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Eager FTB

I've Been Laid Off

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:( I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I worked in the printing trade and have seen orders all but vanish at the firm where I worked.

I suppose this is an effect of the economy in a downturn, the print trade is usually one of the first to suffer after retail when things get tight.

Looks like the house deposit will have to bee used to live on for a while :angry:

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:( I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I worked in the printing trade and have seen orders all but vanish at the firm where I worked.

I suppose this is an effect of the economy in a downturn, the print trade is usually one of the first to suffer after retail when things get tight.

Looks like the house deposit will have to bee used to live on for a while :angry:

A necessarary side effect or the HPC to be. Unlucky, you wont eb the last.

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Sorry to hear your news, mate.

If you work in the printing trade and you expect things to get worse, have you thought about retraining to do something else?

Wish you the best.

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Sorry to hear your news, mate.

If you work in the printing trade and you expect things to get worse, have you thought about retraining to do something else?

Wish you the best.

Thanks, I have been for a couple of jobs with a view to retraining/different career path, the only trouble is they are generally not too interested when they see that my main skills are print based :o Ill keep trying though!!

My mate was laid off 5 weeks ago. He too is in the printing trade. Luckily he is still at home with his parents. Lincoln may have adopted London's house prices but the wages around here are sh1t.

Sorry to hear that I know how he must feel. I was at home with my parents but moved to rented a couple of months ago. Luckily my parents are quite helpful and have offered to let me come back if I need to. I only rent from a mate so I have no tenancy agreement to worry about.

I agree about wages, Leeds has huge house prices but wages are cr@p most jobs are around £6ph.

Edited by Eager FTB

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I hope you find something soon. Have you thought about Germany? Things are starting to boom over there.

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Hi Eager FTB

I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I am sorry to hear your bad news. Try to look at the bright side, while you are away training for a new job house prices will be coming down more than you would have been earning !!

If you want job security then do something that can’t be outsourced abroad. Plumbers and plasters make a fortune !! They say not but I have never seen a poor one, a bit like farmers !! :lol:

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Sorry to hear it :(

I work in Print also (Reprographics) but we are sorta quite lucky. Our customers are PZ Cussons, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, Colgate, BP Castol and Texaco. All big name players.

The Oil guys are hard to predict as they will be making more money from the $per Barrel but lose it in sales as the price of their product is also more expensive.

Colgate are moving abroad but we hope to keep some of the work. Nonetheless we have branches in Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Poland, Russia so even if it is out-sourced we can compete globally.

P&G and Unilever are BIG!!! They could squeeze us for price and then its probably game over for me :(

UK Print is phucked tbh. We are not competitive compared to eastern Europe. The fact we are global is the only reason I am still working.

Good luck in whatever you do

TB

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Really sorry to hear about that EFTB.

How about this? Still working with paper :lol: (sorry not a time to be facetious)

Leeds City Council (www.leeds.gov.uk - click on vacanies link on right)

Salary: £20,895 - £22,293

Reference: 2824

Department: City Services

Closing Date: 25 May 2006

Description

The Enforcement Division are looking to recruit 3 Litter Enforcement & School Liaison Officers to increase and intensify enforcement activity especially in and around schools, through a mix of education and formal action. There will be 3 temporary / secondment posts until March 2007 with a possibility of an extension.

PM me if you apply for an LCC job.

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:( I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I worked in the printing trade and have seen orders all but vanish at the firm where I worked.

I suppose this is an effect of the economy in a downturn, the print trade is usually one of the first to suffer after retail when things get tight.

Looks like the house deposit will have to bee used to live on for a while :angry:

Third time in how long? commercial Print trade has had it. try specialised print, security / labels etc.

Problem is, so many looking for the same jobs.

The company I’m working for now, had a list of over 100 applicants.

Realistically you've got to look outside the trade :(

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Journos I know at one of the biggest UK paper chains have been gradually let go in the past few months in dribsd and drabs so as not to make the headlines. Two journos I know are now working on a day by day no contract basis.

