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University Costs Impeding First-time Buyers

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If it is not one thing it is another. The NAEA/RICS are going to have to piddle in the wind for future FTB's in any great number, even if prices fall a lot.

£50k shortfall to clear exiting debt and get deposit together (or borrow that as well).

http://www.myfinances.co.uk/property/housi...36;17056872.htm

University costs impeding first-time buyers

The ever-rising cost of university is making it even harder for graduates to get onto the property ladder.

After a day of bad news for first-time buyers, with Nationwide and Rics highlighting their woes, new research shows that graduates could face a significant disadvantage when trying to get their first foot on the property ladder.

Newcastle Building Society points out that from September 2006 universities in England and Northern Ireland can charge tuition fees of up to £3,000 a year, representing a 155 per cent increase what is paid currently.

When added to other costs, this year’s freshers are set to rack up some £30,105 in debt, National Union of Students figures show.

This will mean graduate debt will eclipse the average deposit for a first-time buyer home - now at £23,067.

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Guest Winners and Losers

If it is not one thing it is another. The NAEA/RICS are going to have to piddle in the wind for future FTB's in any great number, even if prices fall a lot.

£50k shortfall to clear exiting debt and get deposit together (or borrow that as well).

http://www.myfinances.co.uk/property/housi...36;17056872.htm

University costs impeding first-time buyers

The ever-rising cost of university is making it even harder for graduates to get onto the property ladder.

After a day of bad news for first-time buyers, with Nationwide and Rics highlighting their woes, new research shows that graduates could face a significant disadvantage when trying to get their first foot on the property ladder.

Newcastle Building Society points out that from September 2006 universities in England and Northern Ireland can charge tuition fees of up to £3,000 a year, representing a 155 per cent increase what is paid currently.

When added to other costs, this year’s freshers are set to rack up some £30,105 in debt, National Union of Students figures show.

This will mean graduate debt will eclipse the average deposit for a first-time buyer home - now at £23,067.

Yep, my 'cabbie' referred to this as well in his recession forecasts. No graph available I'm afraid - illegal to create graphs whilst driving.

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This IS a big factor. But it's amazing how 'they' seem to find anything to blame but the massive elephant in the living room that is the actual PRICE of a house!

Separate subject - Aaah, poor Tessa and her dodgy husband...aaaahh. She's one of us / a woman of the people.

Labour Sleaze - again.

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Yep,

number of years ago I graduated = 5

number of friends from university I know who have bought houses = 0

years to pay off student debt = 4

size of student loan = 5

some people will still be paying this debt in their 30's

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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