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75+ Property Market Graphs/stats For You To Enjoy!


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We've collected over 75 housing market indicators and statistics for our readers pleasure. There are a few demographic and economic stats as well. If you are looking for anything from the percentage of mortgages that are interest only to the historical house price to earnings ratio to the number of properties built each year by local authorities take a look. All the favourites are there, such as the historical house price inflation index and inflation adjusted house prices. (In fact someone used our initial inflation adjusted graph on this site back in August 2004 - glad to see it made such an impression its now made it to the HPC homepage!)

All the main statistics are available in this section of the In2Perspective website Property Market Statistics.

I would really appreciate any comments you may have on them, our website in general and our articles. It is all available for free, as are our email newsletters which you can subscribe to.

I've personally been following House Price Crash for a couple of years now and have even shared a pint with the great webmaster himself! If anyone reading this would like to pen a piece for our website please get in touch. We cant pay you but we can guarantee an audience - our news feed is carried by all the usuals newsnow, google news etc. and features on many other property websites.

Enjoy!

yours,

Nick Booker ([email protected])

Edited by in2perspective
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Oh OH Ohh Ahh :) I like :) book marked for good measure. How often are these updated? :P

1. Population against housing stock would be a nice graph :) it would show population growing 10% and housing stock increasing 30% :P

2. Is the MEW graph up there?

Edited by moosetea
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Guest Charlie The Tramp

No. This graph shows the ones with interest only mortgages

IO mortgages peaked between 1999 and 2000 when property was reasonably priced. :o It`s worse than I thought.

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Oh OH Ohh Ahh :) I like :) book marked for good measure. How often are these updated? :P

1. Population against housing stock would be a nice graph :) it would show population growing 10% and housing stock increasing 30% :P

2. Is the MEW graph up there?

1. We shall be adding exciting new features - like overlays - in the future ;)

2. Here is the graph for remortgage volumes. There is a lot more on the site seek and ye shall find - if anyone has any data/ideas you think we should pursue please get in touch. [email protected]

Nick

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Am I right in thinking house prices in Scotland & Northern Ireland have never actually dropped significantly then?

Kind of yes, in nominal terms at least, they didnt rise or fall as much in the late eighties boom. However, that doesnt appear to be the case now. Typically the further away from London the longer the ripple affect of economic prosperity (or trouble) is felt. Because the late eighties boom was pretty fast the northern Irish and Scottish had time not to go OTT before correcting. Our current boom has been more gradual that previous - therefore Scotland and NI house price inflation has been just as fast as in the UK but later than London - as you can see from the graphs on our website. (Halifax' data)

PS. Apologies for the fact they arent beautifully organised we are working on categorising them better and improving the accompanying content.

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in2perspective,

You have been following this site for a couple of years and decided TODAY to show us some graphs (Grateful of course)?

Did you not think of joining when you saw the pinned thread 'GRAPHS THAT WE NEED'? :)

Strange...

Anyway, THANK YOU for your invaluable graphs - your website is now bookmarked.

Some of this data is SCARY. No wonder they need to prop the market up - this could BANKRUPT the country!!! And they want to put Gordon Brown in charge of Nuclear Weapons????

- Were all DOOMED I TELL YA.... DOOMED!

Not that I would vote-in the incompetent a***hole!

TB

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

Did you not think of joining when you saw the pinned thread 'GRAPHS THAT WE NEED'? :)

A link to their site and a couple of articles by them have for a long time been featured here.

The links at present do not work since the upgrade but the matter has been reported to webmaster.

Clicky

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Well, there it is set out very nicely in blue and white. Affordability is only marginally above half that of the 1989 peak, and clearly explains why prices still able to go up this spring. On this measure another 50% rise is possible! :o;)

Home Movers - Mortgage interest as a percentage of gross income

home-movers-interest-payments-as-of-income-large.png

FTB Mortgage interest as a percentage of gross income

ftb---mortgage-income-large.png

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great stuff nick(in2p)

a very hearty welcome and your contributions are gratefully received.

Kind of yes, in nominal terms at least, they didnt rise or fall as much in the late eighties boom. However, that doesnt appear to be the case now. Typically the further away from London the longer the ripple affect of economic prosperity (or trouble) is felt. Because the late eighties boom was pretty fast the northern Irish and Scottish had time not to go OTT before correcting. Our current boom has been more gradual that previous - therefore Scotland and NI house price inflation has been just as fast as in the UK but later than London - as you can see from the graphs on our website. (Halifax' data)

PS. Apologies for the fact they arent beautifully organised we are working on categorising them better and improving the accompanying content.

have you got any graphs for Total debt(secured and unsecured combined) as a total of net income????

...I would bet the unsecured bit has risen sharply.

...it still doesn't give the whole picture,because the likes of utility bills,fuel and food still form a big chunk of consumers expenditure.

