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scaramanga

Immigration And The Btl

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Emotive subject i know but im convinced that immigration is helping the btl market greatly certainly in my area there are hoards of foreign workers who although cant afford to buy houses are all needing to live somewhere and are taking up the slack in the rental market.hopefully the new immigration controls will make some difference to the flood of low skilled workers especially from the "new european" countries.the conservative party i feel will be more likely to try and stem the flow but hey we shall see.....

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especially from the "new european" countries.

Countries like Poland, Czech Rep., Hungary, Slovakia and so-called Baltic States were always an integral part of Europe as far as I'm concerned. They hugely contributed to what's called the European heritage.

So, we should rather call them the new EU countries.

If we assume that EU = Europe, then Norway and Switzerland are out of Europe.

:rolleyes:

Just kidding, but again it's a bit sad that people remember only the last 50 years of Europe's history..

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Emotive subject i know but im convinced that immigration is helping the btl market greatly certainly in my area there are hoards of foreign workers who although cant afford to buy houses are all needing to live somewhere and are taking up the slack in the rental market.hopefully the new immigration controls will make some difference to the flood of low skilled workers especially from the "new european" countries.the conservative party i feel will be more likely to try and stem the flow but hey we shall see.....

I am not sure these new rules can be applied to EU members from the Baltic States or wherever. Their entire populations have free access.

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yep kindof, i have a slovakian Girlfriend :) but they live very cheaply. Most houseshare, many share rooms, and they always look for the cheapest possible rent. Nahh its all good, there friendly people and there hardworkers (40 hours plus, some upto 100 hours a week). When the economy goes sour economic immagrants will be the first to leave, helping rents to drop...

Edited by moosetea

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I am not sure these new rules can be applied to EU members from the Baltic States or wherever. Their entire populations have free access.

That said, I should add, my experience of Czech and Baltic state workers over here has been pretty good and even if they stay I am fairly sure they will be integrated Britons by the second generation. I wish this was true for all immigrants.

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Emotive subject i know but im convinced that immigration is helping the btl market greatly certainly in my area there are hoards of foreign workers who although cant afford to buy houses are all needing to live somewhere and are taking up the slack in the rental market.hopefully the new immigration controls will make some difference to the flood of low skilled workers especially from the "new european" countries.the conservative party i feel will be more likely to try and stem the flow but hey we shall see.....

"hopefully the new immigration controls "

Pure talk/spin to keep the sheeple happy - It will never happen in my view.

However, aound Huddersfield some immigrants have taken a new tack to solve the housing shortage - They're shooting each other (and some of the local poulation) !

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...pic=2806&st=520

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Seems to be every second person on my street at times. Experience has been mixed; mainly quiet but some standing in the shop insulting the British-Pakistani shopkeeper for being Pakistani and some drunk on the street (both of which the locals already seemed to have a handle on).

I don't tend to mind immigration (or haven't so far) but I worry about these mass influxes and how it affects the existing populace in terms of employment and housing costs.

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I don't tend to mind immigration (or haven't so far) but I worry about these mass influxes and how it affects the existing populace in terms of employment and housing costs.

my feelings exactly.................

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"hopefully the new immigration controls"

And just when did goverment stick to the rules ?

it's bull$hit to keep joe public happy whilst they let cheap labour flood in

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And just when did goverment stick to the rules ?

it's bull$hit to keep joe public happy whilst they let cheap labour flood in

They are sitting on a political hot potato,people will and are beggining to to see immigration as a problem,not in a nationalistic, violent way. but if it is not dealt with properly and soon by either the labourgasted party or the torys hungry for office well i see serious problems ahead.....

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Immigration is of course fuelling BTL, and has no doubt been a significant factor in getting house prices to the levels they are today.

It simply amazes me that this government has allowed mass immigration to continue, when its quite clear the British public dont want these people here - they are a massive drain on our resources and health service, many have cultures which are simply not compatible with ours, yet still theyre allowed to flood in.

The system is totally wrong in the way that once you get into this country (legally or illegally) you are pretty much here to stay. You have access to almost unlimited legal aid, free healthcare, free housing - all at tax payers expense :angry:

Edited by Pete95

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Immigration is of course fuelling BTL, and has no doubt been a significant factor in getting house prices to the levels they are today.

Wage inflation has been kept in check mainly by immigration - without it wages would have risen, interest rates gone up and HPI contained to low single figures.

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The system is totally wrong in the way that once you get into this country (legally or illegally) you are pretty much here to stay. You have access to almost unlimited legal aid, free healthcare, free housing - all at tax payers expense :angry:

That simply underpins more public jobs. With 2.6m natives now on incapacity benefit not including the additional 1.5m unemployed it's pretty obvious our own people don't want to do these jobs. One answer of course would be to pay realistic wages, they should do this even for immigrants, however that would drive up inflation and interest rates... not nice if you're leveraged up to your eye balls.

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Seems to be every second person on my street at times. Experience has been mixed; mainly quiet but some standing in the shop insulting the British-Pakistani shopkeeper for being Pakistani and some drunk on the street (both of which the locals already seemed to have a handle on).

I don't tend to mind immigration (or haven't so far) but I worry about these mass influxes and how it affects the existing populace in terms of employment and housing costs.

I went into the local big W – east London way – I was served by a foreign woman who could not speak English clear enough for me to under stand – after asking her to repeat her self 3 times I gave up and looked at the till for the amount she wanted. Why would you employ someone like that in a shop – but when I looked at the other tills they were all the same – it was probably the first time she had to serve someone who did not speak her native tongue.

