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gruffydd

6,000,000 Now Work In Public Sector

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml.../ixnewstop.html

Gordon Brown's promise to cut thousands of Civil Service jobs was undermined by figures showing that the number of people working in the public sector has risen to almost six million - the highest level on record.

That is a lot of people who are going to retire at 60 and expect the rest of us to work till 70 and 75 to pay their pensions

Any Brownites out there (who aren't employed by government) I hope this makes you happy

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml.../ixnewstop.html

Gordon Brown's promise to cut thousands of Civil Service jobs was undermined by figures showing that the number of people working in the public sector has risen to almost six million - the highest level on record.

Yes--and Gordon just announced last week (through an intermediary) that he is adding 500 new civil service jobs to the CAB--debt counselors to cope with the surging debt problems caused by the "Miracle Economy" of never ending HPI and bottomless MEW. :lol:

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:lol:

That's nearly 6,000,000 guaranteed voters for a Brown administration.

The growth in the state contrasts with pressure on the private sector. The ONS figures show that the public sector hired an extra 57,000 workers in the final three months of last year, while 86,000 employees in the private sector lost their jobs.

They will need to ramp up their hiring to mask falling employment in the public sector, remember that "low unemployment" underpins the our stable miracle economy and sustainable housing market.

Edited by BuyingBear

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That's nearly 6,000,000 guaranteed voters for a Brown administration. [buyingBear]

While they won't all vote for the neo-Stalinists one suspects a disproportionate number will.

'Buying British votes':

http://www.thebusinessonline.com/Stories.a...6B-2E04DE8CD28E

Perhaps the most stunning socio-economic revolution of the Brown years has been the huge growth in the number of people who depend for their jobs, incomes, status and lifestyles on the government, a process which risks turning Britain into a permanent state of socialist-style dependency. The growth of Mr Brown's client-state has been truly phenomenal. Around 30m of Britain's 60m population are economically active (ie in paid jobs). Official public sector employment figures show 5.8m work for the government, or one in five, which is too high. Not for the first time, however, the official pseudo-statistics are misleading, hugely under-estimating the true size of the British state by using a preposterously narrow definition of the public sector which excludes state-financed university lecturers, doctors, contract cleaners at state enterprises and many other people who are state workers in all but name.

To get a more accurate assessment of the true size of state employment it is better to turn to the little-known Labour Force Survey, which measures state employment by asking workers whether they are in the public or private sectors. The result: at least 1m more work for the state than the official count suggests. Last summer 6.8m people said they belonged to the public sector, a worrying one-in-four of the workforce; the figure has since passed the 7m mark, despite Mr Brown's (bogus) crusade to cut civil service numbers. Labour is constantly boasting that 2m new jobs have been created since it came to power; but almost half are in the public sector, according to the Labour Force Survey. Today government is the biggest growth sector of the British economy: jobs in public administration, health and education, for example, are up 27% since 1997. When the state employs at least one-in-four workers there is much evidence from social democratic Europe, especially from Scandinavia but also from France, Germany and Italy, to suggest that market-led reforms to create a more dynamic economy become well-nigh impossible. Those who work for the state (and their families) become an influential and articulate voice in favour of tax-and-spend, powerful enough to block reforms based on smaller government and lower taxes. This burgeoning constituency against reform becomes even more formidable when you include those on the welfare state's payroll.

Last year 11.7m people claimed a state pension, 2.7m were on incapacity benefits, 400,000 on other sickness or disability-related schemes, 816,000 on the jobseekers' allowance and 761,000 were lone parents not in work and dependent on the state (another 191,000 were not in work but claiming various other benefits). The bottom line is this: a staggering 23m people either work for the state or are dependent on it for their incomes -- 52% of the British electorate of 44m voters; yet even that total does not include those on tax credits, subsidised farmers and other groups partly or wholly dependent on government largesse. According to the most recent household resources survey, 69% of households are now on some kind of welfare benefits. The reality is not quite as grim as these figures suggest, though it is still grim enough. Many pensioners have enough private income to receive only £45 a week from the state, which means that they are not truly dependent on government. So include only those pensioners dependent on welfare for half their income: even then, at least 44% of the electorate are either employed by the state or dependent on state benefits for all or most of their income. This sad state of affairs is entirely the consequence of Labour's cowardly failure to reform welfare and Mr Brown's public-sector spending spree, which has fuelled higher state salaries and more state jobs.

British public sector workers are now better paid than their counterparts in the private sector, enjoy better pensions and work fewer hours. So they have good reason to be grateful to Labour; and they repay it by voting for it. Welcome to the great buy-up of the British electorate: many of Labour's safe seats are now as socialised as the old Soviet states of Eastern Europe. Of the 200 constituencies where public-sector employment is highest, just 20% are held by the Conservatives, 70% by Labour; by contrast, in the 200 seats where the private sector employs most people, 50% are Conservative.

Parts of Britain are now almost wholly dependent on the state. In Manchester Blackley, 67% of the electorate are government employees or welfare clients, the figure is 67.5% in Liverpool Walton and a staggering 71% in Cynon Valley. In some areas where old-fashioned manufacturing or mining has long since died out, government has taken its place, leaving ghettos of dependency where there is no room for the market economy to breath. Such places will be forever dependent on wealth being generated in those parts of Britain (largely London and the south-east) which are not yet socialised; no wonder they are staunch supporters of Mr Brown's ever-expanding state.

Great Britain is now in the grip of a vicious feedback loop: the more tax-and-spend goes up, the more the number of those dependent on government goes up and the harder it will be for any reformer to reverse course -- and the faster the British economy and society will decline. Slowly but surely, Britain is becoming trapped in a social-democratic dependency culture; the country may even have reached the critical tipping point when reversing course becomes all but impossible because those with a vested interest in bigger government and higher taxes are too powerful to overcome.

Edited by Jeff Ross

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:lol:

That's nearly 6,000,000 guaranteed voters for a Brown administration.

that was probably the point.

they want to consolidate their powerbase so make as many people dependant on the state as possible.

control-freakery of the highest order.......sooner we are rid of this bunch of tossers the better.

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:lol:

That's nearly 6,000,000 guaranteed voters for a Brown administration.

They will need to ramp up their hiring to mask falling employment in the public sector, remember that "low unemployment" underpins the our stable miracle economy and sustainable housing market.

They will indeed! They will also have to do something about the worldwide trend in hiking IR to make sure HPI is also being underpinned by low rates!

Can anyone feel the end of the HPI nightmare is near? :lol:

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  • 342 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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