Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

libitina

High St V Internet

Recommended Posts

I just ordered a camcorder online for £130 less than Currys are selling it for and £90 less than Jessops (closest ad match they'll offer on it). Jessops were lovely and helpful and obviously knew their stuff, which is why I settled on the camera of my choice.

Question is, why do people shop on the High street anymore other than to go see what something looks like in real life?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just ordered a camcorder online for £130 less than Currys are selling it for and £90 less than Jessops (closest ad match they'll offer on it). Jessops were lovely and helpful and obviously knew their stuff, which is why I settled on the camera of my choice.

Question is, why do people shop on the High street anymore other than to go see what something looks like in real life?

Camcorders are fragile and sophisticated pieces of equiptment, so if it goes wrong it's far easier to take it back to a high street store. Also people often need post sale advice on features/ peripherals etc., although equally anyone with net savvy can get advice in forums and the like.

I'm surprised Jessops couldn't get closer than that, I used to work for them and head office approved 90% of price matches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is risky buying from the internet. Most sellers are honest, but there are dishonest elements. If the gadget you bought through the net from these dodgy sellers becomes faulty after a while, you can kiss your money good bye. Also, it is a big hassle writing or even calling many of the reputed internet sellers, if you have to return the item, the postage and packing is lost- because, most people would not like to go with the stress. That is why good highstreet shops are still important. for eg: I bought a sony camcorder through ebay. After 7-8 months, it became faulty. No way can I contact seller. sony would not take charge. I have the faulty camcorder to remind me of the dangers of e-shopping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate what you're both saying, but I have been shopping on the net for many years now and I'm aware of the potential pitfalls and do my best to avoid them. I understand that no method is completely foolproof. Last major purchase I had, I got through Currys and had major problems with their customer service. These were eventually sorted out, via several letters, going into the store was a waste of time, they couldn't give a stuff and tried to wriggle out of their legal obligations. The retailer I have used this time I have researched and I paid via CC, so any problem is Mr Visa's, not mine.

If only more people did proper research (and on house purchases too for that matter ;) ) then prices in the High st would have to come down eventually.

I have bought loads of stuff from ebay and been happy with it (well, apart from one or two maybe), but I wouldn't make a big -for me anyway- purchase like this through them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I'm not criticising you in the slightest, for a £90 saving I'd have done the same- I was just answering your (rhetorical?) question about why people buy on the high street any more. I'm glad you said that Jessops were nice to you- I had my problems with the way they ran the company when I was there, but one thing I never argued with was their absolute focus on customer service. I'll be sorry if they go down the tube. I was an assistant manager and had to put up with loads of head office crap, but if I could strike a deal with a customer to sell them the camera they needed at a price that was fair, having taken half an hour to talk them through all the options, I went home on a real high. I once sold a retired couple a £500 digital camera, and they came back the next week saying that they couldn't get it to work with their computer. I'd slightly misinterpreted Jessops return policy- since they had slightly scratched it I thought we couldn't offer them a refund, but instead I offered to pop round after work and have a go at their computer myself.

In the meantime I reread our policy and found out that in fact an incompatibility meant we would offer a no-strings attached refund. Anyway, I kept the appointment and went round (in my own time, I wasn't geting paid for it). I told them before I started that if I failed they could in fact have a refund, but then after half an hour I did get it working properly. In the meantime they gave me a glass of wine and chatted about the work they did with an organisation that sends retired but capable people around the world to use their skills in developing countries. I couldn't really ask for more job satisfaction than that :).

On the flipside, since I left I've not gone home shaking with rage having had to deal with a real arsehole in the shop either, which happened often enough.

I dunno. I often think that the way this country is going is shit, I don't want all our jobs going abroad or becoming call centre and warehouse based, but then I myself do very little to change things. I should really buy all my shopping in the corner shop rather than Tescos, but that's a few quid extra a week that I could be spending on beer. Dammit, isn't there a government to sort it all out for me? :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the future of business is a combination of highstreet sales and e business. If a reputed firm does e sales, we do not have a major objection to buying from them if the service/refund policy is good. However, there is nothing to replace a good knowledgeable salesperson telling you what is good and what is not. I feel that the high streets should start pricing in realistic terms, forgetting the huge profits. Saying that, internet sales is cheap for the company in real terms as it reduces the number of people involved, saving in salary and rents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the future of business is a combination of highstreet sales and e business. If a reputed firm does e sales, we do not have a major objection to buying from them if the service/refund policy is good. However, there is nothing to replace a good knowledgeable salesperson telling you what is good and what is not. I feel that the high streets should start pricing in realistic terms, forgetting the huge profits. Saying that, internet sales is cheap for the company in real terms as it reduces the number of people involved, saving in salary and rents.

