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As someone who is now out of the market and ready to emmigrate the following makes good reading, http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/commo...5%5E601,00.html

I would guess we are headed for a global correction in house prices, Australia's base rate is amongst the highest in the world.

It has taken me well over a year to sell a 5 bed property in Lincolnshire... I am liquid and relieved...

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Just looking at some bits of this article:

THE downturn in housing markets is getting steeper and spreading beyond Melbourne and Sydney to other capital cities.  The RBA's latest review of the economy shows that inflation is in check and the bubble in the housing market has been pricked.

:D I paid Australia a visit last year

Across Australia, prices fell between 4.8 and 5.7 per cent in the September quarter. Treasurer Peter Costello yesterday welcomed what he described as a "plateauing" in the housing market.

How on earth is a quarterly fall of 5% "plateauing". To me a plateau is a flat surface, not one with a 5% decline.

A Commonwealth Bank survey shows that prices in Sydney have fallen by 15 per cent this year, while Melbourne house prices have dropped by 11.3 per cent.  Prices in Canberra, which until June this year had remained firm, are now down by 10.7 per cent, while Perth (5.6 per cent) and Brisbane (4.4 per cent) have also recorded falls. The RBA described the fall in the housing market as "orderly" and said it did not pose a risk to broader economic activity.

:o What?! "Orderly"? This is clearly crash territory.

It said, however, that there did not appear to be much risk there would be a renewed upsurge in the housing market at present.

So much for the spring pick up the bulls are expecting for the UK for next spring.

The RBA said lending for houses had fallen more rapidly than it had expected,

Did we not just hear similar news over hear recently?

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Western Australia is a wonderful part of the world, I have relatives out there. Good choice WGFA. BTW, how did you find the immigration process, or did you have Oz citizenship already?

I am on a 2 stage business visa, basically 4 years to establish a business to get perm residency. It is quite tough now and relies on having business experience in your country of origin.

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and you live where exactly?

I'm actually born and raised in Sydney. Moved here in my mid twenties and now been in London 6 years. I get paid a hell of a lot more here, taxes are lower and I get to travel the world.

It is always funny to hear Poms think how great it is in Aus. It ain't all good. Sure, going to the beach is great, but every weekend??? If only there was something else to do. Apart from spend the weekend at another beach 6 hrs drive away.

Still when I get older I'll probably go home. We'll see.

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I'm actually born and raised in Sydney. Moved here in my mid twenties and now been in London 6 years. I get paid a hell of a lot more here, taxes are lower and I get to travel the world.

It is always funny to hear Poms think how great it is in Aus. It ain't all good. Sure, going to the beach is great, but every weekend??? If only there was something else to do. Apart from spend the weekend at another beach 6 hrs drive away.

Still when I get older I'll probably go home. We'll see.

Please don't tar me with the 'rosey specs Pom' brush. My reasons for going are sincere, well thought out and not at all related to beaches.

I was born and raised in London...

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As someone who is now out of the market and ready to emmigrate the following makes good reading, http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/commo...5%5E601,00.html

I would guess we are headed for a global correction in house prices, Australia's base rate is amongst the highest in the world.

It has taken me well over a year to sell a 5 bed property in Lincolnshire... I am liquid and relieved...

Not easy is it? took me best part of this year on a 2 bed no-chain non-BTL - I exchange in 11 days and then it's bye bye UK for six months at the very least.

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I have a perm residence. We emigrated to Melbourne last year but my hubby wasnt able to get a job so we had to come back. To get the visa is hell in itself although its worthwhile for alot of prople as you only have to stay 2 years before you can claim citizenship. If anyone is interested in what you have to do to get out there and some of the issues concerning expats look at this website.

http://www.britshexpats.com

Its great out there..... but I wouldnt go again without a job lined up for myself and hubby. :rolleyes:

Spiders are bloody awful though. :ph34r:

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Great country Oz, spent 5 months out there in 2001-2002.

