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Sellers 'strip Homes When Moving'

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4961788.stm

House sellers regularly strip their old properties of anything of value when they move home, according to a survey.
Light bulb fittings, toilet roll holders and wheelie bins can often end up in removal vans, a report by Halifax Estate Agency suggests.

:lol:

Halifax PR machine is very very good - every weekend they pump out some sort of nonsense which gets picked up and run with by most of the media......it's like the financial version of Jordan flashing her norks outside a nightclub.........in fact next weekend's halifax press release will be "8 out of 10 homeowners would like to buy a house big enough for Jordans massive jugs!!!"

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4961788.stm

House sellers regularly strip their old properties of anything of value when they move home, according to a survey.
Light bulb fittings, toilet roll holders and wheelie bins can often end up in removal vans, a report by Halifax Estate Agency suggests.

:lol:

One of the houses my parents bought was owned by a couple of police officers, probably earning reasonable money. They took everything including the rubber door stops and mirror tiles from the bathroom (which in turn left an awful mess). Tight b*st*rds!

The owner of the last house we bought removed the shed, panel by panel, even though we offered £150 for it!! They also removed the pond pump too as they wanted £50 for that and it wasn't even new!!

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From the article:

"The key is to ensure that you have documentation stating precisely what will be left behind or taken. Also know your rights when it comes to what constitutes fixtures and fittings."

Every house I bought and sold, had to have an inventory list.

Ranging from shed to curtains, carpets and light bulbs.

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House sellers regularly strip their old properties of anything of value when they move home, according to a survey.
This isn't new.
The same thing happened to my parents years ago.
They had an agreed inventory but didn't imagine that the previous owners would take out the light bulbs, light switches and anything else that wasn't named in the inventory.
Why do people do this?
:blink:

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This isn't new.

The same thing happened to my parents years ago.

They had an agreed inventory but didn't imagine that the previous owners would take out the light bulbs, light switches and anything else that wasn't named in the inventory.

Why do people do this? :blink:

must take that bog roll... might want to wipe my bum on the way out???

I think people are just tight. I think its about want and hunger. People stay psychologically hungry when they have enough. and greed is a biological response to famine and feast. I think that a lot more bog rolls are going to go missing as people feel the pinch of falling prices.

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Because, they are scum? <_<

No, a little unfair possibly. :unsure:

Perhaps they look at house moving as a business and hence will take the mick if thet can get away with it. The only way to stop this sort of thing is legally I'm afraid. Or embarass the hell out of them writing a little story to their local papaer naming and shaming them. What is that expression the legal begals use; 'It can't be slander or libel if its true'! ;)

Would the local paper publish the story if it named the sellers? Might be better to make a website, including documentary evidence and the like.

I read a similar story some years ago. Aparantly the inventory included some very nice carpets, but when the new owners arrived there was just a patch a few inches square in the corner of a room. Another house had a very nice spiral staircase as a selling feature, but when the new owners moved in, it had gone, making it impossible to get upstairs!

Billy Shears

Edited by BillyShears

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Another house had a very nice spiral staircase as a selling feature, but when the new owners moved in, it had gone, making it impossible to get upstairs!

Billy Shears

Now that is taking the p***!

I'm sorry that is so bad it's funny!

There must be some sort of law that stops people like this just removing the house brick by brick or something!

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A flat I brought looked all newly decorated and freshly painted. What a shock I got the day I moved in, they had painted around their furniture.

Nothing ceases to amaze me anymore. I didn't like the colour anyway.

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I once met a couple who'd been in a house for 20 years (they were selling up). They told me the story of buying their first house (the one they were selling).

Lovely place apparently, being bought from a family member. They completed, and walked in with new born baby in tow to discover that the guy had taken everything, from bath to sink to carpets to lights.

They'd put every penny they had into buying the house and it took them 4 years (4 years!!!) to get the place ship-shape again, slowly saving and at the end finally suing the family member vendor for breach of contract.

Unbelievable.

I'm selling now... I feel guilty for changing the locks to slightly less good ones, taking the blinds, washing machine and fridge-freezer.

When you buy, check the contract before exchange, and maybe even demand to see the property on completion date prior to authorizing your solicitor to transfer the money. Easier to sue them for breach of contract before you've handed over the money if they do try and funny business.

(PS - the Law... my understanding is that if it is on the estate agents ddetails then it should be on the contract, and if it is on the contract then it shold be at the property. CCheck the contract with a fine toothcomb and don't assume anything!)

Edited by Father Fred

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Now that is taking the p***!

I'm sorry that is so bad it's funny!

There must be some sort of law that stops people like this just removing the house brick by brick or something!

I read this article a number of years ago. However if I recall correctly, when the new buyers checked the inventory it mentioned a large number of fittings by name, but didn't mention the staircase. The buyers said that they never even thought of it being necessary to list the spiral staircase as a fitting.

Billy Shears

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I read this article a number of years ago. However if I recall correctly, when the new buyers checked the inventory it mentioned a large number of fittings by name, but didn't mention the staircase. The buyers said that they never even thought of it being necessary to list the spiral staircase as a fitting.

Billy Shears

Its not its a fixture

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Halifax PR machine is very very good - every weekend they pump out some sort of nonsense which gets picked up and run with by most of the media......it's like the financial version of Jordan flashing her norks outside a nightclub.........in fact next weekend's halifax press release will be "8 out of 10 homeowners would like to buy a house big enough for Jordans massive jugs!!!"