How many big chain stores with cheap prices have staff that are knowledgable aboout the product? Not very many. The chains don't pay them enough to care either.

And with High st rents rising, how many independent shops can afford to set up business on the high st?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm perfectly happy ordering online, and have been doing so for years.

To counter some of the examples above, I recently bought a TV from a 'proper' shop, thinking that it was an expensive item so it would be good to have some after-sales service. When I got the TV home I discovered that I could hear a high-pitched noise, like a transformer, which was clearly audible to me. Very few other people could hear it until I put it on standby and pointed it out to them.

When I complained about this they said to bring it in... lo and behold, against the background noise of the shop they couldn't hear a thing. I had the option of sending it back to Panasonic for a month but they concluded that Panny would probably say they can't hear anything either.

So basically I didn't get any benefit from buying in the shop whatsoever. When I came to buy the rest of my crap - sub, speakers, xbox 360, amp, squeezebox, cables, laptop etc, it was all via online. I do all my research carefully so I know what I want... the only reason to visit a shop now is to see the item (and test it in some cases) before I buy online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The products online are usually what is known as Grey Imports, in most cases they are similar to the UK product, but very often there are components that are specific to a certain country.

When used in the UK, electrical products mostly, they are void of any Guarantee.

In addition, Companies such as Sony dump their products onto wholesalers in bulk when the product does not fully satisfy their Quality Control, often the fault is small, like a scratch, in other cases the product has failed on say the circuit board tests.

So Caveat Emptor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I order a fair bit on-line, and usually find it quick and reliable, but I do stick to the tried and trusted names. I've only had to return a couple of items. Recently sent back a pair of Sony in-ear headphones to Amazon, which fell apart after about 9 months use. The returns section of their website is a bit tricky to navigate, but having posted a complaint, I got replacement goods within a day or two, and just used the packaging to send the duff stuff back. Very efficient. Obviously, larger products are more difficult, I had a to send a duff computer back to Evesham once, which was a pain through having to also deal with the couriers. Got sorted alright in the end, though.

Re getting advice from sales staff, generally a waste of time IMO, (though there are notable exceptions, eg some independent hi-fi or photographic outlets like Jessops, as already mentioned). There's plenty of scope for research on the web, whether it's 'stuff', services or financial and investment information - this site for example for the latter. For 'stuff' I generally short list on this, then try and scope out the real article, just for size and 'real world' look and feel.

TLM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought this PC online from Dell ..... After Care is first class and the problems I had with it were sorted quickly and easily .....

I give the High Street another 10 years at best !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got back from PC world (don't tell my hubby, he just likes to walk around it saying' HOW MUCH?!?!' at the top of his voice) bought a webcam for £22 after reserving it online. Would have been £35 if I hadn't taken 5 mins to check their website.

Will mean I can keep hubby happy whilst he's away ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just ordered a camcorder online for £130 less than Currys are selling it for and £90 less than Jessops (closest ad match they'll offer on it). Jessops were lovely and helpful and obviously knew their stuff, which is why I settled on the camera of my choice.

Question is, why do people shop on the High street anymore other than to go see what something looks like in real life?

Jessops are pretty good and they seem to have a company policy of recruiting mostly camera enthusiasts, while most retailers seem to delight in NOT having people that know much about the products but who will use some blunt sales training to flog the company credit card or extra warranties (Dixons anyone?).

What i find about the highstreet now is just how few products they have on display or in stock. On camcorders, Jessops seem to keep just one or two models from each manufacturer (usually the very cheap models) and everything else is to order. On cameras they never seem to have more than one or two lenses in stock anymore.

Seems some bean counter has cleverly found out that cheapo point'n'clickers sell the most and has therefore banned better equipment with slower stockturns from the shelves.