Perth was my favourite place,great beaches, but holidaying and living/working are two different things. I could see that there wasn't a lot of work around, the city centre looked pretty shabby and most people i met were employed by the state or in the tourist trade.

I remember being in Adelaide and trying to get some part-time pub work, and everywhere i went people wanted full CV's, for a crappy bar job!

I think you have a much better chance either going with a job lined up, or if you have a skill in demand, such as nursing, plumbing etc...... or at least one you can market when you get there like hairdressing.

But as has been said, if you get fed up with your local area, there isn't really anywhere else to go. Perth is the most isolated city on the Planet. Even Melbourne/Sydney are 500 miles apart.

As for the house prices, i'm not qualified to really talk about it. Suffice to say that my partners cousin lives in a place called Joondalup, a northern suburb of Perth. He's a police office who now owns 4 buy-to-lets. Apparently many of his mates on the force are also dabbling and becoming more landlord than copper. Not sure really what this means, aside from the fact that buy-to-let is even more rampant down under than here. From what i can see whole suburbs are being built and bought off-plan. Regardless of the fact that there aren't the people to fill them, and there aren't the jobs to support the prices/rents being asked. Who knows.............

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Spiders in melbourne arent so bad - huntsmen are a bit scary looking but harmless. However Sydney and its funnelweb population is a different matter.

Job finding in Melb wasnt too hard - I used seek.com.au and had a job within a month.

I can't vouch for Sydney but here in Melbourne the pices are holding up for houses, but there is huge oversupply in the apartment market and the speculators in this sector are taking a bath. People are realising that if they live an extra 20mins up the trainline they can have a 4 bed house on a quarter acre block for the same price as a poky 2 bed flat in what is possibly the windiest place on earth, Melbourne's docklands.

To the aussies living in the UK - London is a great place in your 20s, but in your 30's and with kids - if you had seen the decline in the place over the last 10 years you wuld agree it is really not the healthiest place to raise a family.

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We stayed in an area called Rowville - Melbourne suburbs. It was beautiful in parts and houses were huge and cheapish.

We had an infestation of Whitetail spiders in our rental which apparently cannot be helped... just one of those things. When you find one in your bed like I did I started to panic. They bite and have a potential to cause skin rot. Remember spiders and women dont mix :D

Hubby worked for 3 - heading up the video mobiles in the UK. No bugger wants one of these phones out there and the technology was so new nobody bothered with it.

It really does depend on your skills. Builders and hairdressers are in high demand but they choose Ozzys before going for anyone foreign.

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To the aussies living in the UK -  London is a great place in your 20s, but in your 30's and with kids - if you had seen the decline in the place over the last 10 years you wuld agree it is really not the healthiest place to raise a family.

I agree about London. but I must admit that the education system is so bad in Australia and the decline of the health system is also a mojor problem. Not to mention the fact that it seems that the population of Australia is getting less and less telerant of people who are different or have different beliefs to them.

If I were to consider kids in the next few years it would definitely be here in England, but probably not London. I just don't think Australian society would instil the values in my children that I would like.

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We stayed in an area called Rowville - Melbourne suburbs. It was beautiful in parts and houses were huge and cheapish.

We had an infestation of Whitetail spiders in our rental which apparently cannot be helped... just one of those things. When you find one in your bed like I did I started to panic. They bite and have a potential to cause skin rot. Remember spiders and women dont mix :D

Hubby worked for 3 - heading up the video mobiles in the UK.  No bugger wants one of these phones out there and the technology was so new nobody bothered with it. 

It really does depend on your skills. Builders and hairdressers are in high demand but they choose Ozzys before going for anyone foreign.

I grew up not too far from Rowville. I found it to be a pretty typical dull Australian "McMansion" suburb. The friends I have living in those houses constantly complain about the build quality.

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The education and health system in the UK aren't so hot either!! Sounds like out of the frying pan and into the fire to me.

My experience of the UKs NHS has been far superior to my experience of Australia's Medicare. It is nigh on impossible to see a doctor in inner Melbourne now that is bulk-billed (i.e. covered fully by medicare)

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  • 442 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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