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Ever Thought About Investing In Turkey?

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B) Altinkum in Turkey, has only recently been the front runner for overseas property investors. It has this advantage over better known holiday resorts such as Bodrum and Marmaris, meaning property prices are still low - at an estimate, like for like prices show a margin of as much as 40% in some cases.

Not only is property cheap but their is guaranteed sun, clean beaches and helpful friendly locals.

At this moment, Turkey is preparing new laws and regulations in order to become a full member of the EU. This process could take as long as 15 years. After that the prices of real estate will rise even more quickly than now, bringing property prices in Turkey to a level with everywhere else in the EU. Ultimately leading to mortgages for tourists. As you and I know this is the time to buy.

Altinkum is a beach resort situated in Didim on the west coast of Turkey. A pleasant holiday resort. Simpler than Kusadasi, Marmaris and Bodrum. Originally Altinkum was a small fishing village. At present 5 – 8,000 properties have been sold to British in Altinkum and yet still going strong. 3 years ago a 2 bedroom flat would have been £8,000 that same flat today would be worth between £25 – 30,000. Yet still property prices are rising.

What doesTurkey have to offer our clients:

· Properties at still very low prices

· Beautiful climate

· Beautiful blue flag beaches

· Well preserved environment

· Low living costs

· Healthy lifestyle

· Very hospitable people

· Schooling

· Environment full of History and Culture

· Tax facilities for foreigners

Additionally there are features exclusive to Altinkum which has only just started to impact the value of property in the area:

· New marina which has just received planning permission raises calibre of he resort

· Nearby water park, completed in 2004, widens appeal for families

· Local investment in the town centre has great improvements in the facilities

· New high speed road link from Bodrum airport, bringing transfer times down.

· Plans for a Golf course and a training stadium near the marina, attracting larger investors.

· Construction of a cultural centre. Completion by 2006. Housing a conference centre seating 300 people, cinema, cultural and historic display areas.

If there was a good time to buy it is now! I originally started investing in properties and now I have started to construct and develop properties in Altinkum.

Send me a PM if your intrested in investing

Edited by bargain mikey

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B) Altinkum in Turkey, has only recently been the front runner for overseas property investors. It has this advantage over better known holiday resorts such as Bodrum and Marmaris, meaning property prices are still low - at an estimate, like for like prices show a margin of as much as 40% in some cases.

Not only is property cheap but their is guaranteed sun, clean beaches and helpful friendly locals.

At this moment, Turkey is preparing new laws and regulations in order to become a full member of the EU. This process could take as long as 15 years. After that the prices of real estate will rise even more quickly than now, bringing property prices in Turkey to a level with everywhere else in the EU. Ultimately leading to mortgages for tourists. As you and I know this is the time to buy.

Altinkum is a beach resort situated in Didim on the west coast of Turkey. A pleasant holiday resort. Simpler than Kusadasi, Marmaris and Bodrum. Originally Altinkum was a small fishing village. At present 5 – 8,000 properties have been sold to British in Altinkum and yet still going strong. 3 years ago a 2 bedroom flat would have been £8,000 that same flat today would be worth between £25 – 30,000. Yet still property prices are rising.

What doesTurkey have to offer our clients:

· Properties at still very low prices

· Beautiful climate

· Beautiful blue flag beaches

· Well preserved environment

· Low living costs

· Healthy lifestyle

· Very hospitable people

· Schooling

· Environment full of History and Culture

· Tax facilities for foreigners

Additionally there are features exclusive to Altinkum which has only just started to impact the value of property in the area:

· New marina which has just received planning permission raises calibre of he resort

· Nearby water park, completed in 2004, widens appeal for families

· Local investment in the town centre has great improvements in the facilities

· New high speed road link from Bodrum airport, bringing transfer times down.

· Plans for a Golf course and a training stadium near the marina, attracting larger investors.

· Construction of a cultural centre. Completion by 2006. Housing a conference centre seating 300 people, cinema, cultural and historic display areas.

If there was a good time to buy it is now! I originally started investing in properties and now I have started to construct and develop properties in Altinkum.

Send me a PM if your intrested in investing

ISTANBUL – Turkish Daily News

Turkey, just behind China, is the second fastest growing economy in the world, with a 33.5 percent cumulative increase in real GDP in the last four years.

What makes this performance even more remarkable is that it has come along with rapid disinflation to single-digit territory when energy prices hit a new peak.

Productivity revival, thanks to prudent policies and structural reforms stabilizing the macroeconomic landscape and forcing economic agents to focus efficiency, is the key factor keeping Turkey's non-inflationary growth on track, according to a report yesterday by Morgan Stanley economist Serhan Cevik.

