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nordiclad

To Hell With Farmers, Your Polytunnel Devalues My House

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Heard Bill Wiggin MP protesting (farming today 0545 BBC R4 follow link) on behalf of people complaining about UK farmers trying to produce local food using polytunnels.

Saying that it’s OK, as long as they can’t be seen from their houses, as it devalues the price of their houses considerably.

So to hell with the food, buying local products and competing with Europe, the value of my house is more important !!!!!!!!!!!!.

Welcome to the countryside..................For townies who do not know it, milk comes from cows; they are the brown things that you can see walking round fields, Oh Yes, fields, they are normally green same colour as your lawn.

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I can't believe the mentality of some people,

I'm a townie, but if (when) I move to the country I'd want a polytunnel,

I think most of the townies want to live in some Kinkaid dreamland where locals swan around all day drinking cider going Oh Arh while leaning over a fence on the village green.

meanwhile they take little alice to school 20 miles away in their chelsea tractor and then pop in to the local parish meeting to tell everyone how they can make a better job than the locals have been doing for the last 200 years.

If I wasn't a townie my self I would say burn them all in a huge wicker 4x4,

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I'm a townie, but if (when) I move to the country I'd want a polytunnel,

I don't think he's talking about a small domestic polytunnel that a lot of people (including me) have for their tomato plants.

Rural polytunnels tend to be industrial-scale, and are about increasing yields for farmers, who got on perfectly well without them for countless millennia. The odd one here or there is no problem, but when you get an entire hillside covered in them, they are indeed a terrible blight on the landscape. Horrible visual pollution.

It's all about quality of life. Imagine moving into a rural home with a lovely view of a hill next to your house. Now imagine a week later it becomes covered with steel and plastic. Tell me that you would be perfectly happy with that.

It's a shame that the argument was reduced to house values (I didn't hear it, but am just going on what the OP says) but as a quality of life issue, then yes, the MP is absolutely right. There are some parts of Spain where entire rural regions are now covered in ugly plastic. It's truly awful to see. (There are other issues as well, like the imbalance these developments cause in the local environment, with wildlife and bird populations suddenly deprived of their traditional habitat.)

Edited by brassfarthing

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It's all about quality of life. Imagine moving into a rural home with a lovely view of a hill next to your house. Now imagine a week later it becomes covered with steel and plastic. Tell me that you would be perfectly happy with that.

It depends on whether you consider the countryside to be a working environment or a holiday camp for the rich.

I work in the Cotswolds, where entire villages are now owned solely as second homes by people in London. They spend their time complaining about church bells, animals and tractors impeding their range rovers as they drive to Waitrose.

I am happy to see farming in the countryside, and anyone who buys a house next to a farm should expect farming to occur. Note that farming no longer involves a man with a flat cap walking behind 2 oxen.

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reminds me of a wind turbine they hae in Gloucestershire(near to where my parents live). The locals went insane over 1 being put up. They made a leaflet full of things that might happen..such as the rotor falling off, sliding down the hill and possibly killing someone!!! These people even chained themselves to it! AGAIN IT WAS ONLY ONE!

it's that typical NIMBY attitude. idiots

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People with that view obviously cannot see further than their own noses. Another classic case of really annoying NIMBYism, and a crowd of people who think that because they have a little more money than everyone else, the world owes them something.

Farmers are lucky to have the technology to greatly reduce the chances of a crop failure - good for those who use it!

These prats must undersand that farming is a food production business with some "ugly" sides to it - both in agriculture and stock farming, not a career that is focused on making the countryside look pretty.

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It depends on whether you consider the countryside to be a working environment or a holiday camp for the rich.

I work in the Cotswolds, where entire villages are now owned solely as second homes by people in London. They spend their time complaining about church bells, animals and tractors impeding their range rovers as they drive to Waitrose.

I am happy to see farming in the countryside, and anyone who buys a house next to a farm should expect farming to occur. Note that farming no longer involves a man with a flat cap walking behind 2 oxen.

Totally agree. I lived in a village for eight years and made a point of integrating with the locals, most of who’s families had lived there for generations. The influx of City dwellers we’re never seen at the village shop, Pub, Hall etc. The only time you ever heard from them was when they wanted to complain – and then (of course) about something which only affected them!

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Our island is too crowded to accomodate all these competing self interests, when people have to live cheek by jowel. The problem is overcrowding in an over populated island.

Quality of life will not be improved by an open door immigration policy, designed to keep wages down, it will though result in shortages of housing, destruction of the countryside, traffic congestion and water shortages to name just a few issues. Add into that heady mix, a destruction of social cohesion by an increased factional conflict along racial and religious lines and the long term problem becomes obvious.

Unfortunately its an unstoppable force that has been unleashed, the pressure is building all the time. The problem will truly erupt when some external event, such as lack of oil or global warming final tip the balance and it will suddenly dawn on people that this opportunistic rush for economic growth and globalisation hasn't been fully thought through. Add into that Nu Labours dream of creating an unaffordable 'socialist' paradise for the entire world to enjoy and the whole thing is doomed.

Quality of life and making it sustainable is being ignored.

Here endeth my doom-mongering for the day ...... oh, and by the way, house prices are still rising and asking prices in particular are moving up faster than has been the case in the last 2-3 years where I live.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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