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kingofnowhere

Cpi Down To 1.8% From 2%

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http://www.statistics.gov.uk/

In the year to March, the consumer prices

index (CPI) rose by 1.8 per cent, down

from 2.0 per cent in February.

In the year to March, the all items retail

prices index (RPI) rose by 2.4 per cent,

unchanged from February.

Over the same period, the all items RPI

excluding mortgage interest payments

index (RPIX) rose by 2.1 per cent, down

from 2.3 per cent in February.

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Yes and every thing else you need to survive has gone up by two digit numbers.

Mafia accounting is less corrupt than so called official figures and all governments are playing the same game to rip us all off.

Blair must think we eat mp3 players for dinner each day to allow these figures to be release.

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Oh boy! Another post that crosses the party line! And not one comment. Normally the messenger gets shot.

Edit. I stand corrected. A riposte that casts doubt on the veracity of the figures. What a surprise!

Edited by Spring In The Air

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Oh boy! Another post that crosses the party line! And not one comment. Normally the messenger gets shot.

Edit. I stand corrected. A riposte that casts doubt on the veracity of the figures. What a surprise!

I would have expected to be shot, apparently inflation is surging

FWIW the biggest falls came from, but then no one spends money on food or drink here only on running their blast furnace, driving the 4X4 gas gussler, and living in their huge house getting big council tax bills.

The largest downward effect on the CPI annual rate came from food and non-alcoholic beverages due to a number of contributions:

• Milk, cheese and eggs, where cuts in milk prices led to a fall in the recorded average price of around 2p per pint in March;

• Vegetables, with good supplies leading to price falls for some produce, (including cauliflowers, cucumbers and lettuces) compared with increases last year; and

• Meat, (where prices fell this year) compared with little change a year ago.

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This is CPI for March. Milk and Cauliflowers down and the increase in transportation costs down.

April's CPI will be a totally different story. The rises in fuel costs that we are seeing now will hit the next CPI figure hard and the BOE acknowledged that in their minutes yesterday.

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http://www.statistics.gov.uk/

In the year to March, the consumer prices

index (CPI) rose by 1.8 per cent, down

from 2.0 per cent in February.

In the year to March, the all items retail

prices index (RPI) rose by 2.4 per cent,

unchanged from February.

Over the same period, the all items RPI

excluding mortgage interest payments

index (RPIX) rose by 2.1 per cent, down

from 2.3 per cent in February.

But public perception is very different to govt figures, which is a big concern for BOE along with HPI and surging oil, energy and commodity prices. Personally I wouldn't read too much into the montly figures. We all (including BOE) knows inflation is increasing. Next move to IR will be up despite all your (vane) efforts.

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But public perception is very different to govt figures, which is a big concern for BOE along with HPI and surging oil, energy and commodity prices. Personally I wouldn't read too much into the montly figures. We all (including BOE) knows inflation is increasing. Next move to IR will be up despite all your (vane) efforts.

Pardon, my efforts? I don't compile the CPI numbers? I have just reported that they fell below the central target. Which is much more relevant to UK housing than Interest rates may rise in "Insert any country where interest rates may rise" .Why my efforts, I have no influence on the MPC, and never think I do. Do you think by posting here they read you comments and you have any influence on them?

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=100...2otyE8&refer=uk

U.K. Inflation Rate Slows to 1.8%, Lowest in More Than a Year

April 20 (Bloomberg) -- U.K. inflation slowed to its lowest level in more than a year in March, easing pressure on the Bank of England to raise borrowing costs this year.

Consumer prices rose 1.8 percent from a year earlier, down from 2 percent in February, the Office for National Statistics said in London today. The rate was the lowest since February 2005 and below the median estimate of 2 percent in a Bloomberg News survey of 29 economists. Prices increased 0.2 percent from February.

Today's report suggests soaring fuel costs aren't fanning inflation, making it easier for policy makers to refrain from raising borrowing costs.

``We see inflation ending the year below 2 percent,'' said Marchel Alexandrovich, an economist at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein in London. ``It's a story of growth rather than inflation that will ultimately drive the MPC to action. We still think that rates are heading lower.''

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http://www.statistics.gov.uk/

In the year to March, the consumer prices

index (CPI) rose by 1.8 per cent, down

from 2.0 per cent in February.

In the year to March, the all items retail

prices index (RPI) rose by 2.4 per cent,

unchanged from February.

Over the same period, the all items RPI

excluding mortgage interest payments

index (RPIX) rose by 2.1 per cent, down

from 2.3 per cent in February.

Utter bulls**t and blatant manipulation of figures!

Looks like Browns strategy is to force a less compliant than he expected BoE into cutting rates via dodgy CPI stats

Edited by jp1

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Utter bulls**t and blatant manipulation of figures!

Looks like Browns strategy is to force a less compliant than he expected BoE into cutting rates via dodgy CPI stats

Have a look at the hurdle rate that fell out and say it was Bull. Last March lots of prices increased, and now they have fallen out, which is why the CPI fell. Along with food becoming cheaper offsetting rising gas and oil.

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Utter bulls**t and blatant manipulation of figures!