Labor productivity, measured by output per hour worked in the manufacturing sector, accelerated to an annual rate of 8.4 percent in the last quarter of 2005 and reached 38.5 percent, on a cumulative basis, in the post-crisis period. In turn, the elevated trend productivity growth rate, pushing the economy's production frontier to a new plateau, has helped Turkey's journey towards price stability.

Disinflation has come, as expected, to a temporary halt, because of higher energy prices. The consumer price index posted a month-on-month increase of 0.3 percent in March, slightly lower than our projection but in line with the consensus estimate. Accordingly, the year-on-year inflation rate increased from 7.7 percent at the end of 2005 to 8.2 percent last month.

“In our opinion, along with unfavorable base effects, higher energy prices and the inertia in non-tradable prices have contributed to a slowdown in disinflation in the second half of last year and then a temporary increase in the first quarter of this year,” said Cevik.

Encouraging changes:

Although fluctuations in the global oil market remain a risk to Turkey's fossil-fuel dependent economy, there are signs of encouraging changes in the behavior of non-tradable prices that used to obstruct the disinflation process.

For example, education and housing prices in the CPI basket posted year-on-year increases of 8.2 percent and 10.8 percent, respectively, in March, moving more in tandem with the headline reading. Furthermore, healthcare prices increased by a mere 0.2 percent, even outpacing deflationary tendencies in sectors open to international competition.

Therefore, despite a possible increase in the volatility of inflation, we believe that inflation will decline below the 5 percent mark by the end of this year and then to about 3.6 percent in 2007.

The investment bank's out-of-consensus forecasts are based on fundamental changes in the economy that should outweigh adverse effects of exogenous factors, as long as the government maintains fiscal austerity intact and accelerates the implementation of structural reforms.

Labor costs:

The recovery has turned into an expansion but is still not a threat to disinflation. Real GDP growth, reaching 7.4 percent last year, even exceeded Morgan Stanley's above-consensus estimate. Could this be a threat to the central bank's mandate to lower inflation to 5 percent by the end of this year?

“In our view, the composition of economic growth does not threaten the disinflation process and in fact supports the secular trend towards price stability,” said Cevik.

Investment-driven expansion, expanding the economy's supply frontier, has revolutionized growth and inflation dynamics. Even in the face of a doubling of oil prices and a 30.0 percent rise in private consumption in the last four years, the staggering 196.8 percent increase in business investment spending on machinery and equipment has supported the upward shift in the productivity trend and prevented an abrupt closing of the output gap.

Accordingly, higher productivity has lowered unit labor costs by an unprecedented 40.5 percent and thereby limited the rate of price increases, especially, in traded goods.

Reform driver:

Turkey needs microeconomic reforms to keep productivity growth intact.

Macroeconomic gains have moved beyond cyclical adjustments and raised total factor productivity growth from 0.5 percent a year in the 1990s to about 5.0 percent in the past four years.

“Productivity revival will continue enhancing the quality and sustainability of non-inflationary growth,” said Cevik. “That said, notwithstanding our macro enthusiasm, we are well aware of Turkey's microeconomic shortcomings.”

Industry and firm-level challenges, if not addressed properly, could become a threat in the longer run. This is why the authorities must act now and deal with structural problems that affect the business climate and consequently macroeconomic outcomes in the future.

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Turkey expects serious foreign investment in 2006, says Babacan

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

ANKARA – Turkish Daily News

Serious interest by foreign and domestic investors will likely push foreign direct investment levels well beyond last year's record $9.7 billion, Economy Minister Ali Babacan said on Monday.

Time was when attracting $1 billion in FDI would have been a good year for Turkey, but expectations have grown with a burgeoning economy operating under fiscal discipline, he said. In 2003 Turkey drew $1.8 billion in FDI, followed by $2.8 billion in 2004 and $9.7 billion in 2005.

“Expert analysts now estimate that 2006 levels of foreign investment could total well above the amount recorded last year,” said Babacan.

The economy minister, also Turkey's chief negotiator for European Union membership accession talks, credited Turkey's strong economic recovery from the financial crisis of 2001 to the economic reform program implemented by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) since it came to power in November 2002.

Macro benefits:

The establishment of macroeconomic stability has enabled the Turkish economy to enter a virtuous circle, he said. For example, foreign machine tool suppliers now offer long-term payment plans to Turkish industry, machine purchases that used to require cash up front. “Turkey imported some $20 billion worth of machinery and equipment last year, machinery with which local firms increase Turkish exports,” said Babacan.

The public debt of $200 billion last year represented a drop to 55.8 percent of gross national product from 63.5 percent in 2004, still too high but manageable under continuing fiscal discipline, he said.

The state budget this year earmarks nearly 30 percent for interest payments on the public debt, said Babacan.

Turkey last year signed a three-year, $10 billion standby agreement with the International Monetary Fund.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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