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Raven

Budget Question

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Can someone let me know if I have got this right.

as far as I can see, everyone is tipping petrol, booze and even a possible VAT increase in the up and coming 10th (and hopefully final) budget from Gordan 'Luckiest ever chancellor' Brown.

My question is that if he raises taxes on things that are included in the CPI to pay for his over-spending, will he not in turn be stoking the inflation fire? Surely tax rises will increase the cost of things, therefore adding to the inflation calculation, which will eventually raise rates.

Should we all be secretly be praying for huge tax rises, especially on things like second homes and stamp duty, as this will bring about the coming crash, that little bit quicker and more violant?

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Can someone let me know if I have got this right.

as far as I can see, everyone is tipping petrol, booze and even a possible VAT increase in the up and coming 10th (and hopefully final) budget from Gordan 'Luckiest ever chancellor' Brown.

My question is that if he raises taxes on things that are included in the CPI to pay for his over-spending, will he not in turn be stoking the inflation fire? Surely tax rises will increase the cost of things, therefore adding to the inflation calculation, which will eventually raise rates.

Should we all be secretly be praying for huge tax rises, especially on things like second homes and stamp duty, as this will bring about the coming crash, that little bit quicker and more violant?

Anyone know what time he starts today, is it 2 O'clock.

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Tax cuts usually lead to inflation, cuts are a green light to the retail sector that everyone can now afford to pay more, historically everyone goes out and pays more.

Tax rises just slow the economy and are generally to be avoided if they can be.

They also hurt competitiveness, productivity, efficiency and discourage investment.

However sometimes they are necessary, for example if you have to pay a million more salaries.

Think of any tax hikes today as infection worsening the wound. The wound being personal debt levels.

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Tax cuts usually lead to inflation, cuts are a green light to the retail sector that everyone can now afford to pay more, historically everyone goes out and pays more.

Tax rises just slow the economy and are generally to be avoided if they can be.

They also hurt competitiveness, productivity, efficiency and discourage investment.

However sometimes they are necessary, for example if you have to pay a million more salaries.

Think of any tax hikes today as infection worsening the wound. The wound being personal debt levels.

with tax hikes and house bills going up, surelly people are starting to feel the squeeze?

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with tax hikes and house bills going up, surely people are starting to feel the squeeze?

There's a definite squeezing in the climate. But I suppose it depends how everyone copes.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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