I believe the bland chainstore highstreet will literally die off in the next decade and enthusiast-run specialist shops will re-emerge to fill the need for real advice not catered for by online mail order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I only buy expensive electrical stuff online. Set top boxes etc i don't bother, i get them local. When i wanted a new vacuum i wanted a reliable one, and have been put off dyson. I opted for a sebo, but partly because they have a five year on parts automatically. I find all the reviews on the internet really useful, because people are really honest with their opinions, so you can find out about the product and the supplier which you can't do on the high street, and i saved £50 on price inc delivery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main problem I have with buying online is that it's such a hassle to get things delivered. Books and DVDs aren't a problem as the postman just sticks them through the letter-box, but when they want to send it by courier and the courier can deliver at any time of day, the only choice I have is to get it delivered to work and hope it doesn't go missing...

That said, the last 'big' thing I bought in a retail store was a new hard disk when my system disk started failing: I didn't want to have to wait a few days to replace it. I bought my HDTV camcorder online, but made sure it was a place where I could drive over and pick it up as I didn't fancy having 4000 pounds worth of camera shipped to me.

Of course since I rent I don't have to buy furniture and other big and expensive junk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought my HDTV camcorder online, but made sure it was a place where I could drive over and pick it up as I didn't fancy having 4000 pounds worth of camera shipped to me.

Wow, mines only 1/10th of the price of yours - though I didn't pay high st prices- and I thought that was a lot. What do you use it for? (and don't say filming :P )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What do you use it for?

Low-budget movies, mostly: though I haven't used it half as much as I expected due to the pound crashing in the last year... I need the money for buying a house in Canada instead.

On the plus side, it's still selling for the same price as it did last year, so I haven't lost much by not waiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main problem I have with buying online is that it's such a hassle to get things delivered. Books and DVDs aren't a problem as the postman just sticks them through the letter-box, but when they want to send it by courier and the courier can deliver at any time of day, the only choice I have is to get it delivered to work and hope it doesn't go missing...

But that's the same for high street shops too, unless you have a car.

The online retailers, in my experience, tend to be more efficient at delivery as it's their only channel.

Something I bought from Dixons (or was it Curry's?) recently arrived on time... except it was a more expensive but incomplete item, addressed to somebody else entirely and post-marked from 1 year before. :lol:

I got them to take it back and re-ordered it from a 'proper' retailer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just got back from PC world (don't tell my hubby, he just likes to walk around it saying' HOW MUCH?!?!' at the top of his voice) bought a webcam for £22 after reserving it online. Would have been £35 if I hadn't taken 5 mins to check their website.

Will mean I can keep hubby happy whilst he's away

Let me know when he has gone, and I will pop round and install it for you :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last trip to Tesco has convinced me to buy online from now on! half term families and halfwits all meandering along......drives me mad. Online for Tesco from now on, and thats only cos my local shops are crap otherwise I'd go there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last trip to Tesco has convinced me to buy online from now on! half term families and halfwits all meandering along......drives me mad. Online for Tesco from now on, and thats only cos my local shops are crap otherwise I'd go there.

Don't forget to trawl the net for free delivery codes. They're always out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the future of business is a combination of highstreet sales and e business. If a reputed firm does e sales, we do not have a major objection to buying from them if the service/refund policy is good. However, there is nothing to replace a good knowledgeable salesperson telling you what is good and what is not. I feel that the high streets should start pricing in realistic terms, forgetting the huge profits. Saying that, internet sales is cheap for the company in real terms as it reduces the number of people involved, saving in salary and rents.

"However, there is nothing to replace a good knowledgeable salesperson telling you what is good and what is not"

I agree. How could we do without those knowledgable salespeople at PC World! :)

Low-budget movies, mostly: though I haven't used it half as much as I expected due to the pound crashing in the last year... I need the money for buying a house in Canada instead.

On the plus side, it's still selling for the same price as it did last year, so I haven't lost much by not waiting.

Is that a SonyZ1 MarkG? What are you editing with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a SonyZ1 MarkG? What are you editing with?

Avid Xpress Pro HD. Works pretty well on the whole, though it's like editing DV on a PII-300.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sony/ Apple/ Nike model seems to be the way forward - the shop is for advertising & showing off your products, then who cares where you buy it. Retail as a marketing cost

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.