Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
delboypass

Planning Permission For New Build

Recommended Posts

does anyone have any further information about applying for planning permission for a new build on woodland or arable land??

I could own 8 acres of woodland or 6 acres of arable land.

I spoke to the most helpful planning office this morning of Aberdeenshire and although they recognise the need for affordable housing it is against their policy to allow a new build on green land. I stated that only a tiny precentage of aberdeenshire is actually built on, im a FTB with no house and cant afford these over inflated houses.

He says they are working on a new affordable housing policy but also have to respect the green belt policy (which is a load of sheete!)

Can anyone help me out here with how I could get planning permission for a new build house on any of these sites.

The arable land is looking more likely as i could build a house (ie farmers house to tend the land/livestock etc) - ill buy a couple of sheep and once house complete, make myself a couple of pies!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does anyone have any further information about applying for planning permission for a new build on woodland or arable land??

I could own 8 acres of woodland or 6 acres of arable land.

I spoke to the most helpful planning office this morning of Aberdeenshire and although they recognise the need for affordable housing it is against their policy to allow a new build on green land. I stated that only a tiny precentage of aberdeenshire is actually built on, im a FTB with no house and cant afford these over inflated houses.

He says they are working on a new affordable housing policy but also have to respect the green belt policy (which is a load of sheete!)

Can anyone help me out here with how I could get planning permission for a new build house on any of these sites.

The arable land is looking more likely as i could build a house (ie farmers house to tend the land/livestock etc) - ill buy a couple of sheep and once house complete, make myself a couple of pies!

I was informed by a builder that current loophole is to apply to build farm buildings, stables etc etc, build them at a high quality and in 5 to 10 years time apply for permission to convert them to housing. He has built fully insulated stables with windows.....

Edited by moosetea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is what i dont get - how can farmers aplly to get stable and out house conversions done??

Surely this goes against green belt planning permission ??

Does he then live on the stable for 5 years?? Or am i expect to let it rot for 5 years or put sheep into a 2 up 2 down ;-)) I can see them squabbling over the rooms now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is what i dont get - how can farmers aplly to get stable and out house conversions done??

Surely this goes against green belt planning permission ??

Does he then live on the stable for 5 years?? Or am i expect to let it rot for 5 years or put sheep into a 2 up 2 down ;-)) I can see them squabbling over the rooms now!

The green belt is for things like farming; and stables and buildings are part of farming, so farmers need to be able to erect buildings, etc.,

Peter,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The green belt is for things like farming; and stables and buildings are part of farming, so farmers need to be able to erect buildings, etc.,

Peter,

There putting horses in it for 5 years.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When i spoke to them, they said i could have a building in the woodland only for woodland purposes - ie looking after them

Or

on the arable land, dwellings for a farmer or person to tend the land etc.

(how many horses can i get on 6 acres??)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He says they are working on a new affordable housing policy but also have to respect the green belt policy (which is a load of sheete!)

Can anyone help me out here with how I could get planning permission for a new build house on any of these sites.

You need to get it included in the UDP, then you will be able to build in 2099 or something. Thanks to nutty pressure groups they have a policy of selecting brownfield land, even in areas with very little historical land usage for industry. Brownfield first is now brownfield only in many cases, otherwise it's nothing is built.

You basically have two options, 1. hire the services of a pikey, or 2. build an outstanding house under the Gummer Law. Another option is to just stand there and try and work out how we live in an "highly urbanised country". Farm related buildings didn't need permission until recently, so you could build something and try and get permission for change of use.

Edited by BuyingBear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When i spoke to them, they said i could have a building in the woodland only for woodland purposes - ie looking after them

Or

on the arable land, dwellings for a farmer or person to tend the land etc.

(how many horses can i get on 6 acres??)

Look for the Grand Designs of Ben Law's (I think that's his name) woodland house.

He got planning permission for a house in his woodland.

he lives there to tend charcoal making overnight.

There is no tax paid on income form woodland I think - worth double checking though

Edited by SarahBell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look for the Grand Designs of Ben Law's (I think that's his name) woodland house.

