Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Chrysalis

Leaving Property

Recommended Posts

Another question from me :)

I understand my landlord will want people to view my home before I leave so he has little or no gap in rent, I respect this and said he can have 4 working days before the saturday I move.

Is this reasonable, can a tenant refuse this fully, do landlords usually want more time?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have no obligation to allow any access to the property whatsoever. However, it would be reasonable, in my opinion, to allow access to any viewings. Perhaps only when you are present. Limiting it to the 4 days before you move makes it slightly difficult for the landlord, as even if he finds a tenant on the first day of those 4 days, the tenancy agreement etc is unlikely to be all sorted out within the four days, therefore he will probably have a void period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another question from me :)

I understand my landlord will want people to view my home before I leave so he has little or no gap in rent, I respect this and said he can have 4 working days before the saturday I move.

Is this reasonable, can a tenant refuse this fully, do landlords usually want more time?

Thanks

I'm glad you're not my tenant you scumbag.

My own tenancy agreements state that I have the right to conduct viewings in the last month of the tenancy. In 9 years only 1 tenant has tried to stop this & they quickly changed their mind when I pointed out the condition in the tenancy agreement.

If you want ongoing rights, you should pay ongoing rent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad you're not my tenant you scumbag.

My own tenancy agreements state that I have the right to conduct viewings in the last month of the tenancy. In 9 years only 1 tenant has tried to stop this & they quickly changed their mind when I pointed out the condition in the tenancy agreement.

If you want ongoing rights, you should pay ongoing rent.

It does not matter what you write into the tenancy agreement it would not be enforceable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No deposits are for damage to the property. To paraphrase yourself..."I'm glad you're not my landlord you scumbag" You are breaching the tenants legal rights by deducting from the deposit in this way, or by enforcing access.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No deposits are for damage to the property. To paraphrase yourself..."I'm glad you're not my landlord you scumbag" You are breaching the tenants legal rights by deducting from the deposit in this way, or by enforcing access.

Breaching the tenants rights by enforcing the contract!

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Go back to your shed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not an enforceable contract! It's obvious you have not yet been taken to court over this....I will just point out that it is potentially a criminal offence to do what you are doing. There is no more "debate" to have over this matter....what you are doing is illegal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad you're not my tenant you scumbag.

My own tenancy agreements state that I have the right to conduct viewings in the last month of the tenancy. In 9 years only 1 tenant has tried to stop this & they quickly changed their mind when I pointed out the condition in the tenancy agreement.

If you want ongoing rights, you should pay ongoing rent.

I am my rent is paid for this month, which does give me the right of privacy.

I am also glad you not my landlord.

My sister for example walked out the bathroom to see someone at the top of the stairs walking around, but sorry things like that which put me off in the first place.

If I seen your tenancy agreement I would either refuse it or expect a discount during the last month in exchange for the lost privacy.

I am allowing my landlord to do it since I want to keep good relations and of course am staying with him after I move, thats the way I see it.

MrShed did make a good point tho and I will probably ring him monday and give him the full week.

Edited by Chrysalis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not an enforceable contract! It's obvious you have not yet been taken to court over this....I will just point out that it is potentially a criminal offence to do what you are doing. There is no more "debate" to have over this matter....what you are doing is illegal.

:lol::lol:

Under your previous post, deposits cover damages and not even unpaid rent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Idiot.

Per my own solicitor prepared tenancy agreement, the deposit is held to cover any reasonable costs incurred or losses caused to the landlords by ANY breaches of the obligations in this agreement by the Tenant.

Now go play somewhere else behind a shed somewhere finding children to mess with.

I am my rent is paid for this month, which does give me the right of privacy.

I am also glad you not my landlord.

My sister for example walked out the bathroom to see someone at the top of the stairs walking around, but sorry things like that which put me off in the first place.

If I seen your tenancy agreement I would either refuse it or expect a discount during the last month in exchange for the lost privacy.

I am allowing my landlord to do it since I want to keep good relations and of course am staying with him after I move, thats the way I see it.

MrShed did make a good point tho and I will probably ring him monday and give him the full week.

Any reasonable person would give a warning when they're going to enter the property and would do viewings at reasonable hours.

Your attempt to keep people out means you have no understanding of the cost to your LL the fact that you probably looked at the place when the last tenants were still in occupation yourself has no bearing on your selfish attitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it depends on your contract. But in fact, most ASTs do not allow you to use the deposit for unpaid rent. However, this is beside the point. The "obligation" you are talking about, the term regarding viewing access to the property, is an unfair term according to the office of fair trading. The reason for this is that it breaches the tenants basic legal rights to "quiet enjoyment" of the property. Therefore the term is null and void, and cannot be enforced, nor can any financial loss for breach of this term be claimed. I suggest you find yourself a new solicitor.

Edited by MrShed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't expect you to follow my advice....you have already shown that you have no regard for the law, and so would not expect you to follow my legally factual advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol::lol:

Under your previous post, deposits cover damages and not even unpaid rent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Idiot.

Per my own solicitor prepared tenancy agreement, the deposit is held to cover any reasonable costs incurred or losses caused to the landlords by ANY breaches of the obligations in this agreement by the Tenant.

Now go play somewhere else behind a shed somewhere finding children to mess with.

Any reasonable person would give a warning when they're going to enter the property and would do viewings at reasonable hours.

Your attempt to keep people out means you have no understanding of the cost to your LL the fact that you probably looked at the place when the last tenants were still in occupation yourself has no bearing on your selfish attitude.

Place was empty when I looked, likewaise so is my new place.

