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Reforming Tenancy Laws?

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I think the best way to resolve the current standoff between protecting tenants and landlords rights would be to allow for longer fixed terms, and longer notice periods to be enforced (if voluntarily agreed by both parties in the contract).

But it should be made far easier for landlords to remove problem tenants (if they are a genuine problem) and far easier for tenants to get out of the agreement if the landlord dosen't keep their side of the contract.

Surely that would be good for landlords and tenants?

As a tenant (a good tenant anyway) it would mean that:

  • You could have a flexible length fixed term
  • You could have a particular length notice period (given by landlord to gain possession)
  • You could get out of a tenancy agreement if the landlord dosen't fix things or keep his side of the contract

As a landlord it would mean that:

  • You could remove problem tenants far more easily

A winner all round surely??

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The reason the UK has such high OOers is that renting sucks (your words non ftb)

In certain other countries people feel secure as a tenant, and can look at the property as their home. They can then get on with their lives.

Much of this and certain other countries HPI problems revolve around this.

Germany has a low OO % and doesnt have a severe housing problem, but does anyone really believe the Germans are less possessive? If you do you havnt been on holiday and tried to get a sunbed.

This countries tenancy laws have a lot to answer for.

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Renting does suck in the UK and we have Thatcher to blame for that.

She got rid of the Rent Act 1977 which protected tenants from eviction and

also regulated rents so that Landlords could only charge a "fair" rent.

Assured shortholds were introduced as discretionary in 1987 and then became

the norm in 1997.

Renting was much more common under the Rent Acts which we had for many

years after the wars and significant numbers of people were happy to rent

from the relatively large professional landlords of the past. We now have a

system where loads of small one and two bit landlords rent out properties

to tenants who they can evict without any reason.

In essence, however evicting them is not completely straightforward. It

requires a two month notie, followed by an application to court for a possession

order followed by a bailiffs warrant to evict. All of which can take up to 6 months.

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The reason the UK has such high OOers is that renting sucks (your words non ftb)

In certain other countries people feel secure as a tenant, and can look at the property as their home. They can then get on with their lives.

Much of this and certain other countries HPI problems revolve around this.

Germany has a low OO % and doesnt have a severe housing problem, but does anyone really believe the Germans are less possessive? If you do you havnt been on holiday and tried to get a sunbed.

This countries tenancy laws have a lot to answer for.

Yep, my words.

But it sucks only because:

  • landlords can be very unprofessional, and not provide any kind of decent service

  • You can be chucked out at 2 months notice after 6 months

If we had security of tenure but still could move out at a months notice then it'd be a lot better.

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I agree with the general idea, but I think you need to take on board the fact that the govt wants to avoid a situation where tenants can be evicted too easily, because the govt is the landlord of last resort. They'll do anything to avoid having to house people including stepping all over LL's rights to do that.

However I personally believe that a more flexible situation would result in more cempetition from LL's and therefore cheaper rents which wouldn't be a bad thing.

But Labour is so good at reducing competition, so expect rents to rise with the new laws now in force and the new planned laws as well.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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