at European games. On the pitch, the extraordinary

skill of the players, the colorful pattern of their rapid movements, the

tension as one waits and waits for that goal that never comes, all create

a collective enchantment that prolongs the standoff between the two

enemies. At the end, if the police are efficient, and nothing too

inflammatory has happened during the game, we can all return home with

perhaps only a couple of rocks thrown.

But what is passion and identity for the fans is money for the organizers.

Since television rather than ticket sales became the main source of

revenue, and the amounts of money at stake spiralled accordingly, the

temptation to fix matches grew. When the latest scandal in Italian

football broke a few weeks ago, most fans were not surprised to discover

that the most successful club, Juventus, has for years been able to

influence the choice of referees for crucial games, ensuring that their

team gets favorable treatment. Paradoxically, rather than chasing the

hardcore fans away, this cheating only intensifies their passion. They

support their team despite the system, against the system. The sense of

embattled identity just grows stronger. The more soccer appears to be in a

mess, the more excitement it arouses.

Held every four years, the World Cup shifts this excitement from the local

to the national scene, suddenly involving huge numbers of people who have

never been to a soccer stadium, rarely watch the game on TV, and are not

accustomed to handling the emotions it so effectively arouses. Incapable

of judging what is happening on the field, they are easily influenced by

partisan commentators. Watching the game at home they cannot enjoy the

catharsis of the crowd experience, where losing is offset by a sense of

community. Many a dog and cat will pay the price for this when, in the

logic of the knockout competition, every team but one goes out.

In the stadiums, too, many spectators will have little idea what is going

on. Apparently terrified that real soccer fans might turn up in any

numbers, the German organizers gave no preference to season-ticket

holders. Instead, they assigned tickets to all comers on a lottery basis.

Applicants didn't know whether they were likely to be watching Mexico

versus Angola or France-Korea, as if what mattered was the pure spectacle

rather than the emotional engagement in it. So, while in distant Mexico

and Angola people go into paroxysms in front of whatever televisions they

have, the crowd in Germany will likely watch in polite bemusement, perhaps

waving the colorful flags they will no doubt be given to help television

create a sense of festival.

"The civilizing passage from blows to insults," wrote the philosopher Emil

Cioran, "was no doubt necessary, but the price was high. Words will never

be enough. We will always be nostalgic for violence and blood." Soccer

offers an ambiguous middle ground between words and blows. In a parody of

conflict that constantly hovers on the edge of chaos, it brings together

two of our strongest yet contradictory impulses -- for universal

brotherhood and world domination. Perhaps Americans find it hard to get

involved because they are still busy with the real thing.

Mr. Parks is the author of "A Season with Verona" (Arcade Publishing, 2002).

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Only in England would flying the country's own flag produce an 8-page thread of arguments. You can be a nationalist without being a bigot...it seems to me that some of the real hardcore Tory boys are so wrapped up in accumulation and advance for themselves that the very idea of any sort of communal, tribal or ethnic interest inpeople outside of themselves is repugnant.

Fly your flag with pride and enjoy the WC. Hope you get cuffed, mind. :P:P

I hope I'll be forgiven for quoting Scott on a thread about England.

BREATHES there the man with soul so dead,

Who never to himself hath said,

This is my own, my native land!

Whose heart hath ne'er within him burn'd,

As home his footsteps he hath turn'd

From wandering on a foreign strand!

If such there breathe, go, mark him well;

For him no Minstrel raptures swell;

High though his titles, proud his name,

Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;

Despite those titles, power, and pelf,

The wretch, concentred all in self,

Living, shall forfeit fair renown,

And, doubly dying, shall go down

To the vile dust, from whence he sprung,

Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.

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NEWSFLASH - JUST IN !!!

The Government are doing a survey in England to establish the average Englishman's pen1s size. Apparently all men with a pen1s size of 3 inches or less, have to signify this by flying a white flag with a red cross on their car !

:D:D:D

And yes - I am Scottish. Don't you have the feelin it's all gonna end in tears again. As Jim Royle would say " World Cup MY @RSE ". Let the battle commence :D

..........now where's my old Brazil shirt.........................

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i cant wait for the half ass let down start. the middle struggle fight back. then the enevitable could have gone either way semi final against france where we always get kicked out.

im ready for the panoramas of town centre crowds watching big tv jump at the goals. also watching the few football girls jump about .5 second after the blokes, since they have no idea what a goal is or what it does. but they love football.

they the ANALysis. with coulda woulda shoudas from has beens. gary linniker will over do his cheeky act. ian wright will be too trendy and prefect. then an itv collage video round up with classical music overtones - mozart maybe. while we watch 2 minute scenes of all the england fans at the end. close up crying and waving sad flags in slow motion.....

as i said. the serenity of euro 96.....

then we will watch rory mcgrath on 'not the world cup 06' with johnathon ross, who will proclaim some of the first light ribbing of the defeated returning england team on a BA 777 to a raptous welcome.

with a promising goal for wilcox. something to look forward to in 2010 when we will be paying back our debts.

by the next world cup - our housing should be normal (hopes).

if not - MAKE the 2010 world cup your day to buy or die.

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I will be flying the English flag and I don't give a t0ss what the PC brigade think

I am English and am proud to fly that flag but I fly it with a strong belief about what being English means to me - not in celebration of the 3rd rate, wining, chav infested place this country has become.

I don't think flying the flag is racist or antagonistic either - there is nothing wrong with showing a bit of pride in your country and support for 'our boys' in a friendly sporting event.

FFS it's the world cup not a world war - lighten up

BTW I have also just purchased a rather nifty bottle open that cheers whenever it touches a beer bottle top - classy :lol:

Good for you. Fly your flag with pride. If anyone attempts puts you down for that, then their attitude says more about them than it says about you.

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