Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
ciderpunk

'brownfield Sites'

Recommended Posts

Didn't see this posted recently but it was news to me when I heard about the EDM;

http://www.uklanddirectory.org.uk/suburban...nfield-site.htm

Brownfield sites sound like the ideal way of preventing the ruin of open countryside — razing old industrial wrecks and replacing them with new housing, without damaging the environment.

But is that what brownfield actually means? Residents of areas with big gardens and detached homes have found — both to their profit and cost — that a garden can be designated a brownfield site as well.

Also;

http://www.cpre.org.uk/news-releases/news-rel-2006/19-06.htm

http://www.24dash.com/content/news/viewNew...D=1&newsID=4917

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the ultminate irony, whenever you see 'green' fields like playing fields, allotments or open public spaces within town or city boundaries people assume these are "protected greenfield" sites, far from it, all of the above are classifed as "brownfield", there is no legal protection afforded to them at all, they are fair game as much as an old factory site!

If you do a poll people say they want to protect "green" land like above, so they oppose development on "greenbelt" in favour of "brownfield"; not realising they are prompting the destruction of the very places they want to retain. Favouring brownfield development means the destruction of remaining green space like playing fields or allotments within our towns! Wake up you muppets!

Of course, the unused patchy scrubland on the edge of town will be afforded full protection of the greenbelt, but the village green isn't!

The vision of the future is for even the most modest of towns to become high density, high-rise concrete jungles without a blade of grass in sight, with countless flats without gardens, no playing fields for your children, no allotments to potter around in, no tree lined streets, no open spaces to walk your pooch, it will become a grimly packed Dickensian hell. People will be uncomfortably packed together much like hens in a battery farm, our masters want this, unfortunately most of our population are too stupid to realise, when they finally wake up it will be too late.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the ultminate irony, whenever you see 'green' fields like playing fields, allotments or open public spaces within town or city boundaries people assume these are "protected greenfield" sites, far from it, all of the above are classifed as "brownfield", there is no legal protection afforded to them at all, they are fair game as much as an old factory site!

If you do a poll people say they want to protect "green" land like above, so they oppose development on "greenbelt" in favour of "brownfield"; not realising they are prompting the destruction of the very places they want to retain. Favouring brownfield development means the destruction of remaining green space like playing fields or allotments within our towns! Wake up you muppets!

Of course, the unused patchy scrubland on the edge of town will be afforded full protection of the greenbelt, but the village green isn't!

The vision of the future is for even the most modest of towns to become high density, high-rise concrete jungles without a blade of grass in sight, with countless flats without gardens, no playing fields for your children, no allotments to potter around in, no tree lined streets, no open spaces to walk your pooch, it will become a grimly packed Dickensian hell. People will be uncomfortably packed together much like hens in a battery farm, our masters want this, unfortunately most of our population are too stupid to realise, when they finally wake up it will be too late.

How very useful though, the majority in defined areas, should in the future it be deemed necessary to restrict movement or erect (electronic) walls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How very useful though, the majority in defined areas, should in the future it be deemed necessary to restrict movement or erect (electronic) walls.

Quite so, the overtones behind all of these policies are quite clear.

An apartment in this publicly owned housing is also known as a logement, a lodging, which aptly conveys the social status and degree of political influence of those expected to rent them. The cités are thus social marginalization made concrete: bureaucratically planned from their windows to their roofs, with no history of their own or organic connection to anything that previously existed on their sites, they convey the impression that, in the event of serious trouble, they could be cut off from the rest of the world by switching off the trains and by blockading with a tank or two the highways that pass through them, (usually with a concrete wall on either side), from the rest of France to the better parts of Paris. I recalled the words of an Afrikaner in South Africa, who explained to me the principle according to which only a single road connected black townships to the white cities: once it was sealed off by an armored car, “the blacks can foul only their own nest."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 339 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.