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DonnieDarker

The Capitals Up & Comg Areas - Even Time Out Is Spinning

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Anyone read this week's Time Out (London)...they are spinning a load of cr@p about how Harlesden and Wood Green ar the next big things in the capital.

I have written to their editor and had a pop at this blatant VI spin on areas the journos live in themselves.

The funniest comment (and most transparent admission that the writer is hawking their area) is on Wood Green (n22).

"Local Tribe: Go-getter media sorts who buy the Guardian..."

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I lived in Wood Green for a few years and I can tell you that the Local Tribe is actually...

...a patchwork "community" of immigrants from East Europe, Poland and Turkey mixed in with angry young blacks who feel (with some justice) that their neighbourhood's sense of identity is being corroded by the drip-drip-drip of Blairite multiculturalist tosh.

Edited by DonnieDarker

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Anyone read this week's Time Out (London)...they are spinning a load of cr@p about how Harlesden and Wood Green ar the next big things in the capital.

I have written to their editor and had a pop at this blatant VI spin on areas the journos live in themselves.

The funniest comment (and most transparent admission that the writer is hawking their area) is on Wood Green (n22).

"Local Tribe: Go-getter media sorts who buy the Guardian..."

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I lived in Wood Green for a few years and I can tell you that the Local Tribe is actually...

...a patchwork "community" of immigrants from East Europe, Poland and Turkey mixed in with angry young blacks who feel (with some justice) that their neighbourhood's sense of identity is being corroded by the drip-drip-drip of Blairite multiculturalist tosh.

Wood Green! :lol:

the only things up and coming about that area already upped and left. What a waste of advertising space (sorry, copy)... even the most impressionable FTB will see how much of a fantasy that assessment is with only a cursory inspection. Mind you, some idiot BTLs might get hooked - after all, they don't actually have to live there - although I don't expect the yields in WG to be worthwhile??

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They did the feature on the back of WhistleBlower...let's do something to target FTBs they must have thought. :o

I've suggested they write something intelligent on the unaffordability of living in the capital...after all they do prize themselves as being the Capital's Bible.

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As far as rents are concerned, looks like a three bed property in Wood Green will be somewhere in the region of 250K to buy, and 270pw to rent. That's about 5.6% gross return. Not worth it without capital appreciation.

Billy Shears

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Got it - unbelievable. There's a lot of nervous journalists out there who've probably dabbled in property to supplement their meagre salaries. Train's slowing down and we've got to get some more fuel in the furnace. And the places they're talking about - Harlesdon, for heaven's sake. I lived near Harlesdon in 2000-2001 and yuppies were moving into it then. Prices will already have tripled. What a bargain!

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Got it - unbelievable. There's a lot of nervous journalists out there who've probably dabbled in property to supplement their meagre salaries. Train's slowing down and we've got to get some more fuel in the furnace. And the places they're talking about - Harlesdon, for heaven's sake. I lived near Harlesdon in 2000-2001 and yuppies were moving into it then. Prices will already have tripled. What a bargain!

What p*sses me off is the sheer lazinesss.

Instead of writing about the genuine plight facing a large proportion of TO's readership they decide to re-tread the tired walk of 'Up & Coming' (read: criminalised, run-down and dirty) areas in London.

THESE are precisely the kid of places where prices will plummet if there is a crash (Tottenham dropped 30% between 89-96), and precisely the kind of places that FTBs will get trapped.

Being trapped in a commuter-belt suburb is one thing but being trapped somewhere violent is another thing altogether - especially if the economy/society is up sh*t creek at the same time.

Edited by DonnieDarker

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My sister in law has just travelled up North with the Standard`s property section.... :o there is no end in sight to the wall of money that is being chucked at advertising property in the capital..Now I lived in London during the last correction..this is not, and will not be the same it is very very different this time IMHO <_<

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My sister in law has just travelled up North with the Standard`s property section.... :o there is no end in sight to the wall of money that is being chucked at advertising property in the capital..Now I lived in London during the last correction..this is not, and will not be the same it is very very different this time IMHO <_<

The Standard property section is a constant source of hilarity. Last week they were singing the praises of sandwiching (= moving a nasty area that lies between two slightly less nasty areas), and belatedly picking up on Finsbury Park as an "up and coming area" (actually a bit rough and already wildly overpriced).

The market here is all over the place in truth. The new-build prices and locations get more and more ludicrous, while some of the traditionally good areas stagnated years ago and have now been matched by inner-city hellholes. It's all overpriced to one degree or another, but some of it is more ludicrous than others, and if you see stuff like the Standard or that Time Out piece you're seeing some of the worst aspects.

I think that with stagnation or falls, a lot of the absurdity will fall out of the pricing - new-builds will fall and anyone who's bought in Tottenham (for instance) thinking it's up and coming will have a slow and unpleasant realisation that it's not a great place to live or own in.

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My sister in law has just travelled up North with the Standard`s property section.... :o there is no end in sight to the wall of money that is being chucked at advertising property in the capital..Now I lived in London during the last correction..this is not, and will not be the same it is very very different this time IMHO <_<

London is probably the one place that will fall least..... or at least the bits of it that are safer than Baghdad.

