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karhu

Just Heard. Powergen To Increase Gas Prices By 24.4%

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BBC website:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4758032.stm

Powergen in big energy price rise

The power company Powergen is putting up its gas prices by 24.4% and electricity prices by 18.4%.

It is the latest power supplier to announce big price increases in response to the rising wholesale price of gas.

Edited by karhu

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Electricity up 18.4% and gas up 24.4% - ouch!!! :o

Theres got to be people out there really struggling now, and you can only cope for so long when your outgoings start overtaking your income....

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When will these increases filter through into inflation figures, I wonder? Or perhaps more interestingly, how will they massage them away? <_<

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Just a thoughtette.

The energy bill across the whole of the Public Sector must be quite large.

I wonder what these increases translate into in terms of a tax increase to pay the bigger bill?

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Would be very interesting to know the exact percentage increases of:

- gas

- petrol

- electricity

- council tax

over the last few years.

Some people must really be feeling the pinch now.

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Just a thoughtette.

The energy bill across the whole of the Public Sector must be quite large.

I wonder what these increases translate into in terms of a tax increase to pay the bigger bill?

What if it goes the other way and results in a reduction in the number of civil servants?

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What if it goes the other way and results in a reduction in the number of civil servants?

What, reduce Empires!

More likely are reductions in numbers of teachers, nurses, carehome staff and others at the "front end".

I suspect a majority of Public Sector buildings are very energy inefficient but whether these price increases will spur efforts in that direction is debateable.

Capital versus Revenue expenditure being the problem I suppose.

Edited by Mushroom

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These increases will have the greatest effect not in increased domestic bills but in a reduction of new jobs created.

Any private company facing a 15% increase in overheads will be very reluctant to take on new staff for the coming year, and may even be forced to cut back. Energy intense industrial processes also look less financially viable.

You can be sure it’s not economic to mass produce very much in the UK any more. These rises make a small portion of the UK working population economically unviable whether they want to work or not.

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Where I work (Sheffield University) I was told yesterday that our electricity bill was up by £1.2million last year (from £6 million the previous year)... You can imagine a few other things get cut back with such a huge energy bill!

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These increases will have the greatest effect not in increased domestic bills but in a reduction of new jobs created.

Not to worry - new public sector jobs can be created instead! - Never mind the Gershon smokescreen, with its 80,000 public sector job cuts, these are balanced out by 80,000 new and wholly diffferent public sector appointments :-)

Plus the energy price rises wont appear as inflation when applied to public sector, as no doubt these costs will be 'off' Gordons books

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These increases will have the greatest effect not in increased domestic bills but in a reduction of new jobs created.

Any private company facing a 15% increase in overheads will be very reluctant to take on new staff for the coming year, and may even be forced to cut back. Energy intense industrial processes also look less financially viable.

You can be sure it’s not economic to mass produce very much in the UK any more. These rises make a small portion of the UK working population economically unviable whether they want to work or not.

True.

What annoys me is that in the mid 70s there was, in Milton Keynes if iirc, an exhibition of energy efficient houses and systems. These houses had been built by both the large firms and smaller ones.

We visited this and there were some good ideas. However in the intervening years I haven't noticed many of those ideas being incorporated into mass housing.

Back then the digital revolution hadn't happened so control systems were crude by comparison to what could be achieved today.

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Just a thoughtette.

The energy bill across the whole of the Public Sector must be quite large.

I wonder what these increases translate into in terms of a tax increase to pay the bigger bill?

Re-my argument about the inflationary impact of CouncilTax..........

Generally tax rises are not included in the inflation stats as they are merely a transfer of money form the taxpayer to the government .........In this case however council tax is rising primarily because of the increase in the cost of employing public sector workers......(pensions etc) ....

That is to say the service the binmen etc are providing has risen in price ....which is undoubtedly inflationary.....THE INFLATION STATS ARE FIDDLED!

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Re-my argument about the inflationary impact of CouncilTax..........