I also hear that ITV is in serious trouble - wasn't there a recent moneyweek article on it?

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:( I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I worked in the printing trade and have seen orders all but vanish at the firm where I worked.

I suppose this is an effect of the economy in a downturn, the print trade is usually one of the first to suffer after retail when things get tight.

Looks like the house deposit will have to bee used to live on for a while :angry:

Looks like Crash Gordon sold us out, South Florida is quite healthy even though houses are still priced too high.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/business/cont...bless_0520.html

Marc Mirabella can't wait to fill the empty cubicles in the Jupiter office of his technology-recruiting firm, but an ever-shrinking jobless rate isn't helping his cause.

There's plenty of business out there for his company, Oxford International, he said, but not enough workers.

"We need people — bad," said Mirabella, who runs the 50-person Florida office of Massachusetts-based Oxford.

Like many employers in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast, Mirabella struggles to fill empty desks as jobless figures keep setting records.

The unemployment rates in Palm Beach and Martin counties fell to 30-year lows in April, state officials said Friday.

In Palm Beach County, unemployment sank to 2.8 percent from 3 percent in March, according to the Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. That's the lowest since 1976, when state officials last overhauled the way they track the job market.

In Martin County, the jobless rate was 2.6 percent, down from 2.9 percent in March. And in St. Lucie County, the jobless rate remained 3.1 percent, tied for a record low.

For years, the region has been a perennial job growth juggernaut as the housing market fueled a boom in construction and construction-related jobs. But now, that demand seems to be feeding on itself — even as the housing market cools.

Employers of every ilk — from hotels to call centers to high-paying engineering firms — who had become used to having their pick of a growing labor force are forced to look at alternatives, including expanding to where the workers are — outside a state where the jobless rate fell to 3.0 percent in April, well below the national rate of 4.7 percent.

Recruiting methods expand

Workers, on the other hand, appear to be in the catbird seat.

In Palm Beach County, only 17,585 people were actively seeking work in April, while 609,615 workers were employed, state officials said.

That's good news for workers, who are beginning to get raises. The average weekly wage in Palm Beach County in the third quarter of last year was $768, up 6.7 percent from a year earlier, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

But the microscopic jobless rate doesn't make life any easier for employers like Mirabella, who wants to hire another 50 people. Oxford International places high-end tech workers with employers.

Landing a sales job at Oxford requires little more than a college degree and a good attitude, Mirabella said. Workers can make as much as $80,000 to $100,000 a year within a few years.

But the empty desks remain, so Mirabella recently hired a recruiting director to troll job fairs and college campuses. Oxford offers a $1,500 bonus to workers who refer job applicants who get hired.

At 401kExchange in Greenacres, President Fred Barstein faces similar difficulties in filling the 35 empty seats at his call center, where workers make $35,000 to $40,000 a year. Unable to hire employees here, Barstein is opening a call center in Utah, where wages are lower and, he hopes, workers more plentiful.

For higher-paid positions, Barstein has little choice but to let workers telecommute. He has top employees who work from their homes in Tampa, New Jersey and California.

"I'd rather have everybody here," Barstein said. "There is a lot lost by not being able to have people walk into your office and talk to you. But that's what you have to do to attract talent."

Other employers also are dangling incentives to workers who help recruit employees. At The Breakers in Palm Beach, employees get a $100 gift card to Publix for referring someone who lands a job at the resort.

And with jobless rates still dropping, The Breakers has begun sweetening the pot, spokeswoman Ann Margo Peart said. An employee who refers a chef or restaurant manager, for instance, gets a dinner for two at one of The Breakers' posh eateries. A worker who helps recruit a housekeeper receives two Breakers robes.

Employers revise thinking

The tight job market is forcing employers to offer more generous salaries and benefits, said Dawn Gill of Spherion, a Fort Lauderdale-based staffing firm.

"Employers are really changing the way they look at the workforce," Gill said.