It's the rest of the country that's really pushed the market - on the whole most of central London hardly moved between 2002 and late 2005 - from my house hunting anyway.

There's a steady influx of young people who want a flat to rent, there's not in most of the rest of the country - and the wages are higher too.

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London is probably the one place that will fall least..... or at least the bits of it that are safer than Baghdad.

I agree with this - a lot of property in London hasn't moved up in price much in the last few years, and now it doesn't look as badly overpriced as the rest of the country in many areas.

But I think a bit of sanity needs to return to the market in terms of comparisons - there are family houses in Hackney for virtually the same price as similar in Hampstead, and pokey gardenless new builds at £300K up the road from reasonable flats for £100K less. I think the whole up-and-coming concept has elevated prices in some dodgy areas while decent areas remained stagnant, so the two have converged. The ludicrously overpriced stuff may fall, or some of the good stuff might float up a little, but it's all a bit out of sync at this stage.

Edited by Magpie

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Anyone read this week's Time Out (London)...they are spinning a load of cr@p about how Harlesden and Wood Green ar the next big things in the capital.

I have written to their editor and had a pop at this blatant VI spin on areas the journos live in themselves.

The funniest comment (and most transparent admission that the writer is hawking their area) is on Wood Green (n22).

"Local Tribe: Go-getter media sorts who buy the Guardian..."

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I lived in Wood Green for a few years and I can tell you that the Local Tribe is actually...

...a patchwork "community" of immigrants from East Europe, Poland and Turkey mixed in with angry young blacks who feel (with some justice) that their neighbourhood's sense of identity is being corroded by the drip-drip-drip of Blairite multiculturalist tosh.

Harlsden and Wood Green-is that the Time Out guide to the best crack dens? :lol:

I agree with this - a lot of property in London hasn't moved up in price much in the last few years, and now it doesn't look as badly overpriced as the rest of the country in many areas.

But I think a bit of sanity needs to return to the market in terms of comparisons - there are family houses in Hackney for virtually the same price as similar in Hampstead, and pokey gardenless new builds at £300K up the road from reasonable flats for £100K less. I think the whole up-and-coming concept has elevated prices in some dodgy areas while decent areas remained stagnant, so the two have converged. The ludicrously overpriced stuff may fall, or some of the good stuff might float up a little, but it's all a bit out of sync at this stage.

Family house in Hampstead is £1.5m upwards. Are you really saying that is the price in Hackney?

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Time Out did a similar thing in Edinburgh a couple of weeks ago. They were naming all these "up and coming areas" giving guides to prices etc. certain areas they claimed (most of which are actually ok Gorgie/Dalry/Easter Road for those in the know) had an average price of a one bedroom flat as being £70,000 if that was true I would have bought one months ago - it was as if the article was written about 2 years ago and they have just recycled it.

The £70,000 average is obviously b*****ks as there are only about 2 flats in any of these areas marketed so low and with the offers over system the average must be alot higher than they claim ~£90,000/£100,000 now for one bedroom?

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Harlsden and Wood Green-is that the Time Out guide to the best crack dens? :lol:

Family house in Hampstead is £1.5m upwards. Are you really saying that is the price in Hackney?

Not exactly, I was exaggerating slightly to make a point, but there are plenty of houses in Hackney in the £750K-£1 million region which is just ludicrous, for instance on Rightmove there is an admittedly big (7-bed) house by Victoria Park for £1.1 million, compared to a 6-bed in Highgate for £1.175 million.

Of course that's not my end of the market, but in stuff I watch (cheap 2-beds in North London) the prices are all over the place, and there are areas I regard as stupidly overpriced, while other areas aren't as bad. I think the differentials are wrong because good areas stopped going up once they were getting unaffordable, so people looked elsewhere, and gradually pushed the prices in dodgy areas up almost as far.

Or maybe people prefer to have a crack-den handy? I always enjoy the use of "vibrant" in EA ads - as in "close to amenities of the vibrant Kingsland Road" (= over a kebab shop at the rough end of Dalston)

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Not exactly, I was exaggerating slightly to make a point, but there are plenty of houses in Hackney in the £750K-£1 million region which is just ludicrous, for instance on Rightmove there is an admittedly big (7-bed) house by Victoria Park for £1.1 million, compared to a 6-bed in Highgate for £1.175 million.

Of course that's not my end of the market, but in stuff I watch (cheap 2-beds in North London) the prices are all over the place, and there are areas I regard as stupidly overpriced, while other areas aren't as bad. I think the differentials are wrong because good areas stopped going up once they were getting unaffordable, so people looked elsewhere, and gradually pushed the prices in dodgy areas up almost as far.

Or maybe people prefer to have a crack-den handy? I always enjoy the use of "vibrant" in EA ads - as in "close to amenities of the vibrant Kingsland Road" (= over a kebab shop at the rough end of Dalston)

Agreed, the prices are stupid relatively and absolutely. Who would live in Hackney if they can afford £1m?

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Agreed, the prices are stupid relatively and absolutely. Who would live in Hackney if they can afford £1m?

