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the neighbours on one side are noisiest bastards in the world.

loud music - computer games, banging, playing ball games inside, slambing doors. etc. no room in the house escapes from the noise.

If you complain they just multiply the noise by 10.

They bought it though a housing association. 50/50 ownership I think.

STR is not for me, moving to a detached house will cost many thousands and a lot of the money will be lost in the crash. I'd rather wait 2 years or more.

Estate agents fees £3K

stamp duty £2K

legal fees £1K

+ removal fees.

and that's just for a sideways move.

For £6K (or less) I was thinking of getting of getting a conservatory.

The noise wouldn't reach into there. would it?

I hope not.

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you wouldn't have to move to a detached house SK, you could sell up and move into a rental, and choose one that is specifically quiet and peaceful and has no noisy basta*d neighbours! I really don't see much option for you apart from moving; after all, who wants to feel like a prisoner in their own home?

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the neighbours on one side are noisiest bastards in the world.

loud music - computer games, banging, playing ball games inside, slambing doors. etc. no room in the house escapes from the noise.

If you complain they just multiply the noise by 10.

They bought it though a housing association. 50/50 ownership I think.

STR is not for me, moving to a detached house will cost many thousands and a lot of the money will be lost in the crash. I'd rather wait 2 years or more.

Estate agents fees £3K

stamp duty £2K

legal fees £1K

+ removal fees.

and that's just for a sideways move.

For £6K (or less) I was thinking of getting of getting a conservatory.

The noise wouldn't reach into there. would it?

I hope not.

6k will get you some soundproofing or a hit man.............

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the neighbours on one side are noisiest bastards in the world.

loud music - computer games, banging, playing ball games inside, slambing doors. etc. no room in the house escapes from the noise.

If you complain they just multiply the noise by 10.

They bought it though a housing association. 50/50 ownership I think.

STR is not for me, moving to a detached house will cost many thousands and a lot of the money will be lost in the crash. I'd rather wait 2 years or more.

Estate agents fees £3K

stamp duty £2K

legal fees £1K

+ removal fees.

and that's just for a sideways move.

For £6K (or less) I was thinking of getting of getting a conservatory.

The noise wouldn't reach into there. would it?

I hope not.

Er yes it would. In summer when you open your windows the problem also returns.

I moved last year for the same reason. Thumping gangsta rap into my children's life rattling the double glazing wasn't a sustainable option. You have 2 options. If you're going to stay, contact the Environmental Health noise pollution dept. They'll advise you but what you need is for them to install DAT time coded recording equipment which can be used in court. They'll only do this after a series of letters to the offending party. Consider the likely reaction of your dear neighbours. Also be aware that if you go down this route and you move, you'll have to declare the problem to future purchases. Don't even think about trying to get conceal it.

Option no.2 is move. You have my fullest sympathy believe me.

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Sorry but you have no choice but to move even if its just to rented. Reasons:-

1) You have the option to move, your neighbours (assuming its shared equity) don't.

2) longer ran this house is going to be worth less than a similar property outside a social housing area.

3) Unless suitable discounted its going to be very hard to sell.

4) Given that your neighbours are stuck there are they going to get better or worse down the years as their children get older.

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Sorry but you have no choice but to move even if its just to rented. Reasons:-

1) You have the option to move, your neighbours (assuming its shared equity) don't.

2) longer ran this house is going to be worth less than a similar property outside a social housing area.

3) Unless suitable discounted its going to be very hard to sell.

4) Given that your neighbours are stuck there are they going to get better or worse down the years as their children get older.

Why not remortgage as much money out of it for a deposit on a new place, and then rent it out to refugees. This will please next-door. Might make them realise what a pain they are being themselves.

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I lived in a ground floor apartment for 8 years and just loved it. Never heard noise from the basement flat. That is until a chap, early 40's moved in and that was it.

Everynight he would return from the nightclub around 3/4am and blast his music up and awake we were. He was just so ignorant but I am afraid there are many people like this.!. I had a 6 month old baby at the time and you could say both my husband and I got very stressed. We sold up in 2001. Thought about renting the flat out then as we were going to buy a house, now wish I had as it has doubled in price but you never know we could have had much grief from the tennants about the noise.!

I am afraid moving could be a solution.!

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I'm sure a few years ago, if you annoyed the neighbours with loud music, the Police came round and took away your stereo.

Now you have to call the 'Environmental Agency' 15 times, keep a log of the 'nuisance' (the thing stopping you living properly) , get physcially threatened because you keep call the Environmental Agency, and then get so fed up, you have to move out anyway. That's my experience - the flat below has housing association, with a violent tw*t into late 90s house music. Then someone