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Wife and I are thinking of getting involved with sposoring a child

Anyone doing this, and which organizations can you recommend ?

We prefer a more personalized sponsorship, where the funds go directly to the child and not to some charity director's bonus for the year

Would very much appreciate any advice

Moderator : understand this is well off-topic, please feel free to move it after a day on main board. thanks.

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Wife and I are thinking of getting involved with sposoring a child

Anyone doing this, and which organizations can you recommend ?

We prefer a more personalized sponsorship, where the funds go directly to the child and not to some charity director's bonus for the year

Would very much appreciate any advice

Moderator : understand this is well off-topic, please feel free to move it after a day on main board. thanks.

I have looked into this in the past and I too wanted a more personal approach. At the time the charity I spoke to didn't cover the countries I was interested in (TBH it was such a long time ago I can't recall which one).

In the end I decided to donate to the NSPCC.

I am now looking at stopping that as I don't like how the money is being spent (too much on advertising and promoting rather than direct work with children and families). I also don't like the nature of the adverts and campaigns.

You have jogged my memory and I may look into this again so anything you find out would be interesting.

One thing to remember is that children do not live/grow in isolation. They need schools/clean water/adults to support them and employment/life opportunities. Depending on where you want to sponsor the child it may be better to support the local infastructure rather than an individual child.

I do remember that the charity only wanted money to pay for the childs upkeep and education. Although they encouraged letters they did not allow you to send presents or personal gifts/donations to the individual child.

Another thing to think about is that it is not just children that need help. There are many elderly people in developing countries who are destitute because of poor health care and lack of government welfare support. Giving direct sponsorship to one of these people may have a much bigger impact on the individual.

All good stuff - I would be interested to know how you get on.

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Wife and I are thinking of getting involved with sposoring a child

Anyone doing this, and which organizations can you recommend ?

We prefer a more personalized sponsorship, where the funds go directly to the child and not to some charity director's bonus for the year

Would very much appreciate any advice

Moderator : understand this is well off-topic, please feel free to move it after a day on main board. thanks.

Try 'World Vision' - we sponsor through them and have been pleased. To be honest it is a big NGO and no doubt they have one or two too many shiny white Landcruisers in the field. But they do generally work and are reputable. To go more 'personal' you have to go through smaller organisations which can be more hit and miss.

Here is the link - http://www.sponsor-children.org.uk/world_vision.htm

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http://www.plan-uk.org/

Plan is a child sponsorship organisation which has been running since 1937 (helping children caught up in the Spanish Civil War originally), and they're not affiliated to any religion, which may or may not be important to you. They seem pretty good - the company I work for is supporting them at the moment to provide funds to refurbish a school in Ghana.

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My main concern is that the money will be misdirected - charities have become big business now, and I want to know that our money will be put to good use.

I understand that the infrastructure in a certain country also needs to be improved in order to make a difference to the child's life, and we would be willing to donate something more to contribute to this, but what we are really looking for is a connection to one or two individual children where we can see a direct difference to their personal circumstances as a result of our sponsorship.

Perhaps that sounds a bit egotistical but It's the we want to do it.

We donate here and there but nothing really regular, and I'm interested in giving something back where we can - I guess some will say that I am appeasing my middle class feelings of guilt, or whatever - maybe they are right, as I get older I do feel more and more blessed and outright lucky with the life i have been given

I browsed a few sites, Save The Children, WorldVision etc, but have not yet decided which one we will go with

will post more re this as I find more,

thanks for those

Plan is a child sponsorship organisation which has been running since 1937 (helping children caught up in the Spanish Civil War originally), and they're not affiliated to any religion, which may or may not be important to you. They seem pretty good - the company I work for is supporting them at the moment to provide funds to refurbish a school in Ghana.

Wife and I are practicing Christians - she Catholic me Orthodox.

No qualms if they are not affiliated to any religion, just don't want to support any organization which actively works AGAINST our beliefs

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Well you have pulled at my heartstrings/jogged my memory/focused my attention (delete as appropriate).