Statewide, the professional and business services sector — think lawyers, accountants and people placed by staffing firms — continued to drive the job market in April, creating 59,100 jobs over the past year. The construction industry was next, adding 48,600 jobs.

But some warn that a cooling real estate market could translate to pain for construction workers, a group that has seen insatiable demand for its services. Jeff Spear, a home builder who's president of the Gold Coast Builders Association, predicts layoffs.

"A lot of builders are cutting back because sales are flat," Spear said.

For now, though, the good times are rolling. Every one of Florida's 67 counties had a lower unemployment rate than the national average of 4.7 percent.

The Panhandle's Walton County had the state's lowest jobless rate, 1.8 percent. Hendry County's 4.3 percent was the highest.

Edited by messychopper

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Eager FTB,

Good luck, three times - that sucks, doesn;t surprise me one bit though, there are whole industries that are turning turtle.

On the publishing front the ABC figs don't look good, then again looking at the price of titles on the newsstand it is hardly surprising, at £5 a pop probably will never buy another magazine regularly again.

http://www.mediatel.co.uk/abcroundup/

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/section/0,,1782,00.html

Looks like Crash Gordon sold us out, South Florida is quite healthy even though houses are still priced too high.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/business/cont...bless_0520.html

Marc Mirabella can't wait to fill the empty cubicles in the Jupiter office of his technology-recruiting firm, but an ever-shrinking jobless rate isn't helping his cause.

There's plenty of business out there for his company, Oxford International, he said, but not enough workers.

"We need people — bad," said Mirabella, who runs the 50-person Florida office of Massachusetts-based Oxford.

Like many employers in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast, Mirabella struggles to fill empty desks as jobless figures keep setting records.

The unemployment rates in Palm Beach and Martin counties fell to 30-year lows in April, state officials said Friday.

In Palm Beach County, unemployment sank to 2.8 percent from 3 percent in March, according to the Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation. That's the lowest since 1976, when state officials last overhauled the way they track the job market.

In Martin County, the jobless rate was 2.6 percent, down from 2.9 percent in March. And in St. Lucie County, the jobless rate remained 3.1 percent, tied for a record low.

For years, the region has been a perennial job growth juggernaut as the housing market fueled a boom in construction and construction-related jobs. But now, that demand seems to be feeding on itself — even as the housing market cools.

Employers of every ilk — from hotels to call centers to high-paying engineering firms — who had become used to having their pick of a growing labor force are forced to look at alternatives, including expanding to where the workers are — outside a state where the jobless rate fell to 3.0 percent in April, well below the national rate of 4.7 percent.

Recruiting methods expand

Workers, on the other hand, appear to be in the catbird seat.

In Palm Beach County, only 17,585 people were actively seeking work in April, while 609,615 workers were employed, state officials said.

That's good news for workers, who are beginning to get raises. The average weekly wage in Palm Beach County in the third quarter of last year was $768, up 6.7 percent from a year earlier, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

But the microscopic jobless rate doesn't make life any easier for employers like Mirabella, who wants to hire another 50 people. Oxford International places high-end tech workers with employers.

Landing a sales job at Oxford requires little more than a college degree and a good attitude, Mirabella said. Workers can make as much as $80,000 to $100,000 a year within a few years.

But the empty desks remain, so Mirabella recently hired a recruiting director to troll job fairs and college campuses. Oxford offers a $1,500 bonus to workers who refer job applicants who get hired.

At 401kExchange in Greenacres, President Fred Barstein faces similar difficulties in filling the 35 empty seats at his call center, where workers make $35,000 to $40,000 a year. Unable to hire employees here, Barstein is opening a call center in Utah, where wages are lower and, he hopes, workers more plentiful.

For higher-paid positions, Barstein has little choice but to let workers telecommute. He has top employees who work from their homes in Tampa, New Jersey and California.

"I'd rather have everybody here," Barstein said. "There is a lot lost by not being able to have people walk into your office and talk to you. But that's what you have to do to attract talent."

