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spyguy

Hmo Parking

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Just got a letter from the council. I was expectingthis years CTax bill so I tore it open and started reading>

'Dear Mr .....,

We are sorry to inform you thatyour application for a residential parking permit has been rejected. Our records

show that there are alread two other permits allocated for the address'

Much puzzlment as I have already sorted out my parking permit.

Aha - those high fliers at he council have send the letter to tight wrong number but the wrong address. Such perfromance more than justifies the 4.3% increase in tax alone .....

Any how this got me thinking.

The letter was from a tennant in a shared house. There are a total of 4 people sharing the house (he'd photocopied the tenancy agreement). The guy looks like a sales rep - works for a copmany based about 150 miles away - God I hope he's not communting that distance!

This got me thinking to my days sharing.

4 was about average for a HMO.

All were working - the DSS does not do HMOs!

3 out of 4 needed a car. And I do mean needed - the smallest commute was 8 miles for a shift job.

1 person used the bus.

The local council is now enforcing a 2 car permits per house limit. Quite right, there was only space for 1 car outisde te house. Parking was a pain.

This will now make most central HMOs - large, Victorian houses, not viable as rentals.

Another council rules is no flat conversion without parking space.

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There are terraces near me where is it dangerous to park outside. Doesn't stop people though. One small bit of street is impossible to get down at the weekend or evenings because everyone parks up outside.

What's the answer?

Fewer cars. Less need to rely on cars.

The transport geezer was on about car sharing on a tiny bit of motorway today Leeds -Bradford - because of congestion...

We need radical solutions.

Personal petrol allowances? As part of a carbon points system?

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There are terraces near me where is it dangerous to park outside. Doesn't stop people though. One small bit of street is impossible to get down at the weekend or evenings because everyone parks up outside.

What's the answer?

Fewer cars. Less need to rely on cars.

The transport geezer was on about car sharing on a tiny bit of motorway today Leeds -Bradford - because of congestion...

We need radical solutions.

Personal petrol allowances? As part of a carbon points system?

underground car parks, on terraces?

Edited by moosetea

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Underground garages - nice idea... would be really expensive and don't know how you'd get the slopey drive bit on a narrow road

You could knock down every other terrace to make parking space if you were thinking radically.

None of them have gardens or back yards big enough to put cars in (all gated alleys too)

Edited by SarahBell

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Councils cause more problems than they fix. One department creates the problem - planning, high density infill, another then goes and uses prescriptive measures to take a second thwack.

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I had to rule out a nice new rental (central) recently as there was no parking for a block of 8 flats converted from an old victorian house.

8 flats: 3 x 3 bed, 5 x 2 bed. Needs for parking probably about 11+ cars? Actual parking available: none.

Its on a fairly busy street where people park during the day to avoid paying for a car park when going into town.

No parking provided = take £150pcm off the rental price.

Shame, a nice conversion but they'll struggle to get tenants as they are all upmarket flats and even chavs/students seem to have cars these days :lol::lol::lol:

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I live in a large Victorian terrace and parking has always been a problem, although most of the houses have two off road parking spaces via an alleyway round the back, there is no parking allowed on the road at the front during the day.

Around half of the neighbouring houses are split into flats/bedsits, at one point the house 3 doors down had six people all with a car each! As there wasn't enough space in their own garden they took to parking in everyone else's including mine :angry: We need both spaces, one for my car, one for my lodger's car.

The final straw was when I came home from work to find an old Rover 800 parked diagonally across both my spaces! I solved the problem by setting some metal bollards around my spaces in concrete, with a chain & padlock.

One of the neighbours then had the audacity to complain that I was preventing them parking - on my property :angry: :angry:

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The new builds where I rent are only allowed to have one very small parking space plus a very small garage. The 4 six-beds at the back of my house are all still up for sale - no-one seems interested :lol: . Apparently the builders aren't allowed to put in adequate parking because it's an assited transport zone - whatever that means :blink: . Just outside Milton Keynes.

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What's the answer?

Fewer cars. Less need to rely on cars.

Sure. Let's go back to living in caves.

The simple reality is that without cars what's left of an economy in this country would collapse. Public transport may vaguely work for London (though when I worked there I took the train to Paddington and then walked the rest of the way because the underground was so unreliable), but it sure as hell doesn't for the rest of the country.

I agree with the parking issues, but four people sharing isn't much different from having a family with two teenage kids living in the house. The council just don't want to spend any money to improve parking.