He got planning permission for a house in his woodland.

he lives there to tend charcoal making overnight.

That's good, a guy in Shropshire just bought a herd of Alpacas. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Alpacas are really cool looking animals!!

Some dude in aberdeenshire has made an Emu farm!!

Unfortunately it snowed 3-4 ft last week !! Dont know how much Emus like snow!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aberdeenshire has a local plan and structure plan (collectively known as the development plan). They both have a map and a set of policies. If they are not online then go the library or the planning authority office and have a look at the area you're interested in – the local plan has much more detail.

If the land's in the greenbelt then your chances of changing use to residential from agriculture are very small. If there are any farm buildings on the land you chances are better. In addition to the greenbelt there may be other designations eg landscape, nature conservation. There may also be legally protected species eg bats, badgers.

Housing developers with time and money would put representations in the next draft of the development plan in an attempt to get it allocated for housing. This is typically for sites adjacent to existing settlements where they can argue that it is a natural extension of that settlement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Alpacas are really cool looking animals!!

Some dude in aberdeenshire has made an Emu farm!!

Unfortunately it snowed 3-4 ft last week !! Dont know how much Emus like snow!!

Emus can actually handle the cold, they are semi-desert creatures and deserts get cold at night. There are some wild ones in a national park near where I live, and we regularly get winter minimum night temperatures down to -6 or -7 Celsius (but these cold nights are always followed by bright sunny days B).

I don't think they would be too keen on snow though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look for the Grand Designs of Ben Law's (I think that's his name) woodland house.

He got planning permission for a house in his woodland.

he lives there to tend charcoal making overnight.

There is no tax paid on income form woodland I think - worth double checking though

I met Ben and know the house but it's not your average situation. The permission he got is incredibly restrictive. He's not allowed to sell it and when he no longer needs to live there it has to be pulled down. It's totally linked to the charcoal making business he has set up there. Although it's a fantastic house, beautifully built, it's really no more than a tent in terms of its permanency. Shocking really because it's a stunning achievement. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I met Ben and know the house but it's not your average situation. The permission he got is incredibly restrictive. He's not allowed to sell it and when he no longer needs to live there it has to be pulled down. It's totally linked to the charcoal making business he has set up there. Although it's a fantastic house, beautifully built, it's really no more than a tent in terms of its permanency. Shocking really because it's a stunning achievement. :)

Wow! *envy*

Yes I know it was very restrictive - he can't sell it - but we're talking about a home not an investment.

If you could make a living from a piece of land and not need to be ongrid then that must feel pretty good - to be doing it by choice.

http://www.woodlands.co.uk/faq.php?faqTopi...r%20woodland#q1

I guess this does say a pre-existing job not a new one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! *envy*

Yes I know it was very restrictive - he can't sell it - but we're talking about a home not an investment.

When he built it his life was very much in the woods. He has a partner and child now which I guess could be potentially more complicated but really, I can't see why anyone would want to leave that location other than in a (eco) coffin! It's just great that people are willing to invest in their homes purely for the sake of having somewhere lovely to live rather than as a way of making easy money for doing bugger all. He's an inspriation in many ways :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

90% of our ''crowded'' country is undeveloped .......would it really hurt to cut this to 87.5% by increasing the developed bit from 10% to 12.5%........................Even building homes for 15 million people would only involve this kind of increase........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There’s a location near me I know of where 15 applicants all tried and failed to get residential planning permission for this one plot because it was green belt.

Then last year a huge bungalow sprung up on it. Everything became very clear when I checked the planning committee minutes online and learned it was an agricultural workers dwelling. A family of six live there, they have a small sty out the back with four pigs in it.

Hat’s off to them. For that is how money is made investing in property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the land is yours then you could build a low impact dwelling (LID) as a fait acompli. Depending on the type of dwelling you build and the attitude of the local council it could be some time before any enforcement action is taken.

Look at the round house saga at Brithdirmawr.