Other employers also are dangling incentives to workers who help recruit employees. At The Breakers in Palm Beach, employees get a $100 gift card to Publix for referring someone who lands a job at the resort.

And with jobless rates still dropping, The Breakers has begun sweetening the pot, spokeswoman Ann Margo Peart said. An employee who refers a chef or restaurant manager, for instance, gets a dinner for two at one of The Breakers' posh eateries. A worker who helps recruit a housekeeper receives two Breakers robes.

Employers revise thinking

The tight job market is forcing employers to offer more generous salaries and benefits, said Dawn Gill of Spherion, a Fort Lauderdale-based staffing firm.

"Employers are really changing the way they look at the workforce," Gill said.

Statewide, the professional and business services sector — think lawyers, accountants and people placed by staffing firms — continued to drive the job market in April, creating 59,100 jobs over the past year. The construction industry was next, adding 48,600 jobs.

But some warn that a cooling real estate market could translate to pain for construction workers, a group that has seen insatiable demand for its services. Jeff Spear, a home builder who's president of the Gold Coast Builders Association, predicts layoffs.

"A lot of builders are cutting back because sales are flat," Spear said.

For now, though, the good times are rolling. Every one of Florida's 67 counties had a lower unemployment rate than the national average of 4.7 percent.

The Panhandle's Walton County had the state's lowest jobless rate, 1.8 percent. Hendry County's 4.3 percent was the highest.

MessyChopper.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/blogs/content..._alabama_1.html

Same disease, different part of the cycle and differnt dynamics becuase the US has more space (usable and available) and options. Still, in some work areas the jobs are simply shipping out of the US altogether.

Basically people are shipping out as they have had enough - read the comments form the link too.

Home > Real Estate > Archives > 2006 > May > 19 > Entry

Sweet Home Alabama?

By Alexandra Clough | Friday, May 19, 2006, 03:03 PM

Vicki Graham is so out of here she’s got half her stuff packed. “I have one foot out the door,” she said.

Graham is moving to Alabama.

Graham and her family would been been gone by May 31, but Graham’s buyer backed out last month — on the day of the appraisal — leaving her standing at the altar of commerce.

Now Graham’s home is back on the market. And once again, she’s keeping the place tidy for those crucial weekend open houses.

But her eye is still firmly set on getting out of town. “We’re going to Alabama,” she said. “The schools, the taxes, the money, and I don’t want another hurricane season.”

Recent reports show public school enrollment is declining throughout South Florida. In Palm Beach County, for instance, forecasters expect a drop of about 500 student for the coming school year.

“Something is definitely going on,” said William Strong, a professor of economics at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. “Where are kids going, and why?”

Graham knows why. She’s had it with the crime, crowds and endless increases in everyday costs. Today it’s home insurance, tomorrow it’s taxes. Suddenly, South Florida isn’t looking like such a great place to raise a family after all.

But in Alabama, things seem different. “The girls look like girls. The boys look like boys,” Graham said. “We went to an open house up there. They had a sign: ‘The last person closest to 4 p.m., lock up when you leave.’ Here, they would have taken the appliances out.”

The decline of the middle class in Palm Beach County is a creeping syndrome. I chart the trend’s beginning when the shopping malls started doing away with reasonably-priced stores and started carting in Cartier. Soon the family restaurants gave way to places that never serve salad with an entree.

And now we’re at the point where housing is out of touch for many families — unless you like driving an hour or so to your job.

Yes, there are plenty of new homes being built and sold. But when homes sell for $300,000, $400,000 or more (and many of those are townhouses!) you can bet sellers aren’t marketing them to Orlando-area families. They’re selling to the only people who can afford them: Rich, retiring Baby Boomers.

And these folks don’t have children who need to enroll in public schools.

“People with children are selling, and people without children are buying,” Strong said.

I know many people, who, like Graham, have had enough. Tennessee. North Carolina. Alabama.

