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South Sea Bubble

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Hello,

I dont want to be accused of spamming, because I'm not, I thought that this might be of interest to people considering the housing/debt bubble.

I've found these facsimilie packs of 18th Century playing cards, one of which is the South Sea Bubble. Its interesting to see the social impact & attitudes to Government **** ups of the day that left many people ruined. Each card has some "cartoon" displaying how people have been sh*fted, etc.

Might become quite poignant in the not too distant future - perhaps we could have a HPC pack of cards for comemorative purposes! I'm sure we could come up with plenty of captions for each card - wonder who'd be the joker?

The link is: http://www.subliminalpersuasion.co.uk/Cards.html

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I picked this up from a thread at Advfn...

(I have met the guy who said it- and consider him reliable):

Off Topic re Houseprices :

I sell central London riverside prooperties for a living for a big developer.

Client today: 'I do not want a stock unit ,I want to buy off plan to catch the gain over the next 18 months before it completes bacause I am buying at a discount'

My guarded response : 'You may be buying at a discount to future prices if they go up -that is correct.'

Client : ' Good, put me on the list to call when you release the next batch .

This is the sort of inane idiot I get almost every day. What I really find disturbing is the fact that there are a lot of people with a lot of money who are just plain thick. I am not selling rubbish in a rough area but prime site property at close to 1,000 quid a square foot.

So was I surprised to read in the paper today that many who leave University ( even some studying English Literature) can not string a sentance together or punctuate ?

I must admit that, as well as berating the younger generation for rolling over and taking it regarding house prices, the standard of literacy nowadays is very low.

Am I the only person who cannot even understand what young people say these days. They have a way of rolling all the words together with no enunciation. In my day we regarded people who spoke like the cast of East Enders as being poorly educated and, although it often wasn't true, thick. If you phone companies these days you either get to talk to someone whose first language is not English - but you may just have a conversation or, worse, you speak to a young English person you cannot understand.

I must get new batteries for the hearing aid.

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I must admit that, as well as berating the younger generation for rolling over and taking it regarding house prices, the standard of literacy nowadays is very low.

Am I the only person who cannot even understand what young people say these days. They have a way of rolling all the words together with no enunciation. In my day we regarded people who spoke like the cast of East Enders as being poorly educated and, although it often wasn't true, thick. If you phone companies these days you either get to talk to someone whose first language is not English - but you may just have a conversation or, worse, you speak to a young English person you cannot understand.

I must get new batteries for the hearing aid.

Hi Marina

Your comments make you sound like an old fart - but, unfortunately, I feel exactly the same.

Probably has a lot to do with 'txting' on their infernal mobile phones - why say something in three seconds at a cost of 1p when you can spend several seconds typing it out (admittedly at great speed) on a crap keyboard and spending 20p into the bargain!

Also a lot to do with grade inflation in schools. I left a famous old grammar school in the eighties with a handful of O-Levels and three A-Levels, then got a Desmond in Engineering at a 'red brick' university - I think I did OK to get this and I've had a decent career as a result.

These days, this haul would be laughed at - you get fifteen 'A triple star' GSCEs for turning up more times than you don't; an A at A-Level for getting your name almost right; and you get a degree in 'Ar$e Scratching Studies' as long as you don't mind going into massive debt.

One thing they miss in all this self-congratulatory, NuLab target exceeding glory is that the kids can't string a coherent sentence together!

God I must be old - can I borrow your hearing aid?

Cheers

LL

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Hello,

I dont want to be accused of spamming, because I'm not, I thought that this might be of interest to people considering the housing/debt bubble.

I've found these facsimilie packs of 18th Century playing cards, one of which is the South Sea Bubble. Its interesting to see the social impact & attitudes to Government **** ups of the day that left many people ruined. Each card has some "cartoon" displaying how people have been sh*fted, etc.

Might become quite poignant in the not too distant future - perhaps we could have a HPC pack of cards for comemorative purposes! I'm sure we could come up with plenty of captions for each card - wonder who'd be the joker?

The link is: http://www.subliminalpersuasion.co.uk/Cards.html

You can see these playing cards in detail here. Some of them are quite entertaining; for example, the Ace of Clubs has a group of women sitting around a table complaining to each other about their new-found poverty; it's accompanied by the caption

Ladies, whose Husbands are undone by Bubble,

Meet at a Tavern to Lament their Trouble;

At length, they all agree upon Petitions,

To Pray the state to Mend their Bad Conditions.

I suspect that we'll be able to use this one unchanged in a few years.

These come from a website at the Harvard Business School: it's got lots of interesting stuff about the "extraordinary similarities between the South Sea Bubble of 1720 and the recent technology bubble". There's a lot of historical material, and much of it sounds strangely familiar...

Edited by Scunnered

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I picked this up from a thread at Advfn...