I have just sponsored a child with worldvision - don;t have the time at the moment to do lots of research so I just went for worldvision as I think they are reputable.

I think I will sponsor another child/elderly person/project later in the year when I have more time to look into it again.

£18 a month to make a difference is good value IMO.

That's my good deed for the day

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If you donate anything to charity, make sure you do it tax effeciently. I.e. make sure the charity can claim the tax back on your donations. I don't think they can claim back tax on cash donations!

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I have spoken to my local council about mentoring children. I presume this will be possible wherever you are.

The idea is to spend a few hours a week with difficult or as I would prefer, fostered children. As I was fostered myself for 13 years, I could relate to them quite easily. The main reason I wasn't a rascal was because I enjoyed sport so much.And so i'd try to get them into a sport such as squash or gym work.

Although I wouldn't be donating any money(except paying for sports sessions) I'm sure that they would learn a lot from my experiences as a fostered child and see that being fostered shouldn't always be seen as something negative.

Maybe worth considering if you can spare sny time. I have just started a new job which means I sometimes leave late. Hopefully within a year I will have a few spare hours.

Good for you anyway. Get in touch with your local council and see if they can help you.

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I am assuming that as you are a visitor to this site, you are probably considering sponsoring a child rather than actually buying one as you are worried that child prices are going to crash. Please let me allay your fears - children can still be bought very cheaply from third world countries and can make good little workers.

Sponsoring a child is just putting money into somebody elses coffers - you are much better off actually buying one and will soon see returns on your investment as child price inflation continues to go through the roof. Don't let Dr. Bubb tell you otherwise!

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Why don't you buy a home and consider it advance sponsorship for a child of your own?

Already got one of those

I am assuming that as you are a visitor to this site, you are probably considering sponsoring a child rather than actually buying one as you are worried that child prices are going to crash. Please let me allay your fears - children can still be bought very cheaply from third world countries and can make good little workers.

Sponsoring a child is just putting money into somebody elses coffers - you are much better off actually buying one and will soon see returns on your investment as child price inflation continues to go through the roof. Don't let Dr. Bubb tell you otherwise!

there's always one...

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I am assuming that as you are a visitor to this site, you are probably considering sponsoring a child rather than actually buying one as you are worried that child prices are going to crash. Please let me allay your fears - children can still be bought very cheaply from third world countries and can make good little workers.

Sponsoring a child is just putting money into somebody elses coffers - you are much better off actually buying one and will soon see returns on your investment as child price inflation continues to go through the roof. Don't let Dr. Bubb tell you otherwise!

I wonder how long until you are labelled a troll?

:rolleyes:

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We, apparently, pay for 2 lads education in a remote spot in Uganda. I say 'apparently' because the amount we pay (think it is £130 a year per child) seems insanely small. We do it through a church charity attached to my youngest son's CofE school. They also go around doing very weird things like training the clergy - but I checked at the recent annual meeting of the charity that the money you pay for the children's education is ringfenced for that and not for building churches.

The kids, by all accounts, are desperate to be educated and take it all very seriously. Some of them cycle miles (like over 20 miles) to get to school each day - across rough bush.

When I think of my eldest sons blase attitude as I wasted best part of 10k a year on his education ....

I'd try and find a small charity if I were you. The one I contribute to ... some of the people go out there couple of times a year (at their own expense) and help build extensions to the school etc. So you know the money is not going on flash brochures, salaries, land rovers etc. I think they do a great job, shame about the preaching that seems to go with it though.

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Charity colonialism is harmful and places like Africa will never sort itself out until all these charities, ngo's and foreign aid workers clear off and mind their own business. If you give money to themyou are just perpetuating a cycle of exploitation. If you want to do something to help the third world, lobby the EU to adopt fair trade rules.

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Charity colonialism is harmful and places like Africa will never sort itself out until all these charities, ngo's and foreign aid workers clear off and mind their own business. If you give money to themyou are just perpetuating a cycle of exploitation. If you want to do something to help the third world, lobby the EU to adopt fair trade rules.

