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Bingley Bloke

National Insurance – What Is It For?

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Can someone please explain to me why I pay National Insurance? Looking in my wage slip this month I noticed that my NI contribution was £109. My take-home pay is only £1,104. What on earth am I paying for every month that costs nearly 10% of my take-home pay?

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Can someone please explain to me why I pay National Insurance? Looking in my wage slip this month I noticed that my NI contribution was £109. My take-home pay is only £1,104. What on earth am I paying for every month that costs nearly 10% of my take-home pay?

NI is merely income tax renamed for political purposes.

It allows GB to claim that the income tax rates are 22% and 40%.

The actual rates of direct taxation (Income tax + NI) are 40.6% and 47.7%.

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You think you feel bad, ask your employer how much he paid in your NI as well, 11% of your salary!!.

And what is it spent on, well someone has to pay for people who have contributed nothing to the system but are afforded by the Law to help themselves upon arrival.

Also, take a look at all the Mercs and BMW's in the staff carpark in your local hospitals, and remember Nurses and Doctors ride bikes, Bean Counters drive cars.

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You think you feel bad, ask your employer how much he paid in your NI as well, 11% of your salary!!.

Something most people forget. Brown claims income tax is 22%, but he actually takes over 40% of your income directly, even before you pay consumption taxes, council tax and stealth taxes.

But hey, ain't it lucky we live in such a low-tax country?

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You think you feel bad, ask your employer how much he paid in your NI as well, 11% of your salary!!.

And what is it spent on, well someone has to pay for people who have contributed nothing to the system but are afforded by the Law to help themselves upon arrival.

Also, take a look at all the Mercs and BMW's in the staff carpark in your local hospitals, and remember Nurses and Doctors ride bikes, Bean Counters drive cars.

Employer NI is actually one of my bugbears, the figures of 40.6 and 47.7 percent include this.

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But you can always save for your own pension that is if you can afford to even stand still with all these taxes we have.

Government has put itself in change and will continue to increasingly rip us all off using a corrupt legal system and the police until people get up and realise that they need to take control of their own lives else the future will be very poor indeed.

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ers NI is 12.2%

You can't just add the EE NI figure though, because of the way it is levied.

For the following example, the NI limit is assumed to be the same as the higher rate threshold.

Lower rate:

Income Tax: 22%

Employee NI: 11%

Employer NI: 12.8%

Higher rate:

Income tax: 40%

Employee NI: 1%

Employer NI: 12.8%

1000 net pay at the lower rate will cost an employer £1684 (40.6%).

1000 net pay at the higher rate will cost an employer £1912 (47.7%).

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Current competitors are China, India, South Africa.

How on earth is business supposed to compete without offshoring ?.

Well thats exactly the point, Gordon wants your jobs offshore, Social Equity, Repayment for a nasty imperialistic nation 100 years ago.

Wake up and smell the coffee, their task is to screw the UK, and why not nobody in the cabinet is British, they are Scotish.

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Hey don’t worry about how much tax you pay, at least the lefty’s are spending it wisely ! :P

Source http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30000-13524729,00.html

Compensation payments to prisoners have almost doubled in the last year - reaching more than £4m.

Nearly £3.5m was paid out for 'miscellaneous injuries' - including a reported pay out to one inmates of £2.7m.

More than £113,000 was also paid to prisoners who alleged they had been assaulted by staff.

Home Office minister Gerry Sutcliffe revealed the figures on Thursday in answer to a Parliamentary question.

They showed £4,017,233 in compensation was paid by publicly-run prisons in out-of-court settlements to inmates in 2005-06.

This was almost twice the 2004-05 figure of £2,160,530.

A Prison Service spokesman said figures from year-to-year varied "considerably" because of the changing nature of claims.

But shadow prison minister Edward Garnier warned jails not to fall victim to a rise in the "compensation culture".

He said: "Compensation should be for genuine claims, not spurious ones."

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Nurses and Doctors ride bikes

Hmmm, a nurse's starting salary is more than I'm on after ten years in full time employment, so while I can see what you're getting at, I don't consider them that poorly off, at least not compared to me.

What I would really like to know is what my NI is actually paying for. Is there a way I can make use of it? For example... Does it pay my wages if I'm off sick? I've only had fours days off sick in my entire working life, so perhaps I should start having more and get my money's worth! How many would I have to have to be getting what I'm paying for?

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Can someone please explain to me why I pay National Insurance? Looking in my wage slip this month I noticed that my NI contribution was £109. My take-home pay is only £1,104. What on earth am I paying for every month that costs nearly 10% of my take-home pay?

It helps those with small investments (say under half a million) as they pay very little tax :D

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  • 335 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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