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Jason

Nationwide Q1 2006 Regional Review

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http://www.nationwide.co.uk/hpi/review.htm

This doesn't seem to have as much information as Q4!

Theres a hell of a spread behind some of these averages. i.e. Outer South East - look at the end table; IOW +17%, Basingstoke +11% then Milton Keynes +1%, and from the commentary Malden -5.7%

This can't be "normal" - I would expect variation but a much tighter spread. Perhaps the big variations are being caused by small sample populations?

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It actually paints a very good picture of my sub-region, the East Riding of Yorkshire. Prices still seem to be picking up even though I myself believe I paid a *lot* more than I really wanted to for my house.

Is that good? :unsure::rolleyes:

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1 Sub-regional analysis is based on the average price per square foot in each of the sub-regions. This is grossed up by the average square footage in a particular region to arrive at an average house price. Unlike Nationwide’s main index this methodology does not take into account the different mix of properties transacted and is therefore a simplification. Because of the different methodologies the two series are

not directly comparable

Where do they get the data from for the regional analysis anyway?

It also seems odd that East Yorkshire is up 13% but Leeds is down 5%; this is a remarkably wide variation suggesting that people are moving out of the cities into rural areas perhaps?...

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% change over 1 year

10%

:o

The South West is the least affordable place for

first-time buyers behind London. Due to house

prices rising faster than earnings affordability

deteriorated in the first quarter of 2006.

First-time buyers on average earnings in the

South West would now spend 49.2% of their take

home pay on their mortgage payments

:blink:

Edited by vicster

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It also seems odd that East Yorkshire is up 13% but Leeds is down 5%; this is a remarkably wide variation suggesting that people are moving out of the cities into rural areas perhaps?...

I think that is what is happening here in the East Yorkshire, people who can afford to move out of Hull are doing so.

Edited by stormy

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I think that is what is happening here in the East Yorkshire, people who can afford to move out of Hull are doing so.

Im not so sure as prices in Hull itself seem to have risen quite considerably over the last year or two but where i live (villages on edge of Hull) i think the prices peaked around 2004/5. I thik this may have alot to do with the regeneration of Hull. I know alot of people round me who are having real trouble selling their houses.

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a little hard to say for me

NATIONWIDE Thu 6th April 2006

House price growth in East Anglia slowest in UK in Q1

http://www.nationwide.co.uk/hpi/historical/Q1_EA.pdf

HALIFAX Thu 6th April 2006

The biggest house price rises in the first quarter of 2006 were in Wales (4.5%), East Anglia (3.4%) and East Midlands (3.0%).

http://www.hbosplc.com/economy/includes/Ho...ndexMar2006.pdf

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a little hard to say for me

NATIONWIDE Thu 6th April 2006

House price growth in East Anglia slowest in UK in Q1

http://www.nationwide.co.uk/hpi/historical/Q1_EA.pdf

HALIFAX Thu 6th April 2006

The biggest house price rises in the first quarter of 2006 were in Wales (4.5%), East Anglia (3.4%) and East Midlands (3.0%).

http://www.hbosplc.com/economy/includes/Ho...ndexMar2006.pdf

that highlights what a joke these "statistics" are

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that highlights what a joke these "statistics" are

agreed - this is two measures nominally of the same thing; you couldn't make it up !

That is, obviously you can make them up, I mean you couldn't if you tried...

:lol:

Edited by camem'

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that highlights what a joke these "statistics" are

Let’s see, for East Anglia Q1/2006 Nationwide says £162,383 whereas Halifax says £167,366 – I make that about 3% different … :lol:

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OMG!

The London report is amazing...

Table on Page one is very good reference.

"A first time buyer on average earnings would now spend 54.7% of take home pay on mortgage payments compared to 39.6% four years ago. This is significantly higher than the 42% comparable figures for the rest of the UK."

Add higher Gas, Electricity, Water, Council Tax, Travel expenses and its quite easy to see why retail spending has nosedived even though many goods prices are falling.

Prices still rising but the growth level kicked into reserve in some areas (i.e. Greenwich).

- Pye (Property Speculation Ninja :ph34r: )

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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