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Shortage Of New Inspectors 'will Derail Homeseller Pack Scheme'

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Shortage of new inspectors 'will derail homeseller pack scheme'

By Valerie Elliott, Consumer Editor

(Taken from: The Times - May 20, 2006)

A SHORTAGE of inspectors to prepare the new house-sellers’ packs will drastically slow the process of moving and upset the Government’s plans to revolutionise the property market, industry experts predict.

Without a houseseller’s pack no residential property will be able to be sold from June next year. Training of the planned 7,000-strong inspectorate started last year but so far, The Times has established, only 196 people have been approved for the task.

Housing industry experts now say there could be a year of panic selling to avoid the extra costs that will be incurred with the pack. They say that this is then likely to be followed by a stagnant market, because there will be a waiting list for the packs to be prepared by an inspector.

A pack for a two-bedroom flat in London is estimated to cost £600 to £800, plus VAT, while owners of larger houses will have to pay more. Only Asda’s new property service has promised to compile free packs for housesellers. The aim of the pack is to make selling easier, but most vendors will end up paying more because the Council of Mortgage Lenders has made clear that its members still expect full structural surveys on new homes and, in most cases, will not rely on a seller’s pack.

Urgent representations are being made to Ruth Kelly, the Communities Secretary, and Yvette Cooper, the Housing Minister. Kevin Martin, the President of the Law Society, backs the plans for a seller’s pack but said yesterday: “We are worried that there won’t be enough home inspectors accredited in time. It is a rigorous regime and we know that a lot of people are failing the qualification. We also want to know who is to regulate these home inspectors. Who will be the provider of personal indemnity insurance if it all goes wrong?”

A further blow to the scheme is a high dropout rate in the number of people training for the job from other professions. John Brownlow, a property company director, said: “I’ve tried to recruit home inspectors and the calibre of some of the people is laughable. They think they know everything about property by watching Location, Location, Location. My fear is there will be a lot of half-baked surveys and clients will not be able to rely on home condition reports.”

The Conservative Party has already pledged to scrap the packs scheme. Michael Gove, the Tories’ housing spokesman, has tabled questions to ministers about problems with the packs. He said: “The revelation that government plans are in an even more chaotic state than we feared only emphasises the need for ministers to review the whole scheme.”

The Department for Communities and Local Government insisted last night that the policy was “on track”. It confirmed that only 196 people had been approved as home inspectors but said that about 4,000 were being trained: “We are confident there is sufficient time in a year to get the number of qualified people up.”

Packs will contain a home condition report by a home inspector, may require receipts for building work and repairs carried out on the house, and will include details of title deeds, planning and land searches, and an energy efficiency report on the property.

"They think they know everything about property by watching Location, Location, Location." :D:P:blink:

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Training of the planned 7,000-strong inspectorate started last year but so far, The Times has established, only 196 people have been approved for the task.

No too bright at The Times, are they! Why would anyone want 7000 trained inspectors waiting around for 12 whole months without any work? If 4000 are now being trained, it doesn't take a genius to work out that their target will easily be hit by the time the whole thing starts.

Who dislikes this HIP scheme? Estate agents and Tories! That says it all!

p

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1. The public dont like the scheme, The Council of Mortgage lenders will not accept it so it will only be relevent to those paying cash (That is Tess Jowel and the likes). And Buyers dont trust the packs either. The RICS dont like them either. So to summarise, only the Government who hope to create a new economy in fleecing the public like them.

2. They have today 196 trained inspectors, that will be 195 too many as there will not be any house sales when the New Labour miracle economy collapses next year.

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I am still puzzled by how the system will cope with delay. How long will the sellers pack be valid for? How much will it cost to keep it up to date? At what point is the sellers pack deemed to have done its job? Does the house seller have to have the pack updated after the offer has been made?

This will also be interesting for the BTL market. Currently, it is common practice for BTLs to speculatively advertise their properties as for sale or rent between lets. In future it will cost £500 - £1000 for this priviledge.

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1. The public dont like the scheme... And Buyers dont trust the packs either. The RICS dont like them either.

1. You're surprised that RICS don't like them??

2. Important as you are, you don't speak for the 'public' and neither do you speak for 'buyers'. Stop putting forward personal opinions as fact - it makes you look sillier.

p

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The sellers pack will impact on the fluidity of an already constipated market, it will increase further the ridiculous amount of time it takes to sell a property.

Many people will not be ars3d with the hassle, and just stay put, This will put even more pressure on the availablilty of housing and prices will rise even further.

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1. The public dont like the scheme, The Council of Mortgage lenders will not accept it so it will only be relevent to those paying cash (That is Tess Jowel and the likes). And Buyers dont trust the packs either. The RICS dont like them either. So to summarise, only the Government who hope to create a new economy in fleecing the public like them.

2. They have today 196 trained inspectors, that will be 195 too many as there will not be any house sales when the New Labour miracle economy collapses next year.

Errrrrrrrrrrrrr How the hell do you know that?

Estate agents don't like it, the public (well most of the one's I know) like the idea, it's only fair, you are selling a house the buyer should be able to see what they are buying, you get more protection buying a TV set than a house in this country.

As for the CLC, they are coming around to it as the date approches, they have no choice in the matter

I think you should read a little more about it before slagging it off, not everything NUlb do is bad, most of it is but this is a damm good idea, the problem has been the implimentation, but that is now sorted out, there will be more than enough people to do it come next June

Edited by Robbrent

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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