Looks like Browns strategy is to force a less compliant than he expected BoE into cutting rates via dodgy CPI stats

Absolutely and as I pointed out in another thread whilst the BoE keeps the future predictions of CPI under 2% they are under no obligations to raise IRs. And now with US rates not likely to rise much further even less pressure to raise IRs.

There is massive build up of inflation in the system and at some point it will have to come out. Factory input inflation is currently massive. Costs just aren't being passed on.

However as companies will probably choose to cut their workforce to improve profitability rather than pass on the costs it will be unemployment and not IRs that trigger this HPC

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Pardon, my efforts? I don't compile the CPI numbers? I have just reported that they fell below the central target. Which is much more relevant to UK housing than Interest rates may rise in "Insert any country where interest rates may rise" .Why my efforts, I have no influence on the MPC, and never think I do. Do you think by posting here they read you comments and you have any influence on them?

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=100...2otyE8&refer=uk

U.K. Inflation Rate Slows to 1.8%, Lowest in More Than a Year

April 20 (Bloomberg) -- U.K. inflation slowed to its lowest level in more than a year in March, easing pressure on the Bank of England to raise borrowing costs this year.

Consumer prices rose 1.8 percent from a year earlier, down from 2 percent in February, the Office for National Statistics said in London today. The rate was the lowest since February 2005 and below the median estimate of 2 percent in a Bloomberg News survey of 29 economists. Prices increased 0.2 percent from February.

Today's report suggests soaring fuel costs aren't fanning inflation, making it easier for policy makers to refrain from raising borrowing costs.

``We see inflation ending the year below 2 percent,'' said Marchel Alexandrovich, an economist at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein in London. ``It's a story of growth rather than inflation that will ultimately drive the MPC to action. We still think that rates are heading lower.''

I meant your efforts of brainwashing us into thinking that next IR movement will be downwards. One month's figure doesn't make much difference. What's the point highlighting it so much.

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There are; Lies, Damned Lies, and Government Statistics.

Does anyone here think that figure is a genuine representation of inflation?

Personally, I think council taxes should be capped at CPI-

let government live within their own figures

quite right. But what government would ever deign to practise what it preaches?

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Here's the full list broken down into the ONS' 85 categories

Liquid Fuels 25.79%

Gas 17.84%

Water Supply 13.55%

Electricity 12.95%

Water Transport 10.88%

Sewerage Collection 9.30%

Fuels & Lubricants (Motor Vehicles) 9.22%

Solid Fuels 6.77%

Maintenance and Repairs (Motor Vehicles) 6.63%

Other Services for Personal Transport 6.57%

Accommodation Services 6.35%

Other Services 6.33%

Financial Services 6.19%

Newspapers/Periodicals 6.00%

Road Trasnport 5.98%

Hospital Services 5.65%

Social Protection 5.61%

Health Insurance 5.20%

Recreational and Sporting Services 4.99%

Dental Services 4.91%

Services for Regular Repair of Dwelling 4.77%

Non-Durable Househol Goods 4.68%

Education 4.66%

Domestic and Home Care Services 4.66%

Medical and Paramedical Services 4.56%

Railway Transport 4.44%

Postal Services 4.12%

Fish 3.93%

Repair of Audio, Visual and Photographic Equipment 3.56%

Tobacco 3.56%

Dry-Cleaning, Repair and Hire of Clothing 3.53%

Sugar, Jam, Honey, Chocolate 3.44%

Cultural Services 3.37%

Hairdressing 3.33%

Rents for Housing 3.26%

Canteens 3.24%

Pets and Related Products 3.24%

Restaurants and Cafes 3.13%

Wine 2.87%

Spare Parts & Accessories (Motor Vehicles) 2.82%

Books 2.70%

Carpets and Floor Covering 1.83%

Repair of HH Appliances 1.81%

Mineral Water, Soft Drinks, Juice 1.60%

Coffee, Tea, Cocoa 1.53%

Jewellery Clocks and Watches 1.49%

Bread & Cereals 1.20%

Car Insurance 0.80%

Furniture & Furnishings 0.78%

New Cars 0.70%

Tools and Equipment for House and Garden 0.70%

Spirits 0.30%

Printed Stationary/Drawing Materials 0.20%

Telephone and Fax Equipment 0.10%

Fruit -0.31%

Oils and Fats -0.39%

Persoanl Care Appliances -0.49%

Meat -0.50%

Milk, Cheese and Eggs -0.70%

Pharmaceutical Products -0.80%

Other Articles of Clothing -1.00%

Major Durables for In/Outdoor Recreation -1.00%

Games Toys and Hobbies -1.19%

Other Medical and Therapeutic Equipment -1.20%

Products for Regular Repair of Dwelling -1.29%

Other Persoanl Effects -1.50%

Recording Media -1.61%

Garden Plants & Flowers -1.76%

Food Products -1.79%

Package Holiday -1.89%

Beer -1.89%

Motorcycles and Bicycles -1.99%

Glassware, Tableware, Household Utensils -2.68%

House Insurance -2.72%

Equipment for Sport and Camping -4.04%

2nd Hand Cars -4.58%

Garments -4.84%

Household Textiles -5.57%

Footwear -5.60%

Major HH Appliances and Small Electrical HH Appliances -5.85%

Vegetables -7.71%

Air Transport -10.18%

Equipment for Sound and Picture -14.34%

Information Processing Equipment -15.87%

Photographic, Cinematographic Equipment -27.59%

Edited by torko

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There are; Lies, Damned Lies, and Government Statistics.