To much immigration to quick – the reason why – to boost the countries growth – I don’t think this country needs cheap labour but we would have been in a recession if the countries population had not been bloated – we will pay for this for years to come

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I went into the local big W – east London way – I was served by a foreign woman who could not speak English clear enough for me to under stand – after asking her to repeat her self 3 times I gave up and looked at the till for the amount she wanted. Why would you employ someone like that in a shop – but when I looked at the other tills they were all the same – it was probably the first time she had to serve someone who did not speak her native tongue.

To much immigration to quick – the reason why – to boost the countries growth – I don’t think this country needs cheap labour but we would have been in a recession if the countries population had not been bloated – we will pay for this for years to come

I know it's a complicated balancing act between having enough people so that there is a healthy economy that serves all while ensuring that overcrowding, crime and unproportional public spending increases don't happen. I'd like to see an honest debate amoung the parties or at least in the media about whose interests are best being served. And before any of you BNP apologists/shills pipe up this won't happen while the invidual immigrants are demonised. You just make it easy for PC tossers to shout down debate.

Edited by algor

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Wage inflation has been kept in check mainly by immigration - without it wages would have risen, interest rates gone up and HPI contained to low single figures.

Bolloxs. That is complete speculation from someone who probably cannot count past seven. Can you prove it?. Thought not - you are talking crap in a effort to push your pathetic BNP politics.

IF you had a braincell you would be dangerous

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Bolloxs. That is complete speculation from someone who probably cannot count past seven. Can you prove it?. Thought not - you are talking crap in a effort to push your pathetic BNP politics.

IF you had a braincell you would be dangerous

Wrong. It is patently obvious, you'd have to be totally detatched from large swathes of various sectors of employment to think otherwise.

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I tend to agree – I thought that minimum wage increases would have put massive pressure on it- although without the attitude

The minimum wage levels are not that difficult to get wround, besides - it is the min wage up to £10/£20 an hour rage that is potenitally a key target area.

Take agency lorry drivers for example - £7/£8 an hour anyone?

The proof is in the pudding, unemployment levels are rising.

http://www.tuc.org.uk/extras/Migrantworkerseurope.doc

5.4 Employer abuse

While it must be borne in mind that this report is not the result of a systematic survey of the new arrivals, it is clear that gaining legal status in the labour market does not remove all threat of abuse by employers. However, it is also clear that legalisation does give some workers the confidence to find out about their rights, complain and to seek remedy for problems. Others still remain fearful of causing trouble.

Problems with recruitment and temporary labour agencies abound. Some recruitment agencies charge workers in their home countries for finding them work (a practice which is unlawful in Britain). In some cases agencies are making “administrative” charges to workers, which may be lawful if authorised, but are certainly not god practice, particularly where they take the form of regular charges for paying workers by cheque. Experience with the gangmasters licensing scheme will need to be closely examined to establish whether this reduces the scale of abuse. A strong EU directive on Temporary Agency Work would also help to reduce the scope for discrimination against agency workers.

There have also been examples of hourly rates being lower than promised, or lower than those paid to British workers, and of non-payment for some hours worked. In some cases wages have been reported as withheld for months on end. Several cases of documents being withheld by employers, and this seems to be related to the need to provide passports to the Home Office as part of the registration process.

Excessive working hours have been reported, in some cases with no rest day being provided, or inadequate breaks between shifts. A frequent complaint is that no enhanced rates of pay are paid for overtime, which workers clearly feel is unfair (as do unions), but is not unlawful in most cases.

The differences in pay which have emerged are obviously of concern to unions, who are anxious to avoid a divide and rule strategy being used to depress wages. This puts them at odds with Bank of England Governor Mervyn King, who was quoted as saying that workers from the enlarged European Union were easing "the bottlenecks and skill shortages in what is undoubtedly a tight labour market", and could be "suppressing signs of underlying wage pressure". It is a challenge to unions to explain to new arrivals the prevailing rates of pay, good employment practice and their legal rights, and to organise these workers in order to defend themselves.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,,1433251,00.html

Then there are issues of worker exploitation. "Many Poles get taken on in casual work and the conditions are pretty dreadful," says Union of Construction, Allied Trade and Technicans spokesman Jonathan Green. "The big issue in the building trade is non-payment of wages, and some Polish builders fall prey to that."

Ucatt also points out that there have been cases where agencies have preferred to hire labour from Poland rather than indigenous workers, and that eastern European workers have been hired at rates below industry norms, at a time when construction companies are reluctant to take on new apprentices - all of which causes resentment.

Edited by OnlyMe

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The Government made a big mistake giving the new Eu members' people access to our labour market...the population of the accession states is 77 million... more than that of sweden , Ireland the uk combined....

In most of them the average salary is a fifth of the uk level and In Poland unemployment is 22%.......

The gap between us them was bound to cause a huge inflow of people and in my town pop 80000 more than a thousand are already here bolstering the BTL market.............

Rich countries remain rich because their labour markets are closed to people from poor countries..

Could you imagine the US (pop 280 million)opening its labour market to 100 million Mexicans?.....

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Intensified flows across national boundaries are pushing down wages in western economies - but primarily the flows doing it are of money, trade and knowledge. These will continue even if all flows of actual people were to be stopped. You could try and cut off the UK from the rest of the world economy - but only if you want to speed up terminal decline.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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