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CommonSense

Waiting Is Very Profitable.

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

A quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

Edited by CommonSense

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

An quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

very similar

interest on STR paying a 4 figure sum

no debts

no financial worries

no house maintenance (yipee!) :)

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

A quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

Profitable - No, not really, renting is expensive (down sarf at least), but less costly than buying, by a country mile!

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

A quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

I bought last year

I have debt - manageable as long as interest rates dont go up by more than 2 or 3 % in the next 3 years

I'm getting richer each week because house prices have not fallen yet :-) and I am paying off my debt fast

I have my own home and plan to pay off the mortgage within 8 years at current interest rates

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very similar

interest on STR paying a 4 figure sum

no debts

no financial worries

no house maintenance (yipee!) :)

Same here- though only just a 4 figure sum (per year).

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very similar

interest on STR paying a 4 figure sum

no debts

no financial worries

no house maintenance (yipee!) :)

What a revolutionary concept, this spending less than you earn thing is!

So many people miss the obvious.

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Doing nicely too - bought Oct 98, sold Oct 2005. Perfick. Now renting.

Which way would people like to check how 'rich' they are?

a: By believing politicians and EAs

b: By logging onto ING Direct and checking the latest balance, after daily compounded interest (soon to go up)

I prefer... b.

Anyone disagree?

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

A quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

I guess you forgot to include missed opportunities in your calculations?

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I bought last year

I have debt - manageable as long as interest rates dont go up by more than 2 or 3 % in the next 3 years

I'm getting richer each week because house prices have not fallen yet :-) and I am paying off my debt fast

I have my own home and plan to pay off the mortgage within 8 years at current interest rates

You don't seem to have bitten off more than you can chew so good luck to you. I don't deride you for buying as you seem to understand the following mathematical concept:

Contentment = Not spending your money on useless things you don't need.

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well im not 100% happy with it. id rather some fairness in the uk housing market so i could just 'get on with it'.

BUT !!

my annual rent is around 5k. current house deflation here is about 10-20k a year, so im saving £15k in bogus inflation each year. as soon as this imbalance stops - thats the time to buy. about 3 years maybe.

im dug in deep. im not going to commit financial suicide.

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Well I have done it the other way round. Bought and then sold but am seriously considering pulling out of the sale and renting it out and waiting for prices to continue up as they have moved up since we agreed our sale.

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I guess you forgot to include missed opportunities in your calculations?

Everyone misses opportunities, be they financial or otherwise. It not something I would ever dwell upon. The only time missed opportunities seem to enter my mind is when others remind me for the purpose of making themselves feel better, it's such a sad and pitiful way of thinking in my opinion and it bothers me not one little bit. It's merely an extension of the playground bully principle who only becomes the bully because he couldn't handle the pressure when it happened to him. I hope you get over it quite soon.

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Everyone misses opportunities, be they financial or otherwise. It not something I would ever dwell upon. The only time missed opportunities seem to enter my mind is when others remind me for the purpose of making themselves feel better, it's such a sad and pitiful way of thinking in my opinion and it bothers me not one little bit. It's merely an extension of the playground bully principle who only becomes the bully because he couldn't handle the pressure when it happened to him. I hope you get over it quite soon.

Agree absolutely with you, ComonSense!

I was 17/18 in 1995 and the thought that somehow it was my fault that i wilfully "missed" the time to buy riles me greatly. How could I know, or afford, at 18, to capitalise on the housing market? And yet somehow I ended up "missing the boat", as bullies gleefully put it, which will impact greatly on me in the form of financial and life stability, having children, settling down - all things that by rights we want young adults to DO to maintain economic stability - and somehow it's all my fault that I didn't buy in the nineties, even though I couldn't have afforded it at the time? I can't help that missed opportunity. But somehow people keep wanting pointlessly to remind me of it. Why? It's not very gracious or charming to gloat at others' expense, particularly when you might be relying on them to pay to keep your pension plan going in the future....

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Agree absolutely with you, ComonSense!

I was 17/18 in 1995 and the thought that somehow it was my fault that i wilfully "missed" the time to buy riles me greatly. How could I know, or afford, at 18, to capitalise on the housing market? And yet somehow I ended up "missing the boat", as bullies gleefully put it, which will impact greatly on me in the form of financial and life stability, having children, settling down - all things that by rights we want young adults to DO to maintain economic stability - and somehow it's all my fault that I didn't buy in the nineties, even though I couldn't have afforded it at the time? I can't help that missed opportunity. But somehow people keep wanting pointlessly to remind me of it. Why? It's not very gracious or charming to gloat at others' expense, particularly when you might be relying on them to pay to keep your pension plan going in the future....

Firstly, if you could not afford to buy a house back then, then it's not your fault.

I don't own.

I have a young family.

I'm a happy chappie.

Have I failed my family for not providing a home which we 'own' ... course not.

It's not our albatross to wear.

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I guess you forgot to include missed opportunities in your calculations?

Hi TTRTR,

Surely 'missed opportunites' don't mean much to the banks if things were to tighten up on credit.

i.e. Yes I used to have a 3 million portfolio with 1 mil equity but now its worth 2 mil and my equity is wiped out never seems to cut it with banks and investment companies... yes the property value could have risen, but maybe it won't.

It's like those idiots who include expected capital gains as part of their BTL yield calucations.

Money in the bank... making itself from other money in the bank is a nice way to be... it just sits their and gives you a warm feeling when you check the balance. The only real risk to cash is devaluation of sterling.

If IR's were at 10% I bet you'd liquidate you holdings and invest in other positions...

- Pye (Property Speculation Ninja :ph34r: )

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We're always hearing from the VIs about how much money people have made in the last decade, or whatever. Can someone calculate how much people have saved, on average, by NOT buying a house in June 2004 (the peak)?

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STR fund now fully invested in non-property assets (with small exposure to commercial property). Initial gains since July 04 have easily beaten property and I expect this outperformance to continue.

Investors with 400% residential property, -300% cash make me laugh.

(oh yes, and renting a farmhouse for half my old morgage, all covered by dividend income)

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nobody cares what you 'mean' because your opinion is about as valuable as a 200 ton statue of a dead dog.

Half day today? no lessons?

Edited by Given Up

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Haven't been here for a while, so hello again.

A quick update,

I've still not purchased a home.

I still have no debt.

I'm still getting richer by the week.

Waiting is very easy.

Waiting is very profitable.

Anyone else similar?

Yeah, I didn't buy a home and I'm already £5k richer! You can only make money down this route as your savings only ever go up! It's amazing to have this sort of security by not being a homeowner :lol:

Edited by BuyingBear

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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