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We've collected over 75 housing market indicators and statistics for our readers pleasure. There are a few demographic and economic stats as well. If you are looking for anything from the percentage of mortgages that are interest only to the historical house price to earnings ratio to the number of properties built each year by local authorities take a look. All the favourites are there, such as the historical house price inflation index and inflation adjusted house prices. (In fact someone used our initial inflation adjusted graph on this site back in August 2004 - glad to see it made such an impression its now made it to the HPC homepage!)

All the main statistics are available in this section of the In2Perspective website Property Market Statistics.

I would really appreciate any comments you may have on them, our website in general and our articles. It is all available for free, as are our email newsletters which you can subscribe to.

I've personally been following House Price Crash for a couple of years now and have even shared a pint with the great webmaster himself! If anyone reading this would like to pen a piece for our website please get in touch. We cant pay you but we can guarantee an audience - our news feed is carried by all the usuals newsnow, google news etc. and features on many other property websites.

Enjoy!

yours,

Nick Booker ([email protected])

Write articles, what rather than change a couple of paragraphs and pass it off as your own work? "Honest Sir!" Only joking Nick :P excellent work, in2perspective is one of my reads on a daily basis, where did you guys disappear to for a month or two?

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This is one thing I cant get my head around......

House prices at record levels vs incomes

house-price-to-earnings-ratio-large.png

and yet

home-movers-interest-payments-as-of-income-large.png

Mortgage interest payments nowhere near where they were at 1989. I know interest rates are low, but interest rates have roughly halved since about 1988 yet house prices have trebled. Surely interest must be a bigger part of income?

Or maybe its because the movers already have loads of equity in their houses?

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This is one thing I cant get my head around......

House prices at record levels vs incomes

house-price-to-earnings-ratio-large.png

and yet

home-movers-interest-payments-as-of-income-large.png

Mortgage interest payments nowhere near where they were at 1989. I know interest rates are low, but interest rates have roughly halved since about 1988 yet house prices have trebled. Surely interest must be a bigger part of income?

Or maybe its because the movers already have loads of equity in their houses?

arghhhh you have been faster than me, I have exactly the same question, please help before I start to bang my head on the table!

TWT

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This is one thing I cant get my head around......

Mortgage interest payments nowhere near where they were at 1989. I know interest rates are low, but interest rates have roughly halved since about 1988 yet house prices have trebled. Surely interest must be a bigger part of income?

Remember the 'I' word? We have had 18 years of compounded wage inflation since 1988.

The graph takes ALL of the following into account -

1) Nominal house prices

2) Nominal wages

3) Interest rates

Items 1 & 2 effectively discount for inflation. Thus, at current interest rates, houses are indeed 'affordable'.

HTH. :)

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I have a different graph of affordability see attached. The graph attached shows mortgage payments as a percentage of take home pay and comes from the Nationwide. The graph is based on what mortgage offers were around at the time in the UK mortgage market. The assumption is that we are looking at initial mortgage payments (i.e. the first payment you make on a new mortgage). We assume the borrower earns the average wage and is borrowing 75% of the average house price.

Note, that in the mid-1990s typical initial mortgage payments were under 25% of take home pay. They are now over 40%. So, although affordability is better than 1990, it is worse than any other time over the last few years.

frugalista

affordability.gif

post-1586-1142993712.gif

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Thanks very much for your kind comments. Glad you are finding the stats/articles useful.

I cant resist saying "whistleblower" last night was hugely enjoyable to watch. It is a relief that this is being talked about. If you think estate agents are bad though the buy-to-let/investment industry is even more poisoned. The unwinding of buy-to-let will have considerable significance on the rest of the market for many reasons. eg. Media coverage and the effects that will have on the belief that "property always goes up".

Siginificant numbers of properties that would normally have been bought by FTBs have been 'snapped up' as 'deals' by buy-to-let investors. BTLs have an advantage over FTBs as they - normally - have equity to put down from existing property ownership and an income from the property (rent) with which to pay an interest only mortgage.

FTBs have made up an average of aroun 50% of buyers over the longterm but recently this has shrunk to around 20%. In fact in January the Halifax said there were 40% fewer first time buyers than in 2002. Maybe they all visited House Price Crash!

Edited by in2perspective
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Fantastic graphs

One graph I have been after for a long while (slightly off topic) is American Interest rates on the same graph as UK interest rates say over the last 25 years . I am convinced when the US rates go up the UK historically does the same

Thanks in advance

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Beautiful graphs...my only criticism (or suggestion)...any chance of getting graphs showing the data from the Land registry?

Very suspiscious about Nationwides data...

I agree. We shall be putting in the Land Registry data. Indexes like Halifax and Nationwide are useful in indicating trends because of their timeliness over the Land Reg...

You may be interested to know that Nationwide was 2 years ahead of Halifax in showing the nineties house price falls...

Witness...Nationwide HPI and Halifax HPI

Now, I dont want to get HPC readers too excited but if you look at that trend - Nationwide is quicker than Halifax in showing evidence of house price falls....then what do you think about this months HP stats....Halifax showed a nice 1.4% rise and Nationwide showed a.....modest 0.2% fall.

*Maybe someone would be intererested in starting up a separate thread to discuss this.

Edited by in2perspective
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