Yep it`s a battle between them and the Wriglesworth agency constantly, they have both performed very well this weekend. It was the Easter weekend that really saw them dominate the news, 330% increases in the last decade etc. The timing and execution of the strategy that weekend was staggering <_<

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Yep it`s a battle between them and the Wriglesworth agency constantly, they have both performed very well this weekend. It was the Easter weekend that really saw them dominate the news, 330% increases in the last decade etc. The timing and execution of the strategy that weekend was staggering <_<

Is there any chance - we - HPC could provide some counter press releases directly debunking some of their stuff or highlighting the things they gloss over... I notice that Rightmoves figures are getting far less coveragre after the people on here pulled up all the inaccurate figures and shoved them in front of some journos....it would need to be done very quickly...it would also help if we got on the advance release list :-)

Edited by WSG

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There was a solicitor on MSE that said he was handling a case for someone that was buying a several hundred year old converted barn only to find on completion that the vendor took every single floorboard out of the house.

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It's a bit like when people stay in a hotel room - they probably can't resist taking things. Normally decent folk - who want a freebie - if they can get away with it they will. The stupid thing is that you hear countless stories about things being taken - that won't be any use in another house - like carpets.

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this could be the next money making scam. Spend £5K doing up the house really nice - laminate floors, wall paper etc...

Then when the purchaser buys, they eventually step in to find all the improvements are removed and transferred to the next project!!!

You step in and its a 20 square foot hole all round - no walls, no floors, no furniture, no windows, even the earth has been removed leaving just void..... :ph34r:

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When we bought in 1996 the seller took all the light fittings and bulbs. I am not sure whether this is generally the legal position, but we were entitled to working lights, so after a stiff letter an electrician fixed bare bulbs at their expense.

I have only bought twice in the UK, and in the one case, the seller was the soul of honour, removing nothing but furniture and best light fittings (all scrupulously recorded). The above case was the other, and frankly that was the worst of it - so my experience has been of fair sellers and little hassle. And I hasten to add that we too left everything when we sold.

I accept that we were lucky though - the problem is that the seller knows that he/she will probably never do a deal with that buyer again, so has few inhibitions if unscrupulous, as also in gazumping.

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I bought a house from a pair of teachers - they left it utterly filthy, they tried to charge me for 20 year old curtains and the carpet was so unpleasant my cousin would not allow his toddler on it. It took me 3 days to clean the place to be fit to decorate.

I sold that and bought a flat from a pair of professionals - the dirtiest people I have EVER seen - even the toilet was left unflushed - the grease on the kitchen hood took 4 hours to clean, the light switch outside the bathroom had snot and some brown stains on it (you work it out) - the took the fireplace and the coal fire grates I had paid extra for, they took the shelves out of the wardrobes too - which was nice and locked all the internal doors ( each room had locks) and took the keys with them !

The current house was owned by an old couple and had been since new - it too was so dirty they took 74 pictures (seriously) off the walls in the lounge and you could see the outline of each of them in dust and dirt. They also left the sink full of dirty water.

Each time I have sold I spent two days cleaning from top to bottom and I have always left a box containing teabags, a couple of mugs, a packet of digestives and some fresh milk in the fridge - it really does help them to settle in and I have not had a complaint yet. What goes around, comes around...

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I know that EA's aren't exactly popular on this forum, but I did get some useful tips on buying from one some time ago.

Make sure that EVERYTHING is detailed IN WRITING. It's not good enough to, for example, say that the oven is included. You need to state the MAKE and MODEL of the oven and he suggested that even including the serial number wasn't going too far. Likewise any other appliances including hot water heaters and solid fuel heaters. As for carpets, lights etc he suggested photographing them and including the words "as inspected and photographed on (date)) for those items. He suggested that if possible, get the vendor to sign the photos to acknowledge that they are valid.

Over the top? Apparently not. This EA quite freely admitted that even heavy things like ovens are routinely stolen so you do need to have in writing exactly what is, and is not, included. Even taking the hot water service isn't uncommon apparently, likewise removing plants from the garden.

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One of the advantages of buying whilst renting ia the ability to redecorate / clean the newly purchased house. We're spending 3 weeks painting, carpetting, cleaning.

Our sellers took plants from garden, garden shed, shelves that could be of no conceivable use in their new property.

They were buying a property well in excess of £1 million.

They did leave us some bricks, some half empty paint pots, 4 lumps of coal, a skip load of rubbish in the garages, and a car belonging to their son. (the car was removed after a week).

We, by way of comparison, thoroughly cleaned our flat and left champagne for our purchasers when we moved out last year.

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I think it's unbelievable people do that. When I moved here I was greeted with a nice clean place complete to lightbulbs and loo paper and a welcome card under a nice bottle of champagne!

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4961788.stm

House sellers regularly strip their old properties of anything of value when they move home, according to a survey.
Light bulb fittings, toilet roll holders and wheelie bins can often end up in removal vans, a report by Halifax Estate Agency suggests.

:lol:

I saw this on BBC Breakfast yesterday and it was just another attempt to prop up the housing market. What they concluded was that the only way to avoid all the excessive stress of a vendor removing a lightbulb or two is to ... wait for it... buy a new build property! Just when new builds are struggling. Strange that isn't it? :rolleyes:

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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