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BillyShears

The Grammar And Spelling Thread

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There seems to be a lot of poor spelling on this forum. Oh alright then, all forums. It's a well known commandment when submitting papers to academic journals that you check the spelling very carefully because errors will give a bad impression to the referees. And yes, this is a mistake that I have made myself.

I suggest that in this thread, we all post on the spelling an grammar errors that annoy us most and appear most commonly in this board. If we then read all the postings, we'll learn from each other and the postings we make will look more impressive.

I'll start with "your" and "you're".

"Your" refers to something that you own, or part of you. E.g. "where are your socks?" "You have forfeited your deposit because I found a spider in the bathroom." "Your tiny hand is frozen."

"You're" is a shortened version of "you are". For example "You are deceiving yourself if you believe that property prices can only go up." can be written "You're deceiving yourself if you believe that property prices can only go up." Similarly with "You're crusing for a bruising." "You're so vain".

If you're unsure which one to use, try using "you are" in place of "your" or "you're" to see which one makes sense. For example, "I'm partial to your abracadabra" doesn't make sense as "I'm partial to you are abracadabra.". But "Your going home in an ambulance." does make sense as "You are going home in an ambulance.", and hence the proper way of writing it is "You're going home in an ambulance.".

Just another short one. If you wish to show agreement with someone and appreciation for something that they have said, the correct words are "hear hear" not the, it seems, more frequent mis-spelling "here here".

Now, who can explain the split infinitive to us?

Billy Shears

Edited by BillyShears

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Billy, you spelt ambulance wrong. However I agree with the thread

Fixed. I did say that it was about learning from each other and that I wasn't perfect.

Billy Shears

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some of my personal bugbears, many in use on the forum today. If you don't know which one should be used when, look it up :)

its and it's

populous and populace

feint and faint

they're, their and there

and the ones that really make me grit my teeth:

any crimes of the apostrophe

"Here here" - IT'S "HEAR HEAR", PEOPLE

:lol:

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Billy, you spelt ambulance wrong. However I agree with the thread

Instead of using the word ambulance Billy should have said " You're going home in a nerr nerr nerr nerr" :D

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This is an internet disscussion forum, not an o level english essay. Bad or hurried typing does not equate bad spelling or ignorance

Owww fork your shight.....

Who cares if there are a few spelling mistakes and grammar errors.

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This is an internet disscussion forum, not an o level english essay. Bad or hurried typing does not equate bad spelling or ignorance

But it makes a damn good impression of ignorance.

Billy Shears

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This is an internet disscussion forum, not an o level english essay. Bad or hurried typing does not equate bad spelling or ignorance

There's a difference between typos and bad spelling/grammar, though, and normally it's very clear from the sense whether someone has just mistyped in a hurry, or doesn't know how to write correctly int he first place. I type too fast and am always writing "shoudl" or "woudl" or somesuch by mistake but it's obvious from that that it's a typo. Using "populous" when you mean "populace" or writing "there" for "they're" are errors in written English, not typos.

This forum has lots of fab gimmicks - perhaps a spellcheck option would be good?

edited to say - spot the typo :lol: - but it's not a grammatical error! :lol:

Edited by Zaranna

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i'm too blooody busy trading to bother woth ryping properly, dman it, my ars ris on the line here, i have several calls on the go at once how i am supopse to keep everyone on hete happy as well as the boos.

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Now, who can explain the split infinitive to us?

Billy Shears

It's okay to split an infinitive. It's okay to end a sentence with a preposition. It's okay to start a sentence with a conjunction. It's okay to use sentence fragments (for emphasis). Shall I go on?

It's even okay for you Brits to stick your periods outside of quotation marks. (Just don't do it when you're on this side of the Atlantic.)

I do find improper use of apostrophes annoying, however. :ph34r:

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Apostrophe abuse. :angry:

Plurals do not have an apostrophe before the s. Possessives do.

There are lot's of estate agent's = WRONG!

There are lots of estate agents = RIGHT!

Exception... The posessive of it does not have an apostrophe.

A possessive of a plural has the apostrophe after the s.

Example... Two estate agents' buildings are close together.

An apostrophe can also be where two words have been stuck together.

Example... "There is a house on the corner" can be written "there's a house on the corner".

Also... People getting to and too mixed up :angry:

"If you are going too the shops I would like to go to" = WRONG!

"If you are going to the shops I would like to go too" = RIGHT!

Edited for typo :lol:

Edited by Bingley Bloke

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It's even okay for you Brits to stick your periods outside of quotation marks. (Just don't do it when you're on this side of the Atlantic.)

I do find improper use of apostrophes annoying, however. :ph34r:

Agree on split infinitives, etc - but there are special Brit rules for the full stops and quote marks - the full stop goes inside the quote mark if the quote marks enclose a complete sentence; outside if ending a sentence of which only a part is in quote marks. :lol: you get used to it.... :lol:

In addition to apostrophes, my other pet hate is the awful comma splice, which has started appearing in British English over the last four or five years or so (was very rare before). A fascinating phenomenon, but one which makes me tear my hair out when marking essays..... :o

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Guest Bart of Darkness

Well "loose" instead of "lose" seems to crop up a lot.

Is there any way to add spell checker functionality to the forum?

Other forums "elsewhere" seem to have a very poor standard of written English (i.e. it's incomprehensible).

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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