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laurejon

Id Cards, Can They Be Trusted?

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How many times have we hear the defence of ID's cards when put to them that they make big mistakes.

How about this, concrete evidence Government is not responsible enough to hold the publics personal information. How many innocent people would be shot at tube stations after reading this!!!.

The Home Office is under renewed pressure after admitting that hundreds of people had wrongly been labelled as criminals due to errors by the Criminal Records Bureau.

The disclosure that more than 2,000 people had been affected by the problem came as ministers and officials continued to grapple with the fall-out from the foreign prisoners deportation fiasco.

To add to their difficulties it emerged that an immigration official had been suspended over allegations that he offered to help a teenage asylum seeker with her application in return for sex.

And it was disclosed that 232 foreign nationals arrested in counter terrorism operations had been been allowed to remain in Britain as asylum seekers - including 18 who had only applied for refugee status following their arrest.

It is all likely to ensure that Home Secretary John Reid will face a rough ride when he appears this week before the Commons Home Affairs Committee for the first time in his new role.

Shadow home secretary David Davis said that the Home Office was guilty of "serial incompetence" while Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Nick Clegg said that public confidence in the department had finally ebbed away.

According to the Mail on Sunday which broke the story, the errors by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) led to ordinary people - from court ushers to students - wrongly identified as pornographers, thieves and violent robbers. In some cases, the paper said, people had been turned down for jobs or university places.

The Home Office took a defiant line - describing the errors as "regrettable" but insisting that no mistakes had been made and refusing to apologise.

Mr Davis said that the Home Office was becoming the "ministry of injustice" and demanded that ministers accept responsibility for the CRB's failings.

"The refusal of ministers to face up to their own responsibility and to allow this dreadful practice to continue is not just a failure to do their duty; it is a willingness to perpetuate a serial injustice," he said.

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Looks like big brother got it wrong then :lol: ! I hate Labour so much I could puke :angry: . Useless, incompetent offspring of chavs !!! :angry: :angry: :angry:

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Sure the government can do as they want and you will see no accountability because they are judge, police and jury and all the three main parties do is argue about who gets to pocket the proceeds of crime and the BBC wants it’s cut via licence fees.

We are well on our way towards a police state and whist you may think police are stopping people to look for drugs or stop terrorists what they are doing is looking for a bold tier or an out of date tax disk and they think they have hit the jack pot if they catch you after half a pint of beer.

Do you think your local drug pusher will look after you in your old age and pay up when it comes to pensions or will you just not count.

The police have become the thugs protecting the state and this goes back to the Thatcher years, ID cards just makes the job easier.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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