Generally tax rises are not included in the inflation stats as they are merely a transfer of money form the taxpayer to the government .........In this case however council tax is rising primarily because of the increase in the cost of employing public sector workers......(pensions etc) ....

That is to say the service the binmen etc are providing has risen in price ....which is undoubtedly inflationary.....THE INFLATION STATS ARE FIDDLED!

They are not fiddled. It's the wrong statistic to use for the long term good of the economy but it's not fiddled.

Edited by bandylegs

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Now is a good time to practice energy conservation, I think it is fairly obvious to us all that these cost look set to rise further over the coming decade and will probably accelerate as supplies continue to diminish. Is it time to install a coal fire?

With energy bills climbing over £1000 pa it is now wise to spend additional money on more efficient appliances.

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True.

What annoys me is that in the mid 70s there was, in Milton Keynes if iirc, an exhibition of energy efficient houses and systems. These houses had been built by both the large firms and smaller ones.

We visited this and there were some good ideas. However in the intervening years I haven't noticed many of those ideas being incorporated into mass housing.

Back then the digital revolution hadn't happened so control systems were crude by comparison to what could be achieved today.

I don't know if it was the 70s, but there is a street of such houses in an area called Kents Hill, I believe.

But, energy efficiency isn't really very much to do with controls, more to do with excellent insulation and air-tightness. Have a look at www.aecb.net (Association of Environmentally Conscious Builders), for example. Needless to say, insulation and air-tightness are still not done very well by our builders,

Peter.

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Nobody who's read this site regularly in recent months should be surprised by this. Peak oil is the headline issue, but peak everything else is on the horizon too. Gawd bless the free market and all who sale in her!

Speaking of which, now's a great time to invest in wooly jumper shares. Just don't ask me to share one with Giles Brandreth, ok?

Andrew McP

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Guest Guy_Montag

What, reduce Empires!

More likely are reductions in numbers of teachers, nurses, carehome staff and others at the "front end".

I suspect a majority of Public Sector buildings are very energy inefficient but whether these price increases will spur efforts in that direction is debateable.

Capital versus Revenue expenditure being the problem I suppose.

I work at a university, where we recently had a new building built for my department. The place is a disaster, firstly, despite being promised the same area as the old department (stupid in itself, it should have been larger to accomodate increased numbers of students & potential expansion of staff) it was 30% smaller. The build quality is crap, I mean shocking, there's not a straight line in the place, it's already subsiding so much the doors don't close properly (settling apparently).

After 18 months we finally got people round to fill in some of the worst holes, but the floors are still visably not level, and there is a roll of polythene sheeting kept on the top floor for when we get heavy rain.

The sad thing is it should have been a wonderful new building & it could have been if there had not been problems with the project manager provided by the university, the contractor and the sub-contractors. If any one of the three had been doing their job, we would be very lucky, as it is, for the life of this building (30 years in theory) it will be drafty, dangerous (the stairs are too narrow & some of the windows automatically open during a fire) and always in a position of repairs papering over the cracks (literally).

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Just a thoughtette.

The energy bill across the whole of the Public Sector must be quite large.

yes they are, The costs for the small area i manage has gone through the roof,

I'm been labeled as an Eco warror at work becuase I keep pushing for Energy Efficiency and self sufficiency,

At home I have almost halved my Electric bill and my Gas is down by 20%, I could go better too,

However I the gas bill savings are eaten up by the price increases,

Edited by Kam

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I was just in the hairdressers and the woman cutting my hair (who also owns the business) was moaning about how much her electricity and gas bills were this year.

I asked her why she thought they'd gone up.

"The electricity companies are taking the piss" she said.

Good news for Gordon Brown then.

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""In addition, we'll be investing billions of pounds in the UK over the coming years to help ensure that people's lights stay on and that their homes remain warm."

how?

"The money will be spent helping to improve the energy efficiency of half a million homes currently in, or at risk of, fuel poverty."

So not ensuring that there will always be gas and electric at all.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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