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Charlie Don't Surf

How To Invest In Etfs

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ETF's are normal shares so you can buy them from any stockbroker. I personally use Halifax Bank's Sharebuilder. http://www.halifax.co.uk/sharedealing/sharebuilder.shtml

There's also squaregain http://www.squaregain.co.uk/ were you don't pay commission when you buy shares.

For more info on what shares are available look at www.ishares.net

Edited by Too expensive to trade up

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Guest Riser

You can also get leveraged exposure to silver price using Warrants SC92.LCW. If silver moves above $15 you may see a multiple of your original investment yet if it moves well below $12 the worst you will end up with is nothing while they would be ringing up your Spread Bet account to demand more money if you didn' have tight stop losses. Another advantage with warrants is you also don't lose everything if a spike down takes ot your stops although they are teime dependant so you must keep an eye on when to sell.

The Silver ETF is launched Today so I am looking forward to some fireworks.

Edited by Riser

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I know rates can vary but say it's 0.5% and you buy £1000 worth of an ETF, do you pay £5 a year for the duration you hold the ETF or will it depend on the current price i.e. if it dropped to £500 you'd pay £2.50?

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No - the fee is deducted from the underlying "fund" and would be reflected in a slightly reduced yield. You don't have to write a cheque.

Ok thanks for the info, that makes them more attractive for me.

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One advantage of ETFs is that they are often excluded from the non-dealing regulation/policies in place at large companies (i.e. you work for BA, you are not allowed to trade BA without internal checks and often not allowed to trade in related companies without compliance sign off).

Many ETFs, as bundled, minimise the risk of conflicts of interest, so are exempt and attractive to many industry player who know lots about their industry and want to trade fast. That means, in my experience, more liquidity in the market (although of course that can be a bad thing if you are the less informed party in the market!)

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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