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Crazy People Queue All Night To Buy Upsidedown Houses

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heard a news report oon Radio4 this morning about a people queueing all night to buy one of these 'upside down' houses. there are 108 people camping out in marques to buy them.

These houses sold for £15,000 5 years ago according to the reporter

but people camping out are expecting to pay between 115k - 140k

Queues for 'upside down' houses

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I think Urban Splash have done a great job with these properties and in regenerating a no-go area. I even reckon they would make a good medium term investment because they are likely to become trendy and every one will want one. Not that I'm going to buy one of course. I think the best thing is to buy a derelict terraced house on some sink estate for the land it rests on and wait for a developer to jump on this bandwagon.

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heard a news report oon Radio4 this morning about a people queueing all night to buy one of these 'upside down' houses. there are 108 people camping out in marques to buy them.

These houses sold for £15,000 5 years ago according to the reporter

but people camping out are expecting to pay between 115k - 140k

Queues for 'upside down' houses

You can't really compare them to what they were. According to the plans I've seen they have more floor area due to the kitchen mezzanine and the ground floor being extended to the back, off-road secure parking and a raised terrace at the back that is larger and should get good sun compared to what it was.

A risky investment due to the location, but miles better value than most of what's for sale.

T&T

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They look pretty smart.

Can anyone tell us what the surrounding neighbourhoods are like?

It's Salford, waddaya think? Lived in Salford for 8 years. 8 weeks would have been more than enough. Salford in the recession & following years (88-96) was not a pretty place to be.

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115k - 140

is much much cheaper than all those silly appartments, with less space and bedrooms, just checked there is a ground rent charge of 175ukp per year..

Just checked rightmove, terrace houses are rather cheap in manchester? Seems to be a divide between cheap houses and expensive appartments

Edited by moosetea

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They look pretty smart.

Can anyone tell us what the surrounding neighbourhoods are like?

I went to University in Salford (albeit 10+ years ago now) and it was a very rough area then. If I was forced to walk through that area alone (I rarely did) I would have a small can of hairspray to hand (to act as mace spray) in case I got attacked. I was never attacked but many of my friends were.

Having said all that, it may have been regenerated now, but there were alot of problems there 10 years ago.

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Main website is here

http://www.chimneypotpark.co.uk/

Not sure how the garage system works.

Still salford though aint it.

Park, church, community centre.

Local shops include: post office, florist, hairdressers, tanning salon, chemist, video shop, chippy, sandwich bar, chinese takeaway, pizza place, bookies, tatoo and piercing studio, convenience store and a newsagent.

Fab.

So the poeple who work in these local shops live where? Can they afford to buy there?

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It's Salford - those dark, covered car parks are going to be a massive security problem - you may move in decent people to those houses, but the next street still has scrotes everywhere.

It's a decent enough idea, but surely it would have been cheaper just to knock them down and start again - after all the 90 year old walls they are keeping can't be up to that much. A bit of a gimmick and I bet they are a lot more expensive than a refurb of an existing terrace inc loft conversion.

Put it this way, I would not want to live there - for so many reasons of property and personal security.

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THats a stupid design...

the reason bedrooms are on the upstairs is because

1/ adds security. when people break in, they dont fall straight onto you. You at least have a chance to grab something before they make their way up the stairs.

2/ only spend a small percentage of awake time in the room. Imagaine having to walk downstairs every 30 seconds.

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It's Salford - those dark, covered car parks are going to be a massive security problem - you may move in decent people to those houses, but the next street still has scrotes everywhere.

It's a decent enough idea, but surely it would have been cheaper just to knock them down and start again - after all the 90 year old walls they are keeping can't be up to that much. A bit of a gimmick and I bet they are a lot more expensive than a refurb of an existing terrace inc loft conversion.

Put it this way, I would not want to live there - for so many reasons of property and personal security.

This kind of terrace refurbishment is a lot more pleasant in terms of human scale and environment than huge flats (when are they ever 'apartments'?) If you're taking of Manchester then just look at Salford Quays. Yes it looks very good at a distance and I'm sure jolly nice as an architect's model, but give it 20 years and it’ll be Victory Mansions a’la 1984. There are no amenities and is bloody windswept half the time. Compare this to Victorian terraces or semis that can provide a sense of place if placed in a sensible mixed used (ie. residential, shops, business etc.)

Edited by The_Equalizer

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This kind of terrace refurbishment is a lot more pleasant in terms of human scale and environment than huge flats (when are they ever 'apartments'?) If you're taking of Manchester then just look at Salford Quays. Yes it looks very good at a distance and I'm sure jolly nice as an architect's model, but give it 20 years and it’ll be Victory Mansions a’la 1984. There are no amenities and is bloody windswept half the time. Compare this to Victorian terraces or semis that can provide a sense of place if placed in a sensible mixed used (ie. residential, shops, business etc.)

I agree that it's better than row after row of flats with waste ground between them (Surrey Quays and Salford Quays spring to mind first). Salford Quays also has huge crime overspill problems from Ordsall - everyone I know who has lived there has had either a car broken into or stolen (usually repeatedly) and a lot have been burgled. As you say, it's also a soulless place to live.

I have no problem with the idea of refurbing houses, but the proposals are disconnected madness for a place like Salford - they intend making those under garden bit and the gardens accessible to all as thoroughfares - that' s been tried in the sink estates - it failed. And they are putting kitchens upstairs so you have to carry everything upstairs for no discernible reason - there is also less security in putting bedrooms downstairs, though by maintaining public access at the higher level, I suppose they have made it easier to break in there as well. Surely what people would have wanted was traditional layout houses extended into the eaves and then secure car parking either properly underground in safety and security or in a locked gated compound (if you have ever driven a nice car round Salford, you'll know why I think it's needed). They could also have still done the first floor balconied gardens without turning them upside down - it just seems to have no logic and be a gimmick for gimmick's sake. Plus presuming they paid sod all for the houses/land, they are VERY expensive.