That's why you need to check out what Sport Relief is doing. They have gone into all these issues in great depth.

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We sponsor a child in Zambia through Worldvision. The key point to remember is that your money contribute to the wellbeing of the entire village as well as to the individual child by helping to provide clean water, school facilities.

Contrary to what Dog says, I don't believe it is the sort of charity that promotes dependency, rather it is a small amount of money that can have a major impact on the quality of life and future for a large number of children.

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Charity colonialism is harmful and places like Africa will never sort itself out until all these charities, ngo's and foreign aid workers clear off and mind their own business. If you give money to themyou are just perpetuating a cycle of exploitation. If you want to do something to help the third world, lobby the EU to adopt fair trade rules.

In a way I agree with you about the dependency bit. BUT these kids are only kids and if the country it going to sort itself out it needs some sort of future.

Some of these countries couldn't give a sh1t about their population. Withholding money won't make them think 'oh let's stop fighting/spending all our revenue on guns and palaces etc etc' ...they don't give a toss because they are consumed with power and greed. Look at what happend to the population in Iraq when the world put sanctions in place. SH carried on regardless - he couldn't care less about the kids dying from lack of medical care etc.

Sponsorship covers a range of countries who have diverse problems caused by famine, civil unrest and economic problems but I do think that in every case change needs to come from within and that will only happen if there is a fit and educated generation to push change through.

There needs to be a two way approach - global change in reducing third world debt and also supporting the next generation - I don't think one on there own would make much difference.

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Contrary to what Dog says, I don't believe it is the sort of charity that promotes dependency, rather it is a small amount of money that can have a major impact on the quality of life and future for a large number of children.

Agree, there is always an excuse for NOT doing something - you have a chance to do something small which can make a big change to someone, so do it

I do not believe that this 'neo-colonialism' is the real problem here - I think corruption and mismanagement are the main issues which need to be tackled, and that can only be done by a healthy and well educated new generation.

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Agree, there is always an excuse for NOT doing something - you have a chance to do something small which can make a big change to someone, so do it

I do not believe that this 'neo-colonialism' is the real problem here - I think corruption and mismanagement are the main issues which need to be tackled, and that can only be done by a healthy and well educated new generation.

I am not saying don't do anything. It is just that these charities are not the answer.

Invest in third world businesses, buy third world products but don't give the money to these charities. They are a menace and most of them are just perpetuating poverty. A very famous charity last year had to admit that less than 8 pence in the pound ends up being used on good causes.

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Guest muttley

I am not saying don't do anything. It is just that these charities are not the answer.

Invest in third world businesses, buy third world products but don't give the money to these charities. They are a menace and most of them are just perpetuating poverty. A very famous charity last year had to admit that less than 8 pence in the pound ends up being used on good causes.

There are many charities operating on a local level that are crying out for donations.

My wife and I have been involved with a local charity that brings 7-11 yo children from areas of Belarus affected by the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. Fund raising is always a problem, mainly because much of the local money goes to a Hospice and the hospital scanner fund (worthwhile charities that they are).

There are many, much smaller charities, that are run by volunteers where even modest donations can make a massive difference.

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Guest Winners and Losers

I am assuming that as you are a visitor to this site, you are probably considering sponsoring a child rather than actually buying one as you are worried that child prices are going to crash. Please let me allay your fears - children can still be bought very cheaply from third world countries and can make good little workers.

Sponsoring a child is just putting money into somebody elses coffers - you are much better off actually buying one and will soon see returns on your investment as child price inflation continues to go through the roof. Don't let Dr. Bubb tell you otherwise!

Better still you could rent one out. :rolleyes:

I wonder how long until you are labelled a troll?

:rolleyes:

Or a 'Monkey'?

I see you are using the rolleyes alot TTRTR. :rolleyes:

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why not sponsor a dog from the ncdl ?

they never put a healthy dog down and according to the tv ad, some of the dogs can even talk and write letters. signed with a paw print (ahh). i nearly cried when max told me how his owners left him out in the rain.

give them a call on woof woof 800 woof woof one. bark.

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