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Should We Stay Or Should We Go?

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My wife and I are in our mid-thirties and now facing a tough decision: stay in London or move to Africa? Your advice is welcome!

Without giving away too much about our personal circumstances, we have been living in London for two-and-a-half years free of rent, council tax and utility bills (all legally). This arrangement will end in the autumn, when we can go to work in Africa or stay on in London on just my salary.

Our first baby is due in July, and my wife will not be legally allowed to work here after then until well into 2007 (and she'd need to find a new job if she did). Which means we'd have to budgte on getting by on my salary of 46,500.

The trouble is, when I look at how this money would go, there's not much to live on. After tax, it's 2,660 per month. Rent for a reasonable two-person flat in London seems to cost at least £1,000. Add in bills and council tax, and we'd have little more than £1,000 a month for everything else. Quite apart from being a massive drop in our current standard of living (OK - maybe we've been living too well off for too long!), can you really raise a family of three in the capital on that sort of money?

The Africa option would involve my wife and I both working where prices are much lower; I'd be earning tax free. The big difference would be that we'd miss the first two years of our little one's new life - he'd be brought up by a nanny, and we'd only see him in the evenings.

So: Should we stay or should we go?

And, if the sums look so daunting for me, on well above the national average salary, how the h**l do other people get by?

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oooooooooooooooooo I sense some interesting replys landing on this thread in due course.

Me? I wouldn't like to bite comment :rolleyes: other than Africa's a big continent.

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My wife and I are in our mid-thirties and now facing a tough decision: stay in London or move to Africa? Your advice is welcome!

Without giving away too much about our personal circumstances, we have been living in London for two-and-a-half years free of rent, council tax and utility bills (all legally). This arrangement will end in the autumn, when we can go to work in Africa or stay on in London on just my salary.

Our first baby is due in July, and my wife will not be legally allowed to work here after then until well into 2007 (and she'd need to find a new job if she did). Which means we'd have to budgte on getting by on my salary of 46,500.

The trouble is, when I look at how this money would go, there's not much to live on. After tax, it's 2,660 per month. Rent for a reasonable two-person flat in London seems to cost at least £1,000. Add in bills and council tax, and we'd have little more than £1,000 a month for everything else. Quite apart from being a massive drop in our current standard of living (OK - maybe we've been living too well off for too long!), can you really raise a family of three in the capital on that sort of money?

The Africa option would involve my wife and I both working where prices are much lower; I'd be earning tax free. The big difference would be that we'd miss the first two years of our little one's new life - he'd be brought up by a nanny, and we'd only see him in the evenings.

So: Should we stay or should we go?

And, if the sums look so daunting for me, on well above the national average salary, how the h**l do other people get by?

Smiley, it depends whether you are measuring how your lives will be in a purely economic sense or more generally. Five years ago, OH and I decided to leave London - both in our mid thirties, we had a nice, but small flat, earned around 45,000 between the two of us but always felt like the proverbial hamsters on a wheel, just going round in circles, paying bills, etc. Now live of the coast of Africa - salaries aren't great, but quality of life is and I also think if we were still in London now, we'd be struggling to keep our heads above water financially (and that's without kids). I still have plenty of days when I worry about the future, financial security, all that stuff, but I think I'd be having the same thoughts in London too. The real difference is that I love the place I live, life's far less stressful and I can focus more on the things that are important to me. Wherever I live, there'll always be things to worry about, it's the things that give you pleasure that matter.

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If you've never been, go. Africa is a fantastic place, and if you don't live abroad when you get the chance, you're missing out. Forget the costs and think of the *experience*.

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SNIP

we'd have little more than £1,000 a month for everything else. Quite apart from being a massive drop in our current standard of living (OK - maybe we've been living too well off for too long!), can you really raise a family of three in the capital on that sort of money?

SNIP

In a word, no.

Why on earth would a non-native live in London / NY / HK / Singapore / Tokyo unless it was to earn a nice pile of money so that they could live somewhere else in relative luxury / semi-retirement in the near future?

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Hi,

I lived in Africa for 25 years and believe me, this country in heaven to whats happening there. I lived in East Africa, central Africa and Southern Africa and its all going for a ball of chalk.

Do not take your family, its Aids ridden. I was losing 20% of my workforce every year and that was in the mid nineties. South Africa has a murder rate of 25000 per year and a rape every 3.5 seconds. Belive me it has no security, My parents live in electrified armed response houses.

As for East Africa, working normally is just to satisfy Aid agencies requirements. Aid money is a drug for these countries and they are almost entirly dependant on it. All the clothes you give to charity are sold in markets.

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Hi,

I lived in Africa for 25 years and believe me, this country in heaven to whats happening there. I lived in East Africa, central Africa and Southern Africa and its all going for a ball of chalk.

Do not take your family, its Aids ridden. I was losing 20% of my workforce every year and that was in the mid nineties. South Africa has a murder rate of 25000 per year and a rape every 3.5 seconds. Belive me it has no security, My parents live in electrified armed response houses.

As for East Africa, working normally is just to satisfy Aid agencies requirements. Aid money is a drug for these countries and they are almost entirly dependant on it. All the clothes you give to charity are sold in markets.

It depends where you are in Africa. I know single people who have worked in the oil rich states in a fortress away from the squalor, maids etc.. all provided and all tax free. I have also met people who have fled S. Africa only to find thier family who stayed have been killed. At the end of the day only you know what you are getting into, but I would not look at life in pure number terms.

You only have one life, and working in a miserable manner jumping through pointless hoops for years is best left to the small businessmen of this country.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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