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Libertine

Hello John, Got A New Motor ?

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Just had an interesting chat with a guy who owns a small repairs garage. They’re a general repairs/service/pre-MOT type outfit and he’s been in the game for 36 years. He was telling me how they’re having real problems getting motors through MOT tests and how, in his opinion, it all started since the introduction of a new testing regime (which he led me to believe started some time last year). Since then, he is getting loads of unexpected MOT failures on motors he is sending for tests.

He has gone as far as trying numerous different test centres and is even considering withdrawing his £20 pre-MOT check (because he keeps having to refund people when their motors fail really badly!!). He honestly seemed genuinely concerned about it and mentioned losing trade if he gets a reputation as a “picky” garage or one that “makes work”. His contacts at the local test centres have said that they are under real pressure from their authorities and threats of license withdrawal are common.

Interestingly, the unexpected failures seem to be motors that are >5 years old and which pulled up on numerous small faults. In his opinion, the cars aren’t dangerous but the build up of minor repairs means that the costs to get them through the test become prohibitive. Increasingly he is quoting repair prices that exceed the value of the car.

Now I’m all for making sure the cars on our roads are safe and put this point across. The garage-owning guy was adamant that many of the unexpected failures are “perfectly safe” cars but that the testing criteria has just gone “over the top”.

Also, he is being told (by the test centres) that repairs are not acceptable and that faulty parts must be entirely replaced. One example he gave was of an “immaculate” 8-year old Fiesta that was failed because the rear seat belts had become slightly stiff (the owners had no kids and didn’t use the rear seats!!). The test centre would not accept that a squirt of oil would fix it and insisted on new rear seatbelts. The repair cost was way out of line with the value of the car and it ended up going to the scrappers.

His take on it is that the test-centres are effectively (and unwittingly) forcing older motors off the road, not because they’re unsafe but because it encourages the owners to invest in a new one. This type of program is law in some places (Singapore, for example) but is it being operated here by stealth ?? Is this another form of increasing consumer manipulation……or am I just reading too much into it ??

<Lib>

ps, I don’t have any involvement in the industry – I’m just offering the thoughts of someone who has loads.

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Just another way goverment keeps you spending and paying tax on what you earn to spend in the first place.

Revolt is the only way forwards

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My ancient and extremely ratty MR2 got through its last MOT 9 months ago with no faults, even though it has a jagged bit pointing out of its rusty rear wing and a gash in the sidewall of one tyre (not through to the cords). I was amazed :). Since then the exhaust has fallen off and I can't afford to fix it :rolleyes:.

Anyway, according to MSE local councils have to run their own testing stations for their works vehicles etc. and legally they have to take private bookings too (or something like that). Since they don't offer repair services they have no incentive to fail cars that might be a bit borderline on minor issues.

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I was talking to an Rac relay guy last year, who told me that the car air bags were a big concern as a 'financial write off cause' as they need replacing every 8-10 years & cost £1500.

People driving around in cars older than 8-10 yrs with airbags may find that their insurance co. will not pay up on a claim.

I don't know how Mot's deal with Air-bags, as I've never had a car new enough to have one. Just thought this was relevant on the subject of cars becoming too expensive to repair.

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I was talking to an Rac relay guy last year, who told me that the car air bags were a big concern as a 'financial write off cause' as they need replacing every 8-10 years & cost £1500.

People driving around in cars older than 8-10 yrs with airbags may find that their insurance co. will not pay up on a claim.

I don't know how Mot's deal with Air-bags, as I've never had a car new enough to have one. Just thought this was relevant on the subject of cars becoming too expensive to repair.

Most manufacturers have revised the expected lifespan of airbags up from 10 to 15 years of late. This applies retrospectively to existing vehicles too, not just new ones, so the dire warnings of airbags needing replacing on older vehicles can be ignored for a few more years yet.

At present the MOT test completely ignores airbags, but I expect this could change at some point in the near-ish future.

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Just had an interesting chat with a guy who owns a small repairs garage. They’re a general repairs/service/pre-MOT type outfit and he’s been in the game for 36 years. He was telling me how they’re having real problems getting motors through MOT tests and how, in his opinion, it all started since the introduction of a new testing regime (which he led me to believe started some time last year). Since then, he is getting loads of unexpected MOT failures on motors he is sending for tests.

He has gone as far as trying numerous different test centres and is even considering withdrawing his £20 pre-MOT check (because he keeps having to refund people when their motors fail really badly!!). He honestly seemed genuinely concerned about it and mentioned losing trade if he gets a reputation as a “picky” garage or one that “makes work”. His contacts at the local test centres have said that they are under real pressure from their authorities and threats of license withdrawal are common.

Interestingly, the unexpected failures seem to be motors that are >5 years old and which pulled up on numerous small faults. In his opinion, the cars aren’t dangerous but the build up of minor repairs means that the costs to get them through the test become prohibitive. Increasingly he is quoting repair prices that exceed the value of the car.

Now I’m all for making sure the cars on our roads are safe and put this point across. The garage-owning guy was adamant that many of the unexpected failures are “perfectly safe” cars but that the testing criteria has just gone “over the top”.

Also, he is being told (by the test centres) that repairs are not acceptable and that faulty parts must be entirely replaced. One example he gave was of an “immaculate” 8-year old Fiesta that was failed because the rear seat belts had become slightly stiff (the owners had no kids and didn’t use the rear seats!!). The test centre would not accept that a squirt of oil would fix it and insisted on new rear seatbelts. The repair cost was way out of line with the value of the car and it ended up going to the scrappers.

His take on it is that the test-centres are effectively (and unwittingly) forcing older motors off the road, not because they’re unsafe but because it encourages the owners to invest in a new one. This type of program is law in some places (Singapore, for example) but is it being operated here by stealth ?? Is this another form of increasing consumer manipulation……or am I just reading too much into it ??

<Lib>

ps, I don’t have any involvement in the industry – I’m just offering the thoughts of someone who has loads.

I think I'm qualified to comment on this subject, I used to be an MOT tester.

The MOT test sets the minimum standard for safety related components on the vehicle.

The biggest problem with the MOT system is the testers, they don't know how to do the test properly.

IMO 90% of MOT testers fail vehicles on faults that are actually NOT in the book.

The reason they do this is because most of them are thick as shit and cannot be bothered to check the book or fail things because their mate fails on the same thing.

Now you may think I'm being harsh here, well I'm speaking from experience. I was the MOT quality controller at a large main dealer, responsible for the paperwork, the standard of the other testers and answerable to the Ministry.

The computerisation of the test has not changed its standard or criteria. It has just stored all the pass/fail info on a national database, mainly to stop fraud.

Now, I'm not in the game anymore, I have to take the car to my mates garage for test. And guess what? yes, his lads can't do the test right either! I don't make a fuss cos he does the test for free and is a smashing bloke. I just get on and do the work to appease the tester.

My advice to you. If your car gets failed on something you disagree with, ask them to show it you in the book. If they refuse or can't find it written in the there as a black and white failure, then ask them for a VT17.

The VT17 has the power to scare the shit out of any testing station. It is an appeal form, which means the Ministry get involved, they don't want that, oh no!

If they are f**king stooooooopid which most of them are, they won't be competent enough at their job to know if they have made the right decision on your car and will back down and probably offer a discount. F**k that, get them to either not fail it on that item or go to the ministry with the VT17!

Don't let these tw@ts rip you off!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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