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Guest growl

Keeping Track Of Public Sector Job Cuts

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Guest growl

After hearing on the news that yet another health authoritiy in the Midlands I believe is cutting several hundred jobs. It got me thinking that this seems to be happening on a near daily basis.

I wondered...where next.

Since it is no secret that much of the job creation that this Labour government has created in the last few years has been in the public sector. But although there has been a massive recruitment drive, and pay rises since the late ninties. Much of our taxes only funded these pay rises in all of the public sector, while front line services including health still suffered. This has meant that local health authorities have been forced into debt as central government chose not to increase their budget to fund the recruitment drive and higher pay.

Now we are hearing of the cuts to staff. It begs the question where next in the public sector.

I don't have the time to collate such figures, and I don't drop into this forum as much as I used to (time again). But since you lot out there are such a clever bunch, could somebody, if they have the time keep track of these figures. It would be very interesting over the coming months to see this information, even better in graph form. Perhaps the moderators could pin this post or put a graph on the home page.

Thanks in advance and hope.......Growl :)

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After hearing on the news that yet another health authoritiy in the Midlands I believe is cutting several hundred jobs. It got me thinking that this seems to be happening on a near daily basis.

I wondered...where next.

Since it is no secret that much of the job creation that this Labour government has created in the last few years has been in the public sector. But although there has been a massive recruitment drive, and pay rises since the late ninties. Much of our taxes only funded these pay rises in all of the public sector, while front line services including health still suffered. This has meant that local health authorities have been forced into debt as central government chose not to increase their budget to fund the recruitment drive and higher pay.

Now we are hearing of the cuts to staff. It begs the question where next in the public sector.

I don't have the time to collate such figures, and I don't drop into this forum as much as I used to (time again). But since you lot out there are such a clever bunch, could somebody, if they have the time keep track of these figures. It would be very interesting over the coming months to see this information, even better in graph form. Perhaps the moderators could pin this post or put a graph on the home page.

Thanks in advance and hope.......Growl :)

Just a start!

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The Civil Service is cutting jobs. My husband recently had to reapply for his post, and thankfully he was successful. 6 others in his division were not, and their old posts have disappeared. Although they have been offered the chance to relocate, redundancies are also happening.

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a lot of non essential jobs to go probably

dont worry we were employing people to do non essential work to start with (chasing bits of useless paper records, then filing them, then transfering them to computer etc)- makes sense to cut back - public sector is overinflated.

shoot me down in flames please

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Guest struthitsruth

The intention for reforming the NHS is a 10 per cent reduction in the workforce - about 100,000 jobs to go.

The employees' skills will still be required by outsourced service providers - if they can hack it in the private sector that is - think of the pension contributions that will be saved !

from a report commissioned for Reform by Nick Bosanquet - link

NHS MANPOWER: FROM QUANTITY TO QUALITY

A new Reform report today argues that the logical conclusion of the Government’s health reform agenda is a significantly smaller and higher quality NHS workforce. In Staffing and human resources in the NHS – facing up to the reform agenda, Nick Bosanquet, Professor of Health Policy at Imperial College London, shows that reforms such as foundation hospitals, payment by results and patient choice will mean greater emphasis on productivity and flexible working. The result will be the end of national pay bargaining, a reduction in the NHS workforce of at least 10 per cent and greater investment in staff of all levels.

;)

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And the irony is, I buy the Bournemouth and Poole Echo every Saturday, three quarters of the job adverts are public sector, usually:-

1 page, Poole Council

1 page Bournemouth council

1-2 Pages Poole and Bournmouth NHS hospitals

then there is

Christchurch council

Purbeck council

West Dorset council

All the housing associations

Various local Police forces

I reckon the job pages are still the same amount as 5 years ago, its just mostly goverment funded jobs now. So you cannot convince me they are trying to cut the number of civil servants.

The irony is, sometimes they use a whole page for about 6 jobs, how much does this cost? Most private sector companies use much smaller adverts which is more cost effective. But then the councils are just spending your tax money.

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The irony is, sometimes they use a whole page for about 6 jobs, how much does this cost? Most private sector companies use much smaller adverts which is more cost effective. But then the councils are just spending your tax money.

And most public sector jobs get given to internal candidates anyway. The stupidity of it is that the rules say they have to advertise all vacancies at taxpayers expenses, interview six candidates at taxpayers expense, and then tell them haven't got the job. I must have been to 20 interviews in my time where the whole thing was a waste of my time and theirs. The first job I went for in the private sector I got.

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I must have been to 20 interviews in my time where the whole thing was a waste of my time and theirs. The first job I went for in the private sector I got.

See, a lot of posters complain about public sector workers but I think its just jealousy. Look how many times you tried to join the club but you were found not to be upto scratch :P

Lots moan about the the perks etc but if it really is so great, why don't all the whingers work in PS jobs? Exactly! They aren't successful as they can't cut it :P .

Joking apart, I am a public sector worker and I can honestly say that my colleagues are hardworking and professional. More importantly, I absolutely love the work I do.

Edited by Buffer Bear

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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