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Times - Jobs Meltdown Warnings As Britain

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So much for Browns miracle economy he has done nothing to protect British jobs, in fact he has thrown open the doors of the UK job market in order to keep wages down, now workers in the UK will start paying the price for his incompetance.

Meltdown warnings as Britain loses 7,300 jobs in 24 hours

The Government was today urged to take action to rescue British industry after three companies today announced closures and outsourcing leading to the loss of 7,300 jobs.

A series of grim announcements stunned workers and led to warnings of a jobs meltdown, especially in manufacturing. The largest cut was at communications giant NTL which unveiled plans to cut its workforce by 6,000 following a £3.4 billion merger with cable peer Telewest.

Home shopping firm Littlewoods Shop Direct announced that it was closing three warehouses with the loss of 1,200 jobs. And food giant Heinz said production of HP sauce would be moved from Birmingham to abroad, meaning a loss of 125 jobs.

Union leaders have called for government intervention to stem the tide of jobs from Britain to developing countries...............

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So much for Browns miracle economy he has done nothing to protect British jobs, in fact he has thrown open the doors of the UK job market in order to keep wages down, now workers in the UK will start paying the price for his incompetance.

Meltdown warnings as Britain loses 7,300 jobs in 24 hours

There are also layoffs in progress which were announced some time ago. Colgate for example are closing their manufacturing base in the UK.

Colgate layoffs

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The transport chap is going to boost the number of jobs available - each and every car will be fitted with a blackbox to be monitored for *ahem* congestion reasons.

Its partly the fault of one of the apprentice finalists - she's an offshoring expert.

There must have been news of job losses every day - but no news channel is keeping a running total yet?

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Heinz, which brought the HP business from Danone last year, said the plant in Aston operated three days a week and spare capacity was available at its site in Holland.

So spare capacity in England and Holland, to them it is a no-brainer which plant to close.

The government are making even more red-tape, just in case any remaining companies are unclear which is the best option :angry:

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...and these job losses are only being reported becase they are from bigger firms and involve larger numbers.

What about the knock on effect in these areas? Less money being spent, small businesses suffering because of this?

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So spare capacity in England and Holland, to them it is a no-brainer which plant to close.

The government are making even more red-tape, just in case any remaining companies are unclear which is the best option :angry:

I'm sure I remember a bunch of layoffs in Liverpool under similar circumstances a few years ago where the reason cited was that it was easier to sack people in the UK than elsewhere. Maybe the lack of red tape is just as problematic in some cases.

Edited by greencat

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Tip of the iceberg.

Big companies make these decisions over months/years. Maybe for companies it has become increasingly obvious that the expected turnaround in the overall cost base is not coming soon enough or not at all.

Maybe the point of no return has been finally reached, maybe this is it, once you start these trends competitor companies feel obliged to follow suit (safety in numbers too, you don't stand out amongst your peers).

This situation has been many yearsd in the making and is as much about high costs in the UK (together with all the associated factors of sourcing staff, premises, land) as much as it is about very low costs in competitor countries.

We have been sold/indebted/inflated down the river by govt and the bankers.

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...and these job losses are only being reported becase they are from bigger firms and involve larger numbers.

What about the knock on effect in these areas? Less money being spent, small businesses suffering because of this?

When manufacturing companies close, the problem is particularly bad. This is because they use an army of external services and component companies for support. I recall someone saying that the true job loss toll from the Rover closure (sorry no link) would be about 4X the headline figure.

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Interesting to see how patterns repeat themselves over and over again. The UK mirror HPI market, California, crashed with us in 1989. CA, the world's 8th largest economy, had rampant HPI in the mid to late 80's. Then companies began closing down and moving out of state due to the high cost of living in CA. As the jobs left the house prices had nothing to sustain them and down they went. Its all happening again only this time CA is about 6 months ahead of the UK.

De ja Vu.

Edited by Realistbear

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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