I have also paid him a holding fee to cover the period that it is empty while I am still here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On principle, do not let strangers view your home because there is a good chance that they are scouting out the place to burglar it. This is even more important if you're a single female!

TTRTR -- dont' be silly. Your clause is not enforcable, the moment you'd get impolite, you would find that none of your appointments are kept (and of course, on principle, the lock is changed). You can take this to court if you want, but you would have a hard time proving that your tenant hasn't been very unlucky with traffic, late working and other unforeseen events that prevented your viewings from taking place.

Btw, you're a bit abraisive in your mailings -- is the smalltime property magnate stress getting to you? :)

Relax, it will all be over in 100 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Place was empty when I looked, likewaise so is my new place.

I have also paid him a holding fee to cover the period that it is empty while I am still here.

A holding fee is a deposit. Rent is rent. Which one have you paid?

On principle, do not let strangers view your home because there is a good chance that they are scouting out the place to burglar it. This is even more important if you're a single female!

TTRTR -- dont' be silly. Your clause is not enforcable, the moment you'd get impolite, you would find that none of your appointments are kept (and of course, on principle, the lock is changed). You can take this to court if you want, but you would have a hard time proving that your tenant hasn't been very unlucky with traffic, late working and other unforeseen events that prevented your viewings from taking place.

Btw, you're a bit abraisive in your mailings -- is the smalltime property magnate stress getting to you? :)

Relax, it will all be over in 100 years.

Naturally I wait until the last months rent has been paid before I enforce the ability to conduct viewings as stiplulated and AGREED to in the tenancy agreement. No use trying to enfore something with the tenant being able to try the no last months rent thing on as well.

What's wrong with tenants, don't you people honour what you agree with?

It's all about you isn't it, you have no regard for anything but your few pounds deposit and your picky little arguments. Just be nice, allow the viewings and you'll leave on good terms with a good reference. It's not that hard is it!

No wonder you don't want to be LL's yourselves either, imagine dealing with people like you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naturally I wait until the last months rent has been paid before I enforce the ability to conduct viewings as stiplulated and AGREED to in the tenancy agreement. No use trying to enfore something with the tenant being able to try the no last months rent thing on as well.

I think the moral of this thread is that if you have an Australian LL, resident in Sweden, never pay the last month's rent as he has a shaky grasp of what deposits are for.

Having said that - I never felt legally obliged to let the LL show people round, and wouldn't have let them do it while I was out. But on the few occasions LLs asked if I minded I was quite happy to arrange a time to let them show a prospective tenant round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the moral of this thread is that if you have an Australian LL, resident in Sweden, never pay the last month's rent as he has a shaky grasp of what deposits are for.

:lol::lol::lol:

Having said that - I never felt legally obliged to let the LL show people round, and wouldn't have let them do it while I was out. But on the few occasions LLs asked if I minded I was quite happy to arrange a time to let them show a prospective tenant round.

There you go, reasonable behaviour. Wasn't so hard. But I expect from our prev conversations Magpie that you are a very reasonable person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol::lol::lol:

There you go, reasonable behaviour. Wasn't so hard. But I expect from our prev conversations Magpie that you are a very reasonable person.

Not very reasonable when it comes to last month's rent as I got messed around a few too many times. Though in the later stages of renting I did still pay the last month when the landlord seemed reasonable. Just not when I had reason to think they were dodgy as I couldn't be bothered going through all that small claims hassle again...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not very reasonable when it comes to last month's rent as I got messed around a few too many times. Though in the later stages of renting I did still pay the last month when the landlord seemed reasonable. Just not when I had reason to think they were dodgy as I couldn't be bothered going through all that small claims hassle again...

Couldn't agree more. Over the period of the tenancy you would generally get to know your LL & know what to expect at the end.

Another reason I haven't had any troubles I guess, because despite my furious posting on this part of the forum, I am a very nice person and my tenants know that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Couldn't agree more. Over the period of the tenancy you would generally get to know your LL & know what to expect at the end.

Another reason I haven't had any troubles I guess, because despite my furious posting on this part of the forum, I am a very nice person and my tenants know that.

I just suggested that on one of the other threads. If you don't have too many problems with your tenants it's probably because you're a nicer person than you sometimes like to pretend to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just suggested that on one of the other threads. If you don't have too many problems with your tenants it's probably because you're a nicer person than you sometimes like to pretend to be.

Yes my forum personality is very different to my real one. Must be the ability to hide behind the screen.

A few forumites met me at a pub a couple of months ago and one commented that he expected me to be an overt bull hell-bent on pushing the virtues of property instead of the mild mannered person I really am!

:rolleyes:

We had a great evening BTW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes my forum personality is very different to my real one. Must be the ability to hide behind the screen.

It's probably that. Plus I think the levels of pomposity and idiocy that are manifested here would bring out the troll in a saint some days...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naturally I wait until the last months rent has been paid before I enforce the ability to conduct viewings as stiplulated and AGREED to in the tenancy agreement. No use trying to enfore something with the tenant being able to try the no last months rent thing on as well.

Ok, how will you enforce the unenforcable? Turn up with a PC in tow? Walk around the property whilst your tenant lets you know in no uncertain terms in front of your new prospective tenant what they think about your 'enforcement' or service record as a landlord?

Think about the actual physical steps. Including you having to prove to the judge that the tenant deliberatly let you down, and to show what actual loss you had from a prospective viewing that did not take place. Or indeed, to show to the judge that you didn't pester your tenant and thus were persona non grata in their home.

Just because something is in the contract, it doesn't mean that it is useful to you in practice, a contract is a legal paper, not a wishlist to Santa Claus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.