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Landagan

What Are The Best Tricks In Negotiating A Lower Rent?

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Renting is the only option for most now.

But instead of talking up it's virtues as is the tendancy here, we should see it for what it is.

Servicing the debt of the greedy btl'ers that have forced us to look for rented accomodation in the first place!

I for one intend to do my bit and pay as little rent as I need to. Downward pressure on rents should be our priority if we are going to exert any kind of influence on this market.

I am about to rent and would appreciate any tips on getting a good deal, in a good area.

Let's talk it down!

Can anyone help?

.

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Renting is the only option for most now.

But instead of talking up it's virtues as is the tendancy here, we should see it for what it is.

Servicing the debt of the greedy btl'ers that have forced us to look for rented accomodation in the first place!

I for one intend to do my bit and pay as little rent as I need to. Downward pressure on rents should be our priority if we are going to exert any kind of influence on this market.

I am about to rent and would appreciate any tips on getting a good deal, in a good area.

Let's talk it down!

Can anyone help?

.

I would suggest finding several different properties and playing the landlords off against each other. This would only work if they are desperate for tenants otherwise they may tell you to stick your offer in a "desirable and sought-after location".

Billy Shears

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My thinking on this is that generally rents are determined by the market, and not by the landlord as many of them would like to think.

So the starting point is to find where the market is at the moment for your area.

Look at quite a few places, maybe 10 or 15, and you will begin to see what constitutes good value.

I recently rented a new place.

Conversation with the lettings agent would be something like this:

Property on the market at 1600pcm. Open slightly low to give yourself space to negotiate.

Me: we've seen the property we quite, like it, we'd like to offer 1350pcm.

EA: Well it was on the market for 1800, and they've already dropped their price so thats a bit low.

Me: Well we've seen a better quality property nearby that is offered at 1400. Similar size, Off street parking etc. The offer stands.

EA. Contacts vendor with offer, vendor usually comes back and says 1500 or no deal.

Me: No, that's a bit too much.

Explain to them that the market is lower than the rent they're asking.(This is almost always true, obviously they're opening high) Be honest about this, you will help them to bring their prices down.

At this stage I may make a slight counter offer, let them have a small psychological victory, it will really help. You won't get a deal if they feel like they're getting shafted.

If they turn around to you and tell you to get stuffed, then make sure that there really are better or cheaper similar properties that you'd be happy to live in.You can just politely tell them their price is too high and walk away. The property will still be available a month later, and if it isn't them some fool is paying too much.

I stick with honesty, people will pick this up from you, they deal in the market all the time, and they'll know if you're not being forthright.

If I really liked the place I may go up slightly, but in the current market you can play very hard.

Basically understand your market, and then use other properties as a lever to negotiate rents down.

Obviously there are other ways of negotiating, but that's the way I do it.

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vandalise the exterior of the property one night. spray ect.

then get them to come clean it up and fix the damage. then say to them in passing.

"im thinking of moving at the end of the tenancy as the areas getting quite prolific for robbery."

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As a landlord, I couldn't agree more.

We reduced our property by £20 a month because that was what the agent said the renter had offered.

However, I was going to carry out a bit of work to the property, (generally tidying it up), as this would have cost me £500, I said to our agent, I'll accept the reduced offer, but he will not get X Y Z done to the property.

The agent came back and said the renter had accepted, everyone's a winner!

as a landlord. 'i come to a site called house price crash and post'.

that tells me something.

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The key isnot to be too fussy.

take they places most others wouldnt dream of.

i pay 150 pounds a month rent, for a flat that shakes and rattles from 7am till 5pm daily, also theres a small manufacturers below so people coming in and out.

i also know the landlord had trouble renting this place at all due to the noise and privacy issue.

but hey im a single man and it kinda suits me.

also the place looked shit as well when i moved in, so i laminasted the floor , got fitted blinds, decorated ect.cost me about 400 pounds total.before that had a dirty old carpet on the floor and filthy nets at the window and oil up the walls.

now its quite nice and the noise dont bother me.

not only that the landlord will be very reluctant to try raising rent ect, giving the problems he had renting it at all.

Another way is to do some work in return, lots of people out there would actually prefer a bit of help for the rent, like farmers or self employed people ect.many will negotiate a bit of work to cover the remt.if you go this route though set out clearly how much they expect for it.any extra they need to pay you for.