A typical LID can be built very cheaply using local recycled material but you do have to be a certain type of person to want to do it.

link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

take over some woodland with a 12 bore and draw the local authorities and police into a long armed seige.

use whats at hand to form a natural barricade. logs, branches etc. then live off the woodland for up to 6 months, while using a dial up modem and laptop to broadcast your plight on the web. you can also form aa crude toilet and shwer from natural objects such as a log with woodworm holes in for a shower head and say a large rock with a windblown hole in it for a toilet seat etc. an additional toilet roll holder could be made by binding together one 12in stick to 2x 5in sticks with common twine.

you could also email look east with daily news snippets and images before the weather report. by powergen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

take over some woodland with a 12 bore and draw the local authorities and police into a long armed seige.

use whats at hand to form a natural barricade. logs, branches etc. then live off the woodland for up to 6 months, while using a dial up modem and laptop to broadcast your plight on the web. you can also form aa crude toilet and shwer from natural objects such as a log with woodworm holes in for a shower head and say a large rock with a windblown hole in it for a toilet seat etc. an additional toilet roll holder could be made by binding together one 12in stick to 2x 5in sticks with common twine.

you could also email look east with daily news snippets and images before the weather report. by powergen.

The UK's answer to "Ruby Ridge" eh Fred?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you buy woodland, can they really impose how you use hte land on you.

One woodland comes with restrications like, Cannot go clay pigeon shooting in your own land because of noise, etc.

Surely its your land and its up to you what you do.

IE I was going to go paintballing there every weekend. Bugger hte neighbours! they can play if they want

Called a covenant

No shooting in case neighbours find it noisy

No micheal carroll (racing) with automobiles

No camping

No clay pigeons

no business except forestry

use the land in a way which will affect the access.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you buy woodland, can they really impose how you use hte land on you.

One woodland comes with restrications like, Cannot go clay pigeon shooting in your own land because of noise, etc.

Surely its your land and its up to you what you do.

IE I was going to go paintballing there every weekend. Bugger hte neighbours! they can play if they want

Called a covenant

No shooting in case neighbours find it noisy

No micheal carroll (racing) with automobiles

No camping

No clay pigeons

no business except forestry

use the land in a way which will affect the access.

They can only impose the covenants on you if you agree to them in the first place. If you don't like what they propose don't buy or negotiate covenants you are happy with. BTW "normal" property can have restrictive covenants usually against industrial uses in residential areas etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does anyone have any further information about applying for planning permission for a new build on woodland or arable land??

I could own 8 acres of woodland or 6 acres of arable land.

I spoke to the most helpful planning office this morning of Aberdeenshire and although they recognise the need for affordable housing it is against their policy to allow a new build on green land. I stated that only a tiny precentage of aberdeenshire is actually built on, im a FTB with no house and cant afford these over inflated houses.

He says they are working on a new affordable housing policy but also have to respect the green belt policy (which is a load of sheete!)

Can anyone help me out here with how I could get planning permission for a new build house on any of these sites.

The arable land is looking more likely as i could build a house (ie farmers house to tend the land/livestock etc) - ill buy a couple of sheep and once house complete, make myself a couple of pies!

There are a number of things you could try.

If 51% or more of your income is made from your land AND you need to be on site for a good reason, tend to livestock etc, then you may have a chance.

If you get planning in this way you will pay a reduced rate of CT. Your house will have an agricultural tie, which means it can only be lived in or sold to only agricultural workers. The tie can be removed but I think 10 years must pass.

You need to have been living on your land for a continuous period of over 10 years(without enforcement) to be granted change of use from agricultural to residential. You can then apply for a certificate of lawful development which means that whatever you have built can stay. If you wanted to build a permanent house then you would have to reapply. Most CLD's are granted for shacks and caravans.

You can get change of use on an existing building (barn/stable) after continuous residency of four years(without enforcement), you will then be granted a CLD.

Lots of us have done it. I can tell you from experience that it is well worth all the effort and mud.

P.S

If you're thinking of building your dream home in open countryside, dream on.

Edited by dom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.