Edited by MarkG

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The new builds where I rent are only allowed to have one very small parking space plus a very small garage. The 4 six-beds at the back of my house are all still up for sale - no-one seems interested :lol: . Apparently the builders aren't allowed to put in adequate parking because it's an assited transport zone - whatever that means :blink: . Just outside Milton Keynes.

The large development near me has just had a big problem with this issue. The fairly top end houses only have one space each so people were parking on the road. This has caused problems with delivery/service/emergency vehicles gettings past so the company managing the estate have stopped on street parking and are clamping anyone that they catch.

p

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The final straw was when I came home from work to find an old Rover 800 parked diagonally across both my spaces! I solved the problem by setting some metal bollards around my spaces in concrete, with a chain & padlock.

One of the neighbours then had the audacity to complain that I was preventing them parking - on my property :angry: :angry:

If these are your spaces, would it be legal to put up a note saying that any cars parked there would be clamped, with a big fee to have the clamp removed. Could be a money spinner.

Billy Shears

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Just got a letter from the council. I was expectingthis years CTax bill so I tore it open and started reading>

'Dear Mr .....,

We are sorry to inform you thatyour application for a residential parking permit has been rejected. Our records

show that there are alread two other permits allocated for the address'

Much puzzlment as I have already sorted out my parking permit.

Aha - those high fliers at he council have send the letter to tight wrong number but the wrong address. Such perfromance more than justifies the 4.3% increase in tax alone .....

Any how this got me thinking.

The letter was from a tennant in a shared house. There are a total of 4 people sharing the house (he'd photocopied the tenancy agreement). The guy looks like a sales rep - works for a copmany based about 150 miles away - God I hope he's not communting that distance!

This got me thinking to my days sharing.

4 was about average for a HMO.

All were working - the DSS does not do HMOs!

3 out of 4 needed a car. And I do mean needed - the smallest commute was 8 miles for a shift job.

1 person used the bus.

The local council is now enforcing a 2 car permits per house limit. Quite right, there was only space for 1 car outisde te house. Parking was a pain.

This will now make most central HMOs - large, Victorian houses, not viable as rentals.

Another council rules is no flat conversion without parking space.

I live in a large central victorian house - there are five of us and not one car! Two of us cycle, the other three use public transport. An old housemate had a car but it got vandalised all the time, she moved and then it got actually properly trashed by people who'd nicked a car and gone around ramming it into other cars. A mentality not far from your average London car driver, IMHO! Can't imagine having a car in the middle of a city - why?! Take a train or pick up a cheap rental when you want a weekend away - who wants to deal with parking? And sitting in traffic jams all the time - what is that about?! No wonder London car drivers are all such crosspatches. I wouldn't live in London if I had to drive - awful quality of life.

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Guest Guy_Montag

Councils cause more problems than they fix. One department creates the problem - planning, high density infill, another then goes and uses prescriptive measures to take a second thwack.

This reminded me of a story my Dad told me, he was a teacher in the local school. It had a good rep & was always oversubscribed, with no room for expansion being a Victorian building. There had been small annex 5 minutes walk away, but the council flogged it for conversion into yuppie flats.

Anyway, a few years ago the nearby hospital was closed down & a huge development was planned (several hundred houses & therefore several hundred children). When my Dad, at a planning meeting, asked what provision there would be for the kids of the families that would move to the area, he was told by the planning official that this was not within the planning remit & would be dealt with by the education department after the houses were built. Someone asked a similar question about sewage & water, they were told that that would be dealt with by Scottish Water (or whoever) & it was not part of the planning remit to consider these.

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What's the answer?

Fewer cars. Less need to rely on cars.

The answer is for councils to be less greedy and maybe sack a few of the five-fruits-a-dayers or some of the tax abusers of the week.

Then they wouldn't need to put their yellow lines and residents parking everywhere to scam yet more money off the motorists.

Some places in London (Ealing for example) are even becoming flooded. The Council have stolen all the roadsides and made everyone pave over their gardens, nowhere left to soak up the rain...

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I live in a large central victorian house - there are five of us and not one car! Two of us cycle, the other three use public transport. An old housemate had a car but it got vandalised all the time, she moved and then it got actually properly trashed by people who'd nicked a car and gone around ramming it into other cars. A mentality not far from your average London car driver, IMHO! Can't imagine having a car in the middle of a city - why?! Take a train or pick up a cheap rental when you want a weekend away - who wants to deal with parking? And sitting in traffic jams all the time - what is that about?! No wonder London car drivers are all such crosspatches. I wouldn't live in London if I had to drive - awful quality of life.