Another is offering to renovate a house for someone, lots of people have a house and no money, so do a deal for so long free rent for doing jobs, i did this before on a house in inverness.I took 1 month of hard graft, painting and fixing the roof and broken windows and tidying the garden and fitting some kitchen worktops ect.they supplied the materials and i got 2 years free rent outta it.

Edited by homeless

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like with anything, it depends on how much you want it

i offered £700 vs an asking price of £800 - they refused to drop below £750 even though it would have made economic sense to take my offer - however, they were adamant that's what it was worth so good luck to them

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hire 4 hookers to stand outside your house. call the landlord to come to fix a leaky pipe.

once he arrives, get the brass'es to say to the landlord when he passes them. "looking for business love...allo cutie....do you want some love.."

when he gets in say, sorry about all the prostitutes. the areas become a red light area.

can i have a discount ?

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hire 4 hookers to stand outside your house. call the landlord to come to fix a leaky pipe.

once he arrives, get the brass'es to say to the landlord when he passes them. "looking for business love...allo cutie....do you want some love.."

when he gets in say, sorry about all the prostitutes. the areas become a red light area.

can i have a discount ?

Are they male prostitutes? Could make the place rent at a premium.

Serious answer: offer three month's rent up front. Normally gets a ~10% discount.

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Renting is the only option for most now. But instead of talking up it's virtues as is the tendancy here, we should see it for what it is. Servicing the debt of the greedy btl'ers that have forced us to look for rented accomodation in the first place! I for one intend to do my bit and pay as little rent as I need to. Downward pressure on rents should be our priority if we are going to exert any kind of influence on this market. I am about to rent and would appreciate any tips on getting a good deal, in a good area.

Let's talk it down! Can anyone help?

The answer is not to negotiate a lower rent but move every two years! I am renting a bigger place today than I had a year ago. The rent is also 20% lower than it was in 2002. I am debating whether to move again next year because rents seem to be drifting downwards again.

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My tactic is to offer 6 months' rent in advance. Of cause you have to make sure you HAVE 6 months of rent and you have to take into account the lost interest from a high interest savings account, and I've never tried this through an agent, only directly with a landlord, but it usually works pretty well.

It reduces the risk for the landlord because they get a whole 6 months rent, and I usually knock about 15% of the asking rent off.

Say something like "I'll write you a cheque for £X k on signing the contract" and watch the pound signs in their eyes! ;)

Edited by Bear Goggles

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The answer is simple.

Be a model tenant.

Our longest lasting tenant has only seen one £10 rent rise in the 8 years we have owned the place (we 'inherited') him when we bought the flat. Always pays on time, never grumbles. The longer he stays there the better value his rent becomes.

As somebody further up the thread said - "eveyone's a winner".

OTOH if you really want to pay the hard nosed game, then the place to go is your nearest city centre 'luxury apartment' development(s).

HTH.

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Quite simply watch the houses available for rent and note how long they have been up for and then ask the question.

We offered £825 in Feb this year to this house http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-106...a_n=2&tr_t=rent and they refused, so their house has been stood empty since mid Feb.

And £900 to this one and again they refused, http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-569...a_n=2&tr_t=rent - they are commuting to B'ham, about 200 miles every week - bet they wish they'd snapped our hands off now.

Anyone who's watching would get away with offering £750 now me thinks !

Edited by terrified

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How about this strategy. Get lots of property developers to build huge numbers of new build flats in your area. Then get your local university to build big new halls of residence. Then get your local cab drivers and supermarket workers to take on huge mortgages to buy houses to let. Then when there are three houses on the market for every young professional in your area, point to the fifty pages of houses to rent in the property supplement and ask for a discount.

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Thanks for all the great advice everyone!

I think I will definitely keep a closer eye on the market over the next few months, see if I can see anything ripe for the picking. And I like the idea of 3 a months rent advance, to help negotiate a 10% off.

I definitely will be trying some of these tricks.

Maybe spot a place a little run down, and use that to my advantage, although I will not result to vandalism B)

It seems it is well worth the effort bargaining right now. Especially in the absense of Ice Cream Vans :)

.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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