The same states, for the same reasons, are the new paradise for South Floridians.

Graham says she’s making some adjustments to her forced, extended stay in Palm Beach County.

Her immaculate 4 bedroom/2.5 bath home plus pool in Boynton Beach’s Nautica Sound is priced at $469,000 —- but she’s throwing in $3,000 for closing costs.

If she can’t sell the house in time for the coming school year, she’s already made plans to put her daughter in private school.

Wonder why enrollment is declining in public schools?

Suddenly, it doesn’t look like such a mystery anymore.

Edited by OnlyMe

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A necessarary side effect or the HPC to be. Unlucky, you wont eb the last.

The above quote sums up the tunnel vision a lot of the "HPC Lunatics" on here have!!!

"A necessary side effect", the man's just lost his job for Christ's sake!!!!!!!

"Can't make an omellete without breaking a few eggs", just as long as it's not yours eh Chuz???!!!!

Kevino...............

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A family member used to be a lithographer by trade, he moved on to bigger and brighter things, he recognised that these sort of jobs will be the victim of the second stage of deindustrialisation.

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Sorry to hear your news!

There are so few industries not displaced by out-sourcing or even recruitment attempts to get overseas people in to plug the gap - and then that back-fires, nurses and GPs are the ones that spring to mind with the lay-offs there at the moment - particularly with overseas nationals having been recruited and then Tony an his gang deciding that there are no jobs and refuse to take them on after studying here, despite promises.

Not sure that even some types of lawyers don't face out-sourcing of certain functions too

Retraining, wonder what age group you are.

I've retrained at least 4 times in my life so far.

Last time, I did the retraining stuff at great personal cost in 1997 because of the spin of not enough IT people in the UK - they were recruiting Chinese at that point because they said not enough qualified people in the UK.

I'd just got back from Asia and was working in IT - so decided to get the quals - only to discover that a few years later - everything was being outsourced from whence I'd just arrived!

Like everything in this country - don't believe the hype - if you retrain - do the research - pretty much everything is capable of being out-sourced these days if the govt so deem it to be and allow the big companies to do it.

When I arrived back in 1997 - call centres were the hot thing for the UK - the toute was, save money structure your company around call-centres and IT centres in the UK - out-source, within a short period of time - out-sourced was out-sourced to India, China, Malaysia and goodness knows where.

Rather odd, that I think property has done the same thing. You got few BTLs when I was in my mid-20s and 30s (80s and early 90s), rich with money to spend, yes but not those who do it now adays on little collateral.

Sometimes I think owning a home has been out-sourced too under labour.

Maggie was all about owning your home ... this lot well ... think the mess we're in says it all.

Believe me, I was never a fan of Maggie, that was the first time I had to retrain as all of the Arts organisations I was managing went to the wall when she decided overnight (not unlike Blair) to stop the funding. At that time anyone deemed a music teacher, or involved with music was supurflous to needs and axed.

Yes, I did retrain in IT - got the quals - eventually after 3 redundancies - have got some experience - and am earning £24k. Somewhat bizzare for someone with a good Music degree, years of teaching, loads of other music mangement experience, then other world experience including TEFL in Asia, Management in Asia for leading Charities, etc. I always tried to get qualifications in whatever job I did/do.

Retraining is often a good idea if it's something you want to do, and something that society needs, but with the madness of outsourcing - pretty much everything can be out-sourced - even the legal society.

I'm hoping that before I die - society revises its view - to realise that out-sourcing was a big mistake and that globalisation, far from being the panacea to all ills, has just fueled the fire. Just hoping that some bright spark in govt - whatever party, suddenly tumbles to the logic of it all - and realises it doesn't work, and in the long-term, cannot work to the benefit of any country - unless all borders are open to everyone, irrespective of race, creed or colour - and then we have numerous people moving to where the jobs are - needing resources - before the next opportunity, arises in whatever country - oh, and by the way they retrain to fit the job in that country at their own personal cost.

