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Killer Bunny

Bbc Responds

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My complaint first - some of you may remember it.

DAY 28 - who's up for the public vote - you decide! as it were...

COMPLAINT B)

{Date:} 28/01/2006

{CommentType:} Complaint

{Channel:} BBC One

{ProgrammeName:} Weekend 24

{TransmissionDate:} 28/01/06

{Comments:}

Weekend 24: On your first time buyers piece this morning you -

astoundingly - asked an estate agent about the state of the market. Like

he's going to say anything other than the market is strong -

particularly when it is the weakest its been for a decade.

Then you called the 'property woman' independent - and its very clear

from what she said she has every bit a vested interest in talking the

housing market up as the agent.

Why oh why BBC News will you not have true impartial people commenting

on the housing market when you do such pieces.

I am Chartered Financial Planner and I have no vested interest in

talking up or down the market. I am an independent and impartial

financial adviser who cares about my clients and that the true message

gets out. The housing market is dying. You and others are continuing to

perpetuate the myth that it is a good time to buy property - IT IS NOT!

It is a terrible time to buy residential (or commercial) property.

Values will fall over the next 4 - 6 years. Then where will the 'rent is

dead money' nonsense be?

In a rising market rent is dead money. But the market, in the south east,

has not risen for well over a year and the north will follow. The south

will fall by 30 - 50% over the next 5 years or so. It never ceases to

amaze me that people will happily accept the asset class (housing)

can rise 200% in a decade but that to suggest it can (and will) fall

30-50% over 5 years - people look at you as if you're the Devil or from

outer space. The fact is I charge for my expertise and my clients are

selling their buy-to-lets and certainly not trading up or buying first

time.

My clients will bring their retirement forward at least 5 years.

BBC - get someone on to talk about housing who a) knows the

economics behind the market and B) has no vested interest.

What you did today and so so many times before is public dis-service

broadcasting.

{EndofComments:}

OFFICIAL RESPONSE:

-----Original Message-----

From: info@bbc.co.uk [mailto:info@bbc.co.uk]

Sent: 28 February 2006 16:31

To:

Subject: 12551474 BBC News

Dear Mr

Thank you for your e-mail regarding BBC News 24. May I start by

apologising for the delay in replying. We know our correspondents expect a

swift response and I am sorry that you have had to wait so long on this

occasion.

I note you were concerned by our reports relating to the housing market

that morning. It was something both 'Weekend 24' and 'Breakfast' covered

on 28 January and I can assure you neither had any intention to "talk up

the market".

'Breakfast' offered a straightforward news report on the number of first

time buyers in the property market. It was pointed out that this is

thought to have dropped to its lowest level for twenty five years and that

they appear to be having to save harder and for longer in order to get onto

the housing ladder.

In addition there was a discussion with a first time buyer in a shared

ownership scheme - and a mortgage advisor. This was quite specific about

how difficult it can be for first time buyers to get into the housing

market. It also looked at some of the alternatives available such as

shared ownership with housing association.

Within the confines of this type of report and a short discussion piece it

was simply not possible to explore the pros and cons of a home ownership

culture in depth which seems to be where your concerns lie.

Similarly during 'Weekend 24' there was a comprehensive introduction to the

issue which suggested that the market isn't considered strong by many and

reiterated the points about the number of first time buyers being at its

lowest for 25 years. They also mentioned the difficulty for many of having

to raise large deposits for instance.

The view expressed by Joanna Hayden Knowell later that it is still better

to buy than to rent was her own view, rather than that of the BBC, and no

doubt viewers can make up their own minds on the subject.

However, I am sorry if you were concerned by the reporting that morning and

can assure you that your comments have been registered and added to our

daily log which is made available to programme makers and senior editorial

staff.

Thank you again for contacting the BBC.

Yours sincerely

Stewart McCullough

Divisional Advisor

BBC Information

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Within the confines of this type of report and a short discussion piece it was simply not possible to explore the pros and cons of a home ownership culture in depth which seems to be where your concerns lie.

So a 24 hour news channel cannot find time to debate these issues, right. Why are they so superficial, why are these channels afraid to dig a little deeper? This is really the Brownite Broadcasting Corp.

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So a 24 hour news channel cannot find time to debate these issues, right. Why are they so superficial, why are these channels afraid to dig a little deeper? This is really the Brownite Broadcasting Corp.

I note that many on this site are cynical about the impartiality of the BBC. Is there an ombudsman or some other higher authority that people can complain to?

Billy Shears

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I note that many on this site are cynical about the impartiality of the BBC. Is there an ombudsman or some other higher authority that people can complain to?

The BBC Governors, who are symultaniously tasked with defending and criticising the self same organisation that pays their expenses :rolleyes:

Ofcom now have some limited powers when it comes to things like standards, many find the coverage of the housing market and their incestious relationship with the incumbent government pretty indecent.

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I note that many on this site are cynical about the impartiality of the BBC. Is there an ombudsman or some other higher authority that people can complain to? [billyShears]

For radio coverage one could contact Feedback:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/factual/feedback.shtml

Feedback is the programme where you determine the content.

Have you heard something on any of the BBC radio networks that's delighted or enraged you? Do you have comments on BBC policy or the future of radio? If so, drop Feedback a line.

Topics on the Feedback planning board this week:

[...snip...]

Complaints

Michael Grade, Chairman of the BBC says: "The real test of an organisation is how it deals with complaints from the public." Have you been happy with how the BBC dealt with your complaint? We'd like to hear about your experiences as this week Feedback will be interviewing BBC Governor Richard Tait, Chairman of the Programme Complaints Committee following an announcement of changes to the procedure.

This half-hour weekly programme usually includes a report where a listener gets to question BBC staff directly on an issue of concern.

