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Jason

Nice One Petrolprices.com

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4926134.stm

UK petrol prices could hit a fresh record high by the weekend, a fuel monitoring website has warned.
The average cost of a litre of unleaded looks like breaching the 95p a litre mark, said PetrolPrices.com.

But, but inflation is only 1.8%

Edited by Jason

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Wish they would tax petrol more to be honest. Cars are far too cheap compared to public transport :) I have a car, but dont really _need_ one.

I drive 400 miles on a weekend, not really wanting petrol to go up, but I do want REAL inflation to be seen and accepted.

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I think its plain daft that it is cheaper to drive than use public transport. In real terms, motoring has got cheaper, or stayed pretty much the same. Essential users (HGV's, buses, etc.) should get fuel tax-free, whereas personal users should pay through the roof, to get Britain a decent transport system.

smartie

http://www.gmroads.co.uk

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I think its plain daft that it is cheaper to drive than use public transport.

It is. Especially when you consider why...

I used to get the bus to work. It took an hour and ten minutes each way from door to door, largely due to the bus meandering through several housing estates and stopping for five to ten minutes at a timetabled location en-route. Then I bought a car and cut the journey to ten minutes each way from door to door. As a result, I got to effectively live for two hours longer every day! I could spend those two hours doing as I pleased, either at home or by working two hours overtime every day. Over a year I could earn up £6,900 extra just by working the hours each day that I would otherwise have spent sitting on the bus watching my life ebb away for no payment and unable to use the time for any personal enjoyment. My car costs nowhere near £6,900 a year to run so I'm effectively getting a free car with the cost of weekend and holiday use covered too, or two extra hours of life every day!

Using public transport needs to be better value than this before I'll consider it... Or my employer needs to either A: Pay me overtime for the time I spend commuting by bus, or B: Count the time I spend commuting by bus as part of my working day.

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5 pounds on the bus to go from my village to Stratford (about 11 miles). Thats about 1/3rd of a gallon of petrol or about 1.20? And I get free parking because I have "the knowledge."

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Don't forget the effing timing too - In the evenings you arrive 5 minutes before the stated time & it's already gone. The sods want to get home to a nice cooked meal & their wife and kids. So er... we'll get the taxi back then? Sorry you're going to have to try harder.

I'm (vin) diesel, 95p was several weeks back. :(

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It is. Especially when you consider why...

I used to get the bus to work. It took an hour and ten minutes each way from door to door, largely due to the bus meandering through several housing estates and stopping for five to ten minutes at a timetabled location en-route. Then I bought a car and cut the journey to ten minutes each way from door to door. As a result, I got to effectively live for two hours longer every day! I could spend those two hours doing as I pleased, either at home or by working two hours overtime every day. Over a year I could earn up £6,900 extra just by working the hours each day that I would otherwise have spent sitting on the bus watching my life ebb away for no payment and unable to use the time for any personal enjoyment. My car costs nowhere near £6,900 a year to run so I'm effectively getting a free car with the cost of weekend and holiday use covered too, or two extra hours of life every day!

Using public transport needs to be better value than this before I'll consider it... Or my employer needs to either A: Pay me overtime for the time I spend commuting by bus, or B: Count the time I spend commuting by bus as part of my working day.

BB that is a brilliant example of a "no-brainer situation".

Life is too short to throw it away.

NDL

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Bubb,

There has been a lot of speculation that the next rate move will be upwards which would appear to make sense in the context of the World markets and the fact that the current rate does not appear to have dampened the housing market to the extent that the BoE would, perhaps, have liked.

However, I acknowledge the CBI statements regarding inflation, which although a skewed measure, still carry an unfair power in the rate planning exercise.

This leaves me confused - up or down? What do you really think?

For my own part, I was interested in a story I heard about when I was in Boston recently. I understand that there has been a large amount of IO variable rate mortgages which have put people into a precarious position. However, although the headline rates had been going up, the banks had kept the mortgage rates down (don't ask me how they can do this; I guess they hedged their risk a while back). So there was a two track economy emerging in some areas.

Is there any scope for a similar situation here - leave rates the same (or, indeed drop them marginally to help the economy) and use various measures to encourage the banks to increase rates to dampen the housing markets? just a thought.

woody

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Petrol and all other natural resouce commodities will spiral in price as the worlds population explodes, and the race to industrialisation surges ahead.

You will see minerals and metals go way higher than the current record levels. Billions of Chinese, Indians and Africans want the US lifestyle, but we only have the one Planet folks.

Edited by dogbox

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The Oil Drum has prepared an excellent press release targeting the current debate in the US surrounding high gasoline prices.

A PDF version here: http://www.theoildrum.com/politics_of_oil.pdf

Web version with discussion is here: http://www.theoildrum.com/story/2006/4/26/121441/891

This should be required reading for anyone debating the high petrol prices.

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Petrol and all other natural resouce commodities will spiral in price as the worlds population explodes, and the race to industrialisation surges ahead.

You will see minerals and metals go way higher than the current record levels. Billions of Chinese, Indians and Africans want the US lifestyle, but we only have the one Planet folks.

****** - we will turn to renewable energy sources - once money is pumped into these oil has a limited shelf life.

We all know the oil companies have things up their sleeves for when things get tough!

Ethanol or biodiesel fuelled cars..

all this wasted countryside will to be get used to grow rapseseed and those who dont will be repossessed or something crazy

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OK, why don't the government just say, "right, in 5 years no more cars on sale that do less than 250mpg. oh, and they have to be able to take biodiesel".

for the reasons stated above, public transport will only ever have imited scope. a free market economy depends on the ability to transport goods, and to a fairly large extent, workers as well.

we have the technology - we can make very efficient cars. we just don't need to tug 2 ton monsters around the place.

or have I missed something?

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****** - we will turn to renewable energy sources - once money is pumped into these oil has a limited shelf life.

We all know the oil companies have things up their sleeves for when things get tough!

Ethanol or biodiesel fuelled cars..

all this wasted countryside will to be get used to grow rapseseed and those who dont will be repossessed or something crazy

IIRC it's been stated a few times on this forum by various posters that sugarcane/biodiesel is not a serious proposition as a large scale replacement as you need so much land to grow it there'd be non left for food production.

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Which is why the government should say something like this:

A policy based on the following framework (values are just indicative) should be adopted to reduce

energy consumption and CO2 emissions:

  • Minimum limit of 25mpg combined for any new car sold in the UK with this limit
    increasing by 1mpg each year indefinitely.
  • Scale road tax from £0 for over 60mpg cars to £1000 for under 25mpg cars with
    both these limits increasing by 1mpg each year indefinitely.
  • Motorway speed limits to be tightly enforced.

This would immediately remove the worst vehicles from the market but more

importantly send a clear signal to consumers and manufactures of future policy

direction.

That's what PowerSwitch included in their response to the Energy Consultation available here:

http://www.powerswitch.org.uk/portal/image...onsultation.pdf

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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