I've been living in Stoke Newington - upmarket compared to Hackney and I'm quite fond of it in spite of the rough edges and/or irritating Islington types - but there have been houses in N16 go for over £1 million too. Seems bizarre to me as for that amount of money you could be somewhere much nicer.

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I've probably posted this before, but here you go.

Back in the last crash (1989, just before it went titsup) my then Girlfriend decided she MUST get on the ladder.

Only place she could afford was Harlesden.

It was a sh!tridden drug fuelled murder hotspot even then, but apparently "the BBC are all moving to White City, so Harlesden will really take off".

I declined to get involved, so she borrowed a £25,000 deposit from her mother (the old dear's ENTIRE life savings).

With the media spinning at the time how great it was going to be there when the 'media types' moved in, the G.F. bought a 2 bed garden flat (well 1.5 beds, really) for £85,000

I split up with her not least because I HATED having to duck and dive thru the literally life-threatening streets of Harlesden at night to go see her. Within a month she was begging me to let her stay at my place cos she couldn't bear the menace, crime and shteness of the entire area.

Then the market crashed.

She was in neg equity till 1997.

It was't until 1998 she could offload it and give her mum the £25,000 back.

What a freaking nightmare. Strangely enough, it makes me think of a Heaven 17 hit popular around that time (or a bit before, actually). Can't remember the name of the song but the chorus went:-

It's happening all over again

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Spoke to a colleague looking in E8 at the moment and he says anything half-decent is under offer.

A little worrying...

But on the other hand does he really want to live in E8? About 15 years ago we used to have a board game that some Hackney squatters had made, kind of like Monopoly, but called "Destroy Haggerston". A few things have changed since then (a bit of dynamiting on the Queensbridge Road) but personally I still wouldn't want to live there now...

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But on the other hand does he really want to live in E8? About 15 years ago we used to have a board game that some Hackney squatters had made, kind of like Monopoly, but called "Destroy Haggerston". A few things have changed since then (a bit of dynamiting on the Queensbridge Road) but personally I still wouldn't want to live there now...

I'm just saying that an area like that is seeing a lot of activity from 20-something FTBs.

Apologies for sounding hysterical but I am getting increasingly worried this week at the news about the market in London.

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I'm just saying that an area like that is seeing a lot of activity from 20-something FTBs.

Apologies for sounding hysterical but I am getting increasingly worried this week at the news about the market in London.

No, I know, I do see your point, and you don't sound hysterical. It just reminded me of another old poster from that era "I know I'm going to heaven when I die, because I've done my time in Hackney"...

But E8 is the kind of area I see as overpriced for exactly that reason - I think a lot of 20-something FTBs overrate urban/zone2/10 minutes from tube/East/new-build and underrate other virtues such as gardens/safe (even a bit boring...)/acceptable schools etc. These things don't matter to them now, but for some they will in 10 years time, especially if they want kids. Inner city life may be good when you are renting and flexible, but may be less of a good choice for the commitment of owning.

Personally I think there has been a slight twitch up in activity and price expectations (may not reflect reality of course, not sure) in London but it's variable in different places - the East already seems overpriced to me, yet it still seems to be rising.

I may have already asked somewhere else but out of curiosity, whereabouts (roughly) would you ideally want to live?

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No, I know, I do see your point, and you don't sound hysterical. It just reminded me of another old poster from that era "I know I'm going to heaven when I die, because I've done my time in Hackney"...

But E8 is the kind of area I see as overpriced for exactly that reason - I think a lot of 20-something FTBs overrate urban/zone2/10 minutes from tube/East/new-build and underrate other virtues such as gardens/safe (even a bit boring...)/acceptable schools etc. These things don't matter to them now, but for some they will in 10 years time, especially if they want kids. Inner city life may be good when you are renting and flexible, but may be less of a good choice for the commitment of owning.

Personally I think there has been a slight twitch up in activity and price expectations (may not reflect reality of course, not sure) in London but it's variable in different places - the East already seems overpriced to me, yet it still seems to be rising.

I may have already asked somewhere else but out of curiosity, whereabouts (roughly) would you ideally want to live?

You are so right about the desires of 20 somethings to live in those areas...because I am ******** about advertising the area too much I can only tell you that the area I will buy in has many of the characteristics you list above as underrated virtues. It's North London.

I'll tell you all when I buy! :lol:

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I'm just saying that an area like that is seeing a lot of activity from 20-something FTBs.

Apologies for sounding hysterical but I am getting increasingly worried this week at the news about the market in London.

I live N1 and have stopped posting anything about London as accused of talking buls**t when i mentioned Autumn last year that prices are on the up here. Out for dinner 5 friends last nite. 2 are looking to FTB and they mentioned BS's seem to be offering lower rates than few months ago? Britannia just announced new 4.34 fixed 2yr. http://www.britannia.co.uk/unison/mortgage...ates/index.html

Islington properties were being remarketed after Xmas with price increases. The trouble is London media has been full of bullish news every single day for months now. Even radio news covers it in depth. People can see they can afford the repayments if they have ok jobs as many do in London. Interested DD are you friends saying the same thing?

Edited by beenhearingthisforyears

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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