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laurejon

Sydney Boom On The Way

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Prices have been rising in Sydney recently.

And BTL is now on the boil yet again, I suspect we will be seeing something similar here very soon.

CSYDNEY is in the grip of a rental drought that is pushing up rents by as much as 5.5 per cent and inundating open inspections with scores of desperate tenants.

The number of vacant properties fell to a five-year low this month, and real estate experts warn that the drought will continue until the property market picks up.

They blame the squeeze on first-time buyers deciding to stay out of the market in the hope that prices will fall further, and a lack of new investment properties.

Figures from the Real Estate Institute of NSW show the vacancy rate fell to 2.1 per cent in Sydney, down 0.3 percentage points on February last year and 1.3 on February 2004. The middle ring of Sydney was hit hardest this month, with vacancy rates falling from 2.3 per cent in January to 1.7 per cent.

"There is not much to rent at all," said the institute's president, Cristine Castle. "Instead of having 10 or 15 properties, you have got two or three." Any figure below 2 per cent should set off "alarm bells", she said.

The situation is in stark contrast to the renters market of a few years ago when landlords used sweeteners of rent-free weeks and free appliances to lure tenants.

The NSW manager of Century 21, David Colman, said rentals were traditionally scarce in late summer, but this year was worse than usual.

His opposite number at RUN Property, Michael Conolly, said one open inspection in Woollahra this week had attracted more than 30 viewers. Units and houses in the inner west and North Shore attracted about three applications each, and other properties in the eastern suburbs between 8 and 10.

Between one and two applications per property was the norm, Mr Conolly said.

The squeeze on rentals has already driven prices up. Figures from the institute show rents rose most in inner Sydney, where the median price of three-bedroom properties jumped last year from $450 a week to $475.

Across Sydney the median rents of two-bedroom properties rose by $10 during the year. Mr Conolly said rentals in Crows Nest, Bondi Junction, Newtown and Coogee were the most popular and some parts of the inner-west were demanding $20 to $40 a week more for properties than they had in 2005.

"On some occasions we see people fighting for the property. They rush to get back and put a deposit down," he said.

Mr Colman blamed the problem on a lack of first-time buyers and said the situation would not improve until investors returned.

Ms Castle agreed, saying: "Whenever we sell an investment property it's not an investor buying it but a home owner, so there are less rentals." She warned that rents would continue to increase and if people wanted to avoid soaring prices "they should think about buying".

One prospective renter, Todd Sly, is already feeling the pressure. The 22-year-old has been looking for a two-bedroom apartment in the eastern suburbs for a month and has seen 15 so far.

Initially he expected to pay about $300 a week for a unit in Bondi Junction, Coogee or Centennial Park, but was now looking at between $350 and $400.

Mr Sly, who is lucky to be able to look midweek, said he shared most open inspections with between eight and 10 other hopefuls, and the competition was fierce. "If you see an older couple there, you think you're probably not in the running because they have probably both got jobs and are more stable as tenants in the eyes of the property agents."

Mr Sly has resorted to asking agents to alert him before properties come onto the market.

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The squeeze on rentals has already driven prices up. Figures from the institute show rents rose most in inner Sydney, where the median price of three-bedroom properties jumped last year from $450 a week to $475.

Across Sydney the median rents of two-bedroom properties rose by $10 during the year. Mr Conolly said rentals in Crows Nest, Bondi Junction, Newtown and Coogee were the most popular and some parts of the inner-west were demanding $20 to $40 a week more for properties than they had in 2005.

"On some occasions we see people fighting for the property. They rush to get back and put a deposit down," he said.

...

One prospective renter, Todd Sly, is already feeling the pressure. The 22-year-old has been looking for a two-bedroom apartment in the eastern suburbs for a month and has seen 15 so far.

Initially he expected to pay about $300 a week for a unit in Bondi Junction, Coogee or Centennial Park, but was now looking at between $350 and $400.

Mr Sly, who is lucky to be able to look midweek, said he shared most open inspections with between eight and 10 other hopefuls, and the competition was fierce. "If you see an older couple there, you think you're probably not in the running because they have probably both got jobs and are more stable as tenants in the eyes of the property agents."

Mr Sly has resorted to asking agents to alert him before properties come onto the market.

I am sorry. This is chicken sh!t rubbish. I was paying $100 per week for a room in Sydney back during the great rental squeeze of 1986. Back then the average wage was around 20,000. Now it is around 50,000. Numbers are still looking good to me.

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Last night on the ABC, (Australia's BBC). The finale of the evening news was this piece..... I can't be bothered tracking it down so you'll have to rely on my memory :)

"Real Estate is on the rise again, Darwin and Perth both show good increases, and Sydney rose 1% last year"

That was it, cut and fade to the ad's, then onto the next program......

WTF ???

I hear you guys in UK talking about biased reporting, V.I. and how the BBC is biased, and I always took it with a large grain of salt.

But Darwin and Perth are booming ???... Tell me about it, I'm in the same mining game that is driving that boom.....are there any other parts of Australia where mining and house prices are 'booming' ???

Then to attempt to tie the boom in Darwin and Perth to an effective loss in Sydney beggars belief. It wouldn't have seemed quite so bad, if they had tried to balance the statement ( couldn't call it a report ), with some opposing numbers.

As it was, all the nation got, was that Darwin, Perth and Sydney are all booming. Ergo real estate in general is booming.

I really do find that little article a bit of a worry.

Edited by Hino98

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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