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Like the idea. Don't like the prices.

Why do you like the idea? This is an honest question. I can't see the advantage of an upside down house.

Billy Shears

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I agree that it's better than row after row of flats with waste ground between them (Surrey Quays and Salford Quays spring to mind first). Salford Quays also has huge crime overspill problems from Ordsall - everyone I know who has lived there has had either a car broken into or stolen (usually repeatedly) and a lot have been burgled. As you say, it's also a soulless place to live.

I have no problem with the idea of refurbing houses, but the proposals are disconnected madness for a place like Salford - they intend making those under garden bit and the gardens accessible to all as thoroughfares - that' s been tried in the sink estates - it failed. And they are putting kitchens upstairs so you have to carry everything upstairs for no discernible reason - there is also less security in putting bedrooms downstairs, though by maintaining public access at the higher level, I suppose they have made it easier to break in there as well. Surely what people would have wanted was traditional layout houses extended into the eaves and then secure car parking either properly underground in safety and security or in a locked gated compound (if you have ever driven a nice car round Salford, you'll know why I think it's needed). They could also have still done the first floor balconied gardens without turning them upside down - it just seems to have no logic and be a gimmick for gimmick's sake. Plus presuming they paid sod all for the houses/land, they are VERY expensive.

I'm probably with you with regards this type of internal layout. It does seem a bit of a gimmick. However, I'm loathed to start knocking something that I hasn't been tried. If people want to pay this kind of money let them and see the results. Urban Splash seem to swing from one extreme to another. The well known Will Alsop chip number is a prime example, as discussed here:

HPC Chip Discussion!

What I am for is the fact that they haven’t flattened these rows of terrace housing which would have been the easy and soulless option. I'm not naïve enough to say that the lesson of replacing such housing with 'modern' stuff hasn't been learnt. I think it's one of two things.

The first and most powerful is developers find a quick and greater profit in 'apartments'. Property developers - a term that up until recently carried a certain social stigma - play the numbers game and have little understanding of the environmental impact of their actions.

The second, and I'm guessing here, is a 'working class' hangover of old is bad and new is good. Prescott's overseeing of the flattening the Welsh Quarter in Liverpool is exactly the case in hand. There's a certain association (factories, daily toll etc) this school of thought makes with Victorian housing and they find that unpalatable. Ironically, if this type of housing stock were to be generated, then it would probably foster a far nicer environment than the cul-de-sac Barrett homes that are viewed as superior (ie. haven't we done well for ourselves.)

Edited by The_Equalizer

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Guest Fiddlesticks

They could also have still done the first floor balconied gardens without turning them upside down - it just seems to have no logic and be a gimmick for gimmick's sake.

I was assuming that they'd designed the houses this way in order to make space for off-street parking. I guess the planning authority insisted on that. The only off-street space available would have been the old back yards and so as not to loose the outdoor space they decided to put a roof terrace on top of the garage. And then it seems sensible to put the living quarters upstairs rather than having to go through a bedroom to get to the terrace.

I can see the disadvantages of this, but I don't think it's that bad. But then I was brought up in a bungalow ;)

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I think Urban Splash have done a great job with these properties and in regenerating a no-go area. I even reckon they would make a good medium term investment because they are likely to become trendy and every one will want one. Not that I'm going to buy one of course. I think the best thing is to buy a derelict terraced house on some sink estate for the land it rests on and wait for a developer to jump on this bandwagon.

Or you could wait for John Prescott to bulldoze them and get half what you paid. Already happening.

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They look pretty smart.

Can anyone tell us what the surrounding neighbourhoods are like?

Put it this way, people would have probably paid you to take Salford properties off their hands a few years ago

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From the local paper

"The terraces of Langworthy have become notorious for crime and deprivation and their problems have been highlighted by a series of politicians including Jack Straw during a visit in 1998 when he was Home Secretary.

The houses were among more than 500 earmarked for demolition after Salford Council bosses decided to clear the area. All but 50 are now empty.

But in a radical U-turn the council has now said 400 close to Langworthy Road will be sold to Urban Splash.

Mr Bloxham said: “We believe Langworthy is an area with great potential. Some people believe there is no demand for this type of Victorian terrace, but we see the same type of house selling in Didsbury and London. They call this type of house a mews and they are highly sought after."

The UN won't go there as it's too dangerous. They presumably got the houses for virtually free and are making a very fat profit out of the houses..... - the Council gets someone else to try to drag up the area whilst still having the same people living nearby - gentrification - it will need fortressification...

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From the local paper

"The terraces of Langworthy have become notorious for crime and deprivation and their problems have been highlighted by a series of politicians including Jack Straw during a visit in 1998 when he was Home Secretary.

The houses were among more than 500 earmarked for demolition after Salford Council bosses decided to clear the area. All but 50 are now empty.

But in a radical U-turn the council has now said 400 close to Langworthy Road will be sold to Urban Splash.

Mr Bloxham said: “We believe Langworthy is an area with great potential. Some people believe there is no demand for this type of Victorian terrace, but we see the same type of house selling in Didsbury and London. They call this type of house a mews and they are highly sought after."

The UN won't go there as it's too dangerous. They presumably got the houses for virtually free and are making a very fat profit out of the houses..... - the Council gets someone else to try to drag up the area whilst still having the same people living nearby - gentrification - it will need fortressification...

Did you have any better ideas for what to do with those houses?

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  • 339 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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