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This half-hour weekly programme usually includes a report where a listener gets to question BBC staff directly on an issue of concern.

And they then spend half an hour dismissing and belittling people, it doesn't change anything and they never admit they're wrong, but I suppose it pays lip service to the proles. :lol:

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It seems clear that they'll always defend a one off piece that "hasn't got time to discuss the pros and cons... blah blah blah of home ownership".

So the issue is why as a corporation do they have so many programmes / articles that at best lean towards bullishness / getting on the ladder, and precisely none discussing STR, the benefits of renting etc.

It really is time for them to have an entire series dedicated to the realities of property ownership, AND RENTING.

It should show the property professionals, and the successful amateurs, and the happy renters (in nicer flats than their FTB in 2005 contemporaries), the repossessed, the people living in squalor who can't afford to maintain their "castle". Above all it should have a rational discussion of the economics, VIs, cycles, who benefits from rising prices, and that thing Dickens said about income / expenditure and how it related to MEWing.

It would be far more bullish than this site, but it would at least provide some balance.

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...

... I can assure you neither had any intention to "talk up

the market".

'Breakfast' offered a straightforward news report on the number of first

time buyers in the property market.

In addition there was a discussion with a first time buyer in a shared

ownership scheme - and a mortgage advisor.

...

The view expressed by Joanna Hayden Knowell later that it is still better

to buy than to rent was her own view, rather than that of the BBC, and no

doubt viewers can make up their own minds on the subject.

Great. So the BBC are impartial and any views expressed by their 'experts' are not endorsed by them. But just to be on the safe side, their 'experts' are VIs! Whatever happened to doing a bit of RESEARCH to find out what people are going to say to give a bit of balance to the discussion?

So, let's have a debate about whether Arsenal are a better team than Chelsea and invite Arsene Wenger, Ian Wright and Charlie George along for their views. But hey, any views they express are not endorsed by the BBC. 'No doubt viewers can make their own minds up on the subject.'

What a crock!

:angry:

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So...

....on the one hand we name and shame the "tax abuser of the week" who is paid out of public funds to fill a meaningless post

... but on the other, we are annoyed that the BBC doesn't employ an army of public servants to address overnight the needs of the green ink brigade.

Hmm...

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Isn't it obvious,

complain to the advertising standards agency,

after all, thats what a lot of these Brownite Bull Corporation reports are, simply advertisements for the building societies and estate agents.

other than the very basic news items, eg "earthquake in indonesia" or "plane flies into building" everything else is an advert for someone or another.

try sitting down to a full news bulletin and at the end of it analyze what you have learnt. usually very little. its simply evevator music with visual output.

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So...

....on the one hand we name and shame the "tax abuser of the week" who is paid out of public funds to fill a meaningless post

... but on the other, we are annoyed that the BBC doesn't employ an army of public servants to address overnight the needs of the green ink brigade.

The BBC isn't part of the government, they always say they're independent, that's why the ONS classify the licence as a 'tax' and why the Beeb always drags the government over the coals. *cough*.

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And they then spend half an hour dismissing and belittling people, it doesn't change anything and they never admit they're wrong, but I suppose it pays lip service to the proles. [buyingBear]

True, but an articulate HPCer would be able to bring the issue to the attention of other listeners.

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In the BBC reply, although they deny "talking up" the market and seem reather evasive about this whole issue, I'm pleased to notice that they don't disagree with FP's point of view and deny that there will be a substantial fall in prices!

They are obviously painfully aware that HPI is about to come to a sticky end!

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The view expressed by Joanna Hayden Knowell later that it is still better

to buy than to rent was her own view, rather than that of the BBC, and no

doubt viewers can make up their own minds on the subject.

However, I am sorry if you were concerned by the reporting that morning and

can assure you that your comments have been registered and added to our

daily log which is made available to programme makers and senior editorial

staff.

Thank you again for contacting the BBC.

Yours sincerely

Stewart McCullough

Divisional Advisor

BBC Information

Wouldn't it be jolly if instead of recording it in the day book to be buried forever in a sea of banal comments, they got an equal number of opinion analyists whose "own view" was balanced in the other direction? Fat chance, would be a fine thing.

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So a 24 hour news channel cannot find time to debate these issues, right. Why are they so superficial, why are these channels afraid to dig a little deeper? This is really the Brownite Broadcasting Corp.

Noam Chomsky, "America's most famous dissident", talks about this in the book of the documentary Manufacturing Consent : Noam Chomsky and the Media

Chomsky claims that the fast pace of rolling news is not so much a reaction to our ever decreasing attention spans, but a necessary invention to maintain the status quo by keeping the masses wedded to commonly accepted ideas.

Quite rightly he observes that presentation of the familiar in a 3 minute slot is easy. Presentation of alternative, radical views however always elicits questions such as "how can you say that," or requests such as "you'll need to prove that to me." Responding in a genuine, intelligent manner to these questions and requests invariably takes longer than 3 minutes. Thus the 3 minute slot never allows enough space for dissident or radical views to be expressed in any convincing manner: the establishment's argument wins before debate is even joined.

Thus "house prices will go up" fits the medium. "House prices are a function of sentiment, earnings, interest rates and social trends, and as such can go down," requires at least an hour.

Edited by Sledgehead

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I'm still waiting for an answers from the BBC to my previous complaints. I needed to prove my "serious allegations", of which I did.

I think i've been added to their anti spam filter!

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I'm still waiting for an answers from the BBC to my previous complaints. I needed to prove my "serious allegations", of which I did.

I think i've been added to their anti spam filter!

Well I've added them to mine, the Beeb is akin to the Court Jester, funny to watch but not to be taken seriously.

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  • 335 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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