Lawyers might be the last to go ... but then, when everything is globalised ... may be ....

Oops isn't that a bit like now ....

Retrain ... is something everyone spouts to those who are not where they are ... but they'll be where you are before their lives are out! And in any case, you'll still have to retrain, even it means getting by on two jobs, as I do.

Wish you all the best

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:( I can't beleive it, i've been laid off again for the third time.

I worked in the printing trade and have seen orders all but vanish at the firm where I worked.

I suppose this is an effect of the economy in a downturn, the print trade is usually one of the first to suffer after retail when things get tight.

Looks like the house deposit will have to bee used to live on for a while :angry:

Could be a good time to move into another industry. Failing that try get a job with the BoE or Fed, they need people who have experience in the printing industry.

:lol:

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My father was made unemployed when his printing firm went bust (Crest, Kent). He was 58, and the pension fund turned out to be 2/3 underfunded on a wind-up basis.

He was maintaining the computer-controlled printing presses.

It seems that transport costs are so cheap that all the work is going abroad. the printing industry does not seem a safe career choice any more.

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My father was made unemployed when his printing firm went bust (Crest, Kent). He was 58, and the pension fund turned out to be 2/3 underfunded on a wind-up basis.

He was maintaining the computer-controlled printing presses.

It seems that transport costs are so cheap that all the work is going abroad. the printing industry does not seem a safe career choice any more.

Southampton: I know of one printing firm that went bust last week - the staff got nothing, not even an apology, just get lost, nothing here for you now!.

Two other printing chaps I know claim there firms are struggleing. Does not look good.

If you want some career advice, take this. I was looking at historical employment trends over decades and guess whats as safe as houses. Drive a lorry - get a class 1 or 2 licence, about a grand. Through booms and bust employment in truck driving stays about the same. They appear not to have recessions. It can't be outsourced and migrants can't come here and do it. They are used to the other side of the road, don't know the geography and haven't got a licence. Thats what I do now. My HND in 'Electronics in Communications' is in the cupboard somewhere - what a bloody waste!.

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Sorry to hear the news- if you're good with numbers, it might be worth looking at accountancy.

On the printing side of things, I'm pretty sure there's a good future for eco-friendly printers like Severn Print and Beacon Press.

One of my clients recently bought all its brochures from a company in CHINA - took a while to ship in but the cost was minimal.

Welcome to Globalisation my friends - anarchy unleashed!

I keep bumping in to people who have been made redundant - last week alone - a manager with a utilities company, a banker, a development manager with a trade association, a web developer and a technician in a local manufacturing company. Things are obviously going pear-shaped in this part of the world. :ph34r:

I run my business and things haven't started to go quiet yet.....

On the immigration side of things, most local hospitality businesses in this area appear to be employing Poles - and this is a very poor area with very high levels of economic inactivity. Even noticed a Polish vet arriving on the scene.

It seems odd that the hospitality workers should be coming to such a poor area where they have very few prospects of good career development. In Llanybydder there is even a Polish pub which locals now avoid because of the amount of aggro between Polish workers - fights, etc.

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On the immigration side of things, most local hospitality businesses in this area appear to be employing Poles - and this is a very poor area with very high levels of economic inactivity. Even noticed a Polish vet arriving on the scene.

It seems odd that the hospitality workers should be coming to such a poor area where they have very few prospects of good career development. In Llanybydder there is even a Polish pub which locals now avoid because of the amount of aggro between Polish workers - fights, etc.

It's the same here in Blackpool, most of the low paid jobs are now being filled with eastern European immigrants, and say have a casino will bring economic regeneration, nahhhhh they will just employ more Poles and Russians.

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Sorry to hear your news.

Have you considered training to be a bailiff?

:lol: nice one, that could be a popular job over the next couple of years.

On the subject of polish workers, my dad works on the buses and was telling me the other day that about 80% of new drivers employed at his depot are polish. The bus company take them on in droves as they can't get any english people to do the job.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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