(I have met the guy who said it- and consider him reliable):

Off Topic re Houseprices :

I sell central London riverside prooperties for a living for a big developer.

Client today: 'I do not want a stock unit ,I want to buy off plan to catch the gain over the next 18 months before it completes bacause I am buying at a discount'

My guarded response : 'You may be buying at a discount to future prices if they go up -that is correct.'

Client : ' Good, put me on the list to call when you release the next batch .

This is the sort of inane idiot I get almost every day. What I really find disturbing is the fact that there are a lot of people with a lot of money who are just plain thick. I am not selling rubbish in a rough area but prime site property at close to 1,000 quid a square foot.

So was I surprised to read in the paper today that many who leave University ( even some studying English Literature) can not string a sentance together or punctuate ?

So the smattering of spelling and punctuation errors are surely typos in your case <_<

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Does anyone here think that Britain is going to find it easy to compete with China in the years to come? Who is going to have a better living standard in the decades to come? I think the "global leveling" will hit a lot sooner than some here think.

My opinion on this is that the more we focus on service industries the quicker the levelling will occur. Most information based skills can be learnt for very little money from the net or from a book.

To set up in manufacturing requires lots of start up capital and could take years, whereas to start, say, a software company requires almost no money and you could be up and running instantly.

Edited by TimG

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You can see these playing cards in detail here. Some of them are quite entertaining; for example, the Ace of Clubs has a group of women sitting around a table complaining to each other about their new-found poverty; it's accompanied by the caption

Ladies, whose Husbands are undone by Bubble,

Meet at a Tavern to Lament their Trouble;

At length, they all agree upon Petitions,

To Pray the state to Mend their Bad Conditions.

I suspect that we'll be able to use this one unchanged in a few years.

These come from a website at the Harvard Business School: it's got lots of interesting stuff about the "extraordinary similarities between the South Sea Bubble of 1720 and the recent technology bubble". There's a lot of historical material, and much of it sounds strangely familiar...

Thats what I find really interesting about them. It might have happened a few hundred years ago, but you could apply some of the captions directly into the 21st Century & it would still strike a chord.

I guess that technology, etc might change, but we as people are exactly the same as we have always been.

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Guest Cletus VanDamme

My opinion on this is that the more we focus on service industries the quicker the levelling will occur. Most information based skills can be learnt for very little money from the net or from a book.

To set up in manufacturing requires lots of start up capital and could take years, whereas to start, say, a software company requires almost no money and you could be up and running instantly.

If you set up a software company on the basis of having read a book or downloading info from the net you wouldn't last long in business believe me!

Agree that start-up costs are lower. But experience and intuition regarding how to implement a solution to a client's problems can't be gained from Learn Java in 24 hours or such-like.

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Here's another anecdote about education...

My gf is from Hongkong. She was educted in the UK (Oxford), and thinks that this is a fine country to gain an education. She organised a spot for her nephew at Pangbourne. Her nephew was tehre almost two years, and graduated last year at the top of his class. When he failed to get into Oxford or Cambridge (too much competition, despite his standing at P.) he decided not to continue his education here.

His comment: "The British boys are not serious. All they are interested in is drinking and chasing girls. They are constantly making trouble, and are not interested in learning."

Does anyone here think that Britain is going to find it easy to compete with China in the years to come? Who is going to have a better living standard in the decades to come? I think the "global leveling" will hit a lot sooner than some here think.

I watched an excellent documentary last week on how the New Orleans Mardi Gras beads are made. They are all made at one factory in China where the average age is 15. These kids were working 14 hours per day and saving all their money (few dollars per day) so they either send it back their families for food or spend it their education.

A group of young girls had pooled their money together so they could buy English learning cassettes and a cheap cassette player.

These kids are going to be our competition.

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"These kids are going to be our competition"

How, how, how?

Are our beer-swilling, shaggy-minded lads and laddettes going to compete with an educated and motivated work force in China?

Our best hope is that they decide to convert England into a theme park, and offer the Chavs jobs as actor playing themselves. The whole of the southeast can become a gigantic set of East Enders, a real-life version of the TV series

The problem is the actors will want too much money and too many holidays.

The young Chinese workers were told the beads are thrown at drunken women if they show their breasts. They were totally miffed at why the beads where thrown away for nothing - and - totally amazed why American women would show their breasts for such rubbish.

A workers comment: "Why are the Americans so wasteful?"

A good question coming from a 15 year old Chinese peasant...

Edited by Pluto

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The problem is the actors will want too much money and too many holidays.

The young Chinese workers were told the beads are thrown at drunken women if they show their breasts. They were totally miffed at why the beads where thrown away for nothing - and - totally amazed why American women would show their breasts for such rubbish.

A workers comment: "Why are the Americans so wasteful?"

A good question coming from a 15 year old Chinese peasant...

Don't quite understand the analogy, are the beads dollars?

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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