Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
undersupply

No More Ftb's

Recommended Posts

Why have the VI's started highlighting affordability for FTB's? Are they angling for govenment support to keep the market afloat?

Interesting point re rents, have they really gone up? Don't see much sign of that myself.

Also it says that youngest pay highest rents, why is this? My guess is that a larger number of renters over 35 are low earners who could not buy pre boom and can't afford higher rents. Young people can't afford to buy but can afford to pay higher rents for better properties.

Edited by Young Goat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why have the VI's started highlighting affordability for FTB's? Are they angling for govenment support to keep the market afloat?

Interesting point re rents, have they really gone up? Don't see much sign of that myself.

Also it says that youngest pay highest rents, why is this? My guess is that a larger number of renters over 35 are low earners who could not buy pre boom and can't afford higher rents. Young people can't afford to buy but can afford to pay higher rents for better properties.

older renters may still be on long-term tenancy agreements with protected rent levels and tenancy terms that aren't available to younger people (such as an assured tenancy or a protected tenancy rather than an assured shorthold tenancy). young people don't have a choice but to pay market rate if they have to rent.

ie see:

-----------

The tenancy began before 15 January 1989

If your tenancy began before 15 January 1989 you could be either:-

a protected tenant (see below); or

an occupier with basic protection (see below).

Protected tenants

If you are a protected tenant you will:-

be paying rent for the accommodation; and

not normally have a resident landlord; and

not be provided with food or services by your landlord.

You will not be a protected tenant if your accommodation is:-

a bed and breakfast letting

a ‘company’ let.

Protected tenants have the strongest rights of any private tenants. If you think you are a protected tenant and your landlord asks you to move or to sign a new agreement, you should consult an experienced adviser, for example, at a Citizens Advice Bureau. To search for details of your nearest CAB, including those that can give advice by e-mail, click on nearest CAB.

Rights of protected tenants

As a protected tenant you have the following rights:-

security of tenure. Your landlord can only repossess the accommodation in certain specified circumstances - see under heading The right to stay in the accommodation

the right to have the rent fixed by the rent officer - see below

the right to have rent increased only in certain circumstances - see under heading Fixing and increasing the rent

the right to have the accommodation kept in a reasonable state or repair - see under heading Repairs

the right of your spouse, civil partner, other partner or another family member to take over the tenancy on your death.

Edited by Zaranna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Labour government who have managed to alienate and disadvantage the new young professional generation so much they can't afford to even think of buying.

I have friends with well over 30-40K uni debts in their mid-twenties... they can't even think about buying until early/mid thirties. They probably won't even start a family until late thirties/early forties at this rate.

Well to NuLab... welcome to the future...

- Pye (Property Speculation Ninja :ph34r: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.