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laurejon

Bricks And Mortar The Best Investment?.

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Some may ridicule the mantra Bricks and Mortar as the best investment.

However I think this is truer today than it has ever been in the past.

call for employers to be able to renege on pension benefits promised to workers was made yesterday by a member of the board of the pension watchdog.

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Alan Pickering, a leading figure in the industry, said the law should be changed to allow "a one-off opportunity for employers to renegotiate the past".

The call by by Mr Pickering, on the board of the Pensions Regulator and the author of a 2002 government report on pensions reform, looks set to deepen anxiety about future retirement incomes. He made his remarks at the annual investment conference of the National Association of Pension Funds in Edinburgh, where the main focus of delegates was on how to control the costs and risks of occupational pension provision.

A new Pensions Regulator was put in place in April 2005 to ensure that employers fund schemes properly. The regulator also created an insurance scheme, the pension protection fund, to cover payments to members of underfunded schemes sponsored by insolvent employers.

Amicus, the trade union, vowed last night to fight any attempt to cut pensions. It said: "How can you even think of depriving people of the hard-earned money they have put away for their retirement?"

An attempt to reduce benefits that have already been earned looks set to be the next battlefront for employers who are taking steps to limit future entitlements. It would run counter to legal precedents that bind solvent employers to honour all accrued benefits.

Employers are cutting the accrual of future benefits or slowing the rate at which they are earned.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

Bricks and mortar will always be the best investment when you buy just as a home at a sensible price.

Pay off the mortgage as quickly as possible. Always remember when you own every brick what else happens in life it can never be taken away from you. During very bad times I managed to survive and learnt that if you had no debt life was kind to you and the guy in debt who needed the job failed and I debt free always earnt a pound. I always remember the old saying and it is true, money always goes to money. It`s late now way past my bedtime.

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bricks and mortar are sound investments..... at the right time......

My intentions are to own two self sufficient properties. One in which to live, one to generate an income that is in line with what it costs to rent when i retire..... That way i will/should at least earn a decent basic wage that would cover the basics of life in the future, should i decide i want an easier life.....

I do not think that buying now is the best thing to do, i sold up last summer after 11 years with a mortgage.... And rent on the income generated through my lucky timing of the 90s market.... My bricks and mortar investment in 1994 (helped massively by some inheritance) was great....

This house was valued at £64000 in 1988, £52000 in 1992, I paid £42000 in 1994.....

Sold it for £165000 and paid my £30000 borrowing off....

I would be suprised if any period within the next eleven years prove to be anywhere near as profitable for the average homebuyer with a maximum mortgage.......

Im happy.... But expect to see house prices down noticably within the next 12 / 24 months due to unemployment and interest rates (and probably a few more conflicts around the world)..... It would be the perfect opportunity to pick up a couple of good quality houses.....

Sentiment will change, and when it does there will be plenty of choice for the people who have held back......

The best investment is the one that makes for a happier life...... And some unfortunate people are not acheiving that with bricks and mortar at the minute........

Most of the affordable FTB houses nowadays are in really bad areas, these are not really the sort of places where level headed buyers would in a relaxed market, choose to start a family etc. It has been a mad chase for any available affordable property at the cost of the whole of your working life..... What is the point ?

Edited by keepwatching

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Well I cannot see the Labour Party winning another election.

I am sure that there is really nobody left on planet earth who is anyway convinced that they are honest truthfull and trustworthy peddlers of democracy.

I suspect they will not want to go without a fight, but I am equally sure that when its time they will be gone and it will be with a crash not a whimper.

An illegal war, with another on the way, corruption from day 1, lying to the public, Fraud, favours to those whithin.

They have lowered politics to a new level.

I think they are out, and it will be sooner than later. The news for them just gets worse each week and that is what we know about, imagine what will happen when its all out in the open!!!.

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Some may ridicule the mantra Bricks and Mortar as the best investment.

However I think this is truer today than it has ever been in the past.

call for employers to be able to renege on pension benefits promised to workers was made yesterday by a member of the board of the pension watchdog.

ADVERTISEMENT

Alan Pickering, a leading figure in the industry, said the law should be changed to allow "a one-off opportunity for employers to renegotiate the past".

The call by by Mr Pickering, on the board of the Pensions Regulator and the author of a 2002 government report on pensions reform, looks set to deepen anxiety about future retirement incomes. He made his remarks at the annual investment conference of the National Association of Pension Funds in Edinburgh, where the main focus of delegates was on how to control the costs and risks of occupational pension provision.

A new Pensions Regulator was put in place in April 2005 to ensure that employers fund schemes properly. The regulator also created an insurance scheme, the pension protection fund, to cover payments to members of underfunded schemes sponsored by insolvent employers.

Amicus, the trade union, vowed last night to fight any attempt to cut pensions. It said: "How can you even think of depriving people of the hard-earned money they have put away for their retirement?"

An attempt to reduce benefits that have already been earned looks set to be the next battlefront for employers who are taking steps to limit future entitlements. It would run counter to legal precedents that bind solvent employers to honour all accrued benefits.

Employers are cutting the accrual of future benefits or slowing the rate at which they are earned.

Is this and EA ADVERTISEMENT?

Why buy bricks and mortar at todays overinflated prices when you could buy them for min. 20K less in a year.

That's -20K to start with + interest payments.

You only pay interest for the first 10 years, whose side are you on Laurejon, making or loosing money.

Advising or marketing?

Edited by music man

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Some may ridicule the mantra Bricks and Mortar as the best investment.

However I think this is truer today than it has ever been in the past.

call for employers to be able to renege on pension benefits promised to workers was made yesterday by a member of the board of the pension watchdog.

ADVERTISEMENT

Alan Pickering, a leading figure in the industry, said the law should be changed to allow "a one-off opportunity for employers to renegotiate the past".

The call by by Mr Pickering, on the board of the Pensions Regulator and the author of a 2002 government report on pensions reform, looks set to deepen anxiety about future retirement incomes. He made his remarks at the annual investment conference of the National Association of Pension Funds in Edinburgh, where the main focus of delegates was on how to control the costs and risks of occupational pension provision.

A new Pensions Regulator was put in place in April 2005 to ensure that employers fund schemes properly. The regulator also created an insurance scheme, the pension protection fund, to cover payments to members of underfunded schemes sponsored by insolvent employers.

Amicus, the trade union, vowed last night to fight any attempt to cut pensions. It said: "How can you even think of depriving people of the hard-earned money they have put away for their retirement?"

An attempt to reduce benefits that have already been earned looks set to be the next battlefront for employers who are taking steps to limit future entitlements. It would run counter to legal precedents that bind solvent employers to honour all accrued benefits.

Employers are cutting the accrual of future benefits or slowing the rate at which they are earned.

Not if the value of your "investment" falls.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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