Does anyone here think that figure is a genuine representation of inflation?

Personally, I think council taxes should be capped at CPI-

let government live within their own figures

The weightings are particularly interesting.

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/articles/econ...ET620_Baran.pdf

It's interesting that the weighting for electricity and gas is now only 2.6%, down from 4.2% in 1996.

Most of the reduction has gone to 'Other services', up from 0.5% to 2.4% and 'Financial services', up from 0.2% to 2.6% over the same period.

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I meant your efforts of brainwashing us into thinking that next IR movement will be downwards. One month's figure doesn't make much difference. What's the point highlighting it so much.

I'm brain washing you? Blimey my powers are greater than I think.

Personally I do think the next move will be downwards, as I think inflation will continue to undershoot the target and I think growth will be below. Therefore I expect the next move to be downwards. I'm not trying to brainwash anyone, I'm just posting what I think.

Indeed one months numbers don't, but the recent sets are showing inflation is contained, in fact its been falling since Sept.

Why highlight it, with one post? well I thought it was more relevant than all the posts about inflation or interest rates moving in overseas markets, or a 0.01 move in the US$ or Euro exchange rate that seem to clogg up this board. But ho hum, what do I know about what is relevant to this board?

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Absolutely and as I pointed out in another thread whilst the BoE keeps the future predictions of CPI under 2% they are under no obligations to raise IRs.

There is however one thing that could upset Brown's plans, the fact that a few months ago, the BoE admitted that they dont have so much faith in the 'official' ONS figures, and compile their own independently

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The Local Elections are crucial to B & B. A swing to other parties weakens them considerably. The Govt MUST release good figures in the run up to polling day. Problem is that the inflation data will just anger more people because we know it is a fib.

Edited by Realistbear

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The Local Elections are crucial to B & B. A swing to other parties weakens them considerably. The Govt MUST release good figures in the run up to polling day. Problem is that the inflation data will just anger more people because we know it is a fib.

What a coincidence!

Now look into my eyes, look into my eyes..

"Debt is good. Inflation is low. Get out and vote Labour [or else BNP will take over]"

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Here's the full list broken down into the ONS' 85 categories

Liquid Fuels 25.79%

Gas 17.84%

Water Supply 13.55%

Electricity 12.95%

...

Air Transport -10.18%

Equipment for Sound and Picture -14.34%

Information Processing Equipment -15.87%

Photographic, Cinematographic Equipment -27.59%

Compare the top 4 with the bottom 4! You can see why people know that the figures are an inaccurate picture of the increasing financial pressure more vulnerable members of the community face when trying to provide the essentials for existence.

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I'm brain washing you? Blimey my powers are greater than I think.

Personally I do think the next move will be downwards, as I think inflation will continue to undershoot the target and I think growth will be below. Therefore I expect the next move to be downwards. I'm not trying to brainwash anyone, I'm just posting what I think.

Indeed one months numbers don't, but the recent sets are showing inflation is contained, in fact its been falling since Sept.

Why highlight it, with one post? well I thought it was more relevant than all the posts about inflation or interest rates moving in overseas markets, or a 0.01 move in the US$ or Euro exchange rate that seem to clogg up this board. But ho hum, what do I know about what is relevant to this board?

I didn't say that you can brainwash me. I just said that you are trying. There are various factors ( and yeah including IR movements in other countries) which will affect BOE's decision. Oil, energy, HPI and public perception are the immediate worry for BOE. I don't look at what's happening one day and what's happening the other day. I think the long term trend in IR movement is upwards rather than downwards. Oil prices have started going up just now, so what relevance the figures since sept have. Wait for a few more months and then we will talk.

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Is someone fiddling the figures so that oil hikes have not even been factored into our actual spending yet (proportionate to the rises that is):

http://www.iii.co.uk/news/?type=afxnews&ar...&action=article

MADRID (AFX) -
Consumers should carry the burden of higher oil prices
, International Monetary Fund (IMF) managing director Rodrigo Rato said in an interview published in Spanish daily El Pais.
Rato said it would be necessary to "pass on new energy prices to consumers
", and added: "There is a very clear message, oil prices have reached a level which rule out a return to those of two years ago, to 30-35 dollars a barrel."
In the past, the IMF has stressed that
some governments
needed to adjust their subsidies for oil consumption if prices remained at high levels.
The International Energy Agency has also warned that oil subsidies being paid by a number of Asian countries to shield consumers from the price rises were unsustainable.

What a coincidence!

Now look into my eyes, look into my eyes..

"Debt is good. Inflation is low. Get out and vote Labour [or else BNP will take over]"

Yeah but, no but, shud up!

:lol::lol::lol:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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