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Jobless Total Up 37,000

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The claimant count rise is the biggest increase since December 1992
.

"And we expect house prices to continue rising underpinned by improving employment....." (VIs)

:lol::lol::D:):lol::):D

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ahhh now i get it

they're now giving btl mortgages to students

now they will be giving them to the unemployed

this must be what they mean by strong growth in the housing market

i guess being on the dole now will give you a verifyable income for submitting your mortgage application.And now with all the more single households instead of now buying a quarter share in a flat what they will do is give you a quarter share of a flat using plasterboard and wood screws.

so now the unemployed will own a quarter share in a quarter flat

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with all this negative data surrounding this country, when is the penny going to drop, and when will BBC start saying the big 'R' word.

If this country isn't in the grips of ressession then as kirsty would say i'll eat my hat

:P

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with all this negative data surrounding this country, when is the penny going to drop, and when will BBC start saying the big 'R' word.

If this country isn't in the grips of ressession then as kirsty would say i'll eat my hat

:P

Too true!

I may sound like a broken record on this matter but I believe we're in a recession NOW. Not next week, next month or next year but it's here NOW.

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with all this negative data surrounding this country, when is the penny going to drop, and when will BBC start saying the big 'R' word.

If this country isn't in the grips of ressession then as kirsty would say i'll eat my hat

:P

Havent you heard.....Tony & Gord are working on a soon-to-be-released NU-Lab UK Dictionary - V.2006

Amongst millions of others you can expect to see new definitions of 'Recession', 'Civil War', 'Terrorist', 'Stability', 'Socialism' and, in particular, 'Democracy'.

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Morning from Devon,

Have not posted for a while, but this is what is happening around me and my business that i own.

1. Sales are 35-40% down on this time last year. I import high quality German goods and sell to self-builders, renovaters and other wealthy clients around the country. Its not because i am missing business, its just nothing is out there.

2. Wife is an accountant who oversees many management accounts for clients in the Exeter area, and again its not good. Where people would take in £20000 a week its now £12000. All the busy people you see around have lost their wallets.

3. I said in November that sales were dire on the high street, and just for a short while in December it looked okay, but that came about from bringing January sales forward and spending heavly on advertising and leaving nothing to manouver this year. Magazines that i advertise in are weeping to get me to spend more with them.

4. Things will go on for a little longer before it becomes painfully apparant. There is still a wall of money out there driving up the stock market, but once that slows down it will be downhill.

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Blimey, no wonder people think IR's are on the up :lol:

Read what people put (im sure you do really, i dont think your as much as a prat as you make out :) ) rate rises are more likely to come through external presures.

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nodumsunreader has a point.

More jobless / recession = lower inflation = lower interest rates = higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession = lower average wage = lower mortgage affordability

Interesting balance and open to interpretation / wishful thinking either way.

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nodumsunreader has a point.

More jobless / recession = lower inflation = lower interest rates = higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession = lower average wage = lower mortgage affordability

Interesting balance and open to interpretation / wishful thinking either way.

Unemployed people can't afford high house prices. In fact they can't afford the rent either.

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Morning from Devon,

Have not posted for a while, but this is what is happening around me and my business that i own.

1. Sales are 35-40% down on this time last year. I import high quality German goods and sell to self-builders, renovaters and other wealthy clients around the country. Its not because i am missing business, its just nothing is out there.

2. Wife is an accountant who oversees many management accounts for clients in the Exeter area, and again its not good. Where people would take in £20000 a week its now £12000. All the busy people you see around have lost their wallets.

3. I said in November that sales were dire on the high street, and just for a short while in December it looked okay, but that came about from bringing January sales forward and spending heavly on advertising and leaving nothing to manouver this year. Magazines that i advertise in are weeping to get me to spend more with them.

4. Things will go on for a little longer before it becomes painfully apparant. There is still a wall of money out there driving up the stock market, but once that slows down it will be downhill.

Thanks for the info. Very useful, keep it coming.

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Unemployed people can't afford high house prices. In fact they can't afford the rent either.

So, demand for goods falls, deflationary pressure increases and to keep inflation in the target zone the MPC has to stimulate the economy by cutting interest rates which increases the affordability of mortgages for those in work, the vast majority of whom are not BTLers and so aren't looking for tenants. It's one way of looking at it.

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The claimant count rise is the biggest increase since December 1992
.
The number of people out of work and claiming benefit rose by 14,600 last month to 919,700.
That is the largest monthly rise since the economic slump of 1992.

http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/15032006/140/jobless-total-surprise-high.html' rel="external nofollow"> Edited by King Of Fools

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The number of people out of work and claiming benefit rose by 14,600 last month to 919,700. That is the largest monthly rise since the economic slump of 1992.

http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/15032006/140/joble...prise-high.html

[/indent]

Recession. Do we hear a faint but growing "awooga" coming from somewhere?

Times says 111,000 jobs lost November -January (see thread on this).

These are big numbers folks.

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nodumsunreader has a point.

More jobless / recession = lower inflation = lower interest rates = higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession = lower average wage = lower mortgage affordability

Interesting balance and open to interpretation / wishful thinking either way.

You've given yourself a little logic puzzle there then, as it can't add up can it dumbass :blink:

This is where your extremely basic understanding of economics and maths falls apart:

You should not be using = between any of those terms, as they are not equal and indeed do not even have an unbreakable causal relationship between them.

What you actually mean is:

More jobless / recession COULD LEAD TO lower inflation WHICH COULD RESULT IN lower interest rates WHICH WOULD LIKELY LEAD TO higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession USUALLY LEADS TO A lower average wage WHICH MAKES MORTAGES LESS AFFORDABLE (ON AVERAGE)

So there you have it... it was all a load of rubbish.

The causal relationships between these things range from LIKELY to POSSIBLE, and the effects would range from LIMITED (affecting few people) to WIDE RANGING.....

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You've given yourself a little logic puzzle there then, as it can't add up can it dumbass :blink:

This is where your extremely basic understanding of economics and maths falls apart:

You should not be using = between any of those terms, as they are not equal and indeed do not even have an unbreakable causal relationship between them.

What you actually mean is:

More jobless / recession COULD LEAD TO lower inflation WHICH COULD RESULT IN lower interest rates WHICH WOULD LIKELY LEAD TO higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession USUALLY LEADS TO A lower average wage WHICH MAKES MORTAGES LESS AFFORDABLE (ON AVERAGE)

So there you have it... it was all a load of rubbish.

The causal relationships between these things range from LIKELY to POSSIBLE, and the effects would range from LIMITED (affecting few people) to WIDE RANGING.....

I tend the credit people with the intelligence not to take = literally: who has nothing better to do with their time than to add endless qualifying language to off-the-cuff postings to a bb? The point remains that there are two opposing pressures.

I also don't engage in name calling with people I don't know from a bar of soap. Nor should you.

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More jobless / recession = lower inflation = lower interest rates = higher mortgage affordability

However, more jobless / recession = lower average wage = lower mortgage affordability

Interesting balance and open to interpretation / wishful thinking either way.

I understood what you were on about: I have no problem with = or spelling mistaces

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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