Yes, but not everyone lives in London........ large Victorian houses exist in other places too. For the record I do live in a city with fantastic public transport, and I don't own a car. My folding bicycle does me very nicely, as does the Metro and Tram.

Why oh why they let these new build developments be built without underground parking I'll never know. Having to get the thing out of an appropriately designed car park is sufficient to stop people nipping down the shops half a mile away. Worked at my place in Germany, which was in the suburbs.

F***ing PPG. They haven´t a clue.

btp

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Muppets, councils enforce planning legislation that decends from central government. This includes the ridiculous 2 spaces rules even for large homes with adequate space for more.

My new build rental has an integral garage and one space as do the other thirty houses, add another 30 flats each with one space, no visitor parking and the entrance to the estate is chaos as we all own two cars so park on the narrow access road. The garage would be a tight fit for an Austin A30 so no chance my wifes Sedona would get in at all. We use it (just like everyone else) for storage.

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If these are your spaces, would it be legal to put up a note saying that any cars parked there would be clamped, with a big fee to have the clamp removed. Could be a money spinner.

Billy Shears

I think it would be legal yes, trouble is I doubt the worst offenders would have had the cash to pay the fee, so I would have ended up with a rusty D reg Toyota clamped in my space for the rest of eternity...

There was someone who left an old Fiesta in my space over a weekend. Although the doors were locked the boot lock was broken so I clambered in through the boot, wound all the windows down and left it like that during a thunderstorm :P He'd obviously returned to it at some point the following day and wound them all back up again, so I climbed in through the boot again, and this time let the handbrake off and pushed it a few yards up the road. They never left it in my space again after that.

Edited by Neil D Possitt

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The answer is for councils to be less greedy and maybe sack a few of the five-fruits-a-dayers or some of the tax abusers of the week.

Then they wouldn't need to put their yellow lines and residents parking everywhere to scam yet more money off the motorists.

You might feel rather differently about this if you live in an area where ALL the parking spaces disappear in five seconds flat, where resident's parking is the ONLY way you can get a space.

Last year I lived in an HMO in central Cambridge and there was so little parking - because of the road layout, nothing to do with the council - that at certain times you couldn't find a space. Even with a heavily-enforced resident parking scheme. On one occasion I had to park on the other side of town and walk home because every single space was filled; at midnight which, being female, I found less than enthralling. On other occasions I had to park on single yellows and move my car before 9am. One morning I had to sit in the car for half an hour waiting for someone to shove off so I could take their space. If it wasn't for resident's parking it woudl have been impossible.

Now I live about a mile out of town, still with resident's parking schemes, and it's still difficult because of the sheer number of parked cars. It isn't the council's fault, there just isn't enough roadspace. In Cambridge residents petition the council to introduce resident's parking schemes because parking is such a nightmare.

I'm just glad I don't commute because traffic here is terrible. The car is only used for work every now and then, and fortunately I don't pay for it.

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There are terraces near me where is it dangerous to park outside. Doesn't stop people though. One small bit of street is impossible to get down at the weekend or evenings because everyone parks up outside.

What's the answer?

Fewer cars. Less need to rely on cars.

The transport geezer was on about car sharing on a tiny bit of motorway today Leeds -Bradford - because of congestion...

We need radical solutions.

Personal petrol allowances? As part of a carbon points system?

People being able to afford homes near their place of work?

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they tried to create a parking scheme where i live, 600 houses in the area and that had 300 parking permits, and 200 spaces. 220 people wrote to the council, all but one complaining :P The scheme isnt going to go ahead 'in its current form'. There are alot of cars in the area, with more than half park on the pavement at night, but the cars go in the day, and there is a alot of moving around on saturday morning to get legal spaces. It kind of works as it is, its just not legal....

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You might feel rather differently about this if you live in an area where ALL the parking spaces disappear in five seconds flat, where resident's parking is the ONLY way you can get a space.

Absolutely. I used to live in Chorlton-on-Medlock in Manchester (Ok Ardwick) and it was right next to the city centre and the uni and so every term day my road was full of student cars.

Out of term time there was very little parking there so imo it was definately students.

It sucked. I didn't have a car - but if people came to visit during the day they'd struggle to park. Deliverys were difficult too - the poor tesco man had to wheel my shopping half way up the road once. The ambulance drivers were really cheesed off too when they couldn't get very close to the heart attack blokes house.

Further up towards the hospital people had the same problem with students AND hospital staff.

There are simply too many cars on the road. It is not sustainable to keep building roads and car parks.

We need a brave local authority/government to take the stand on this and really cut down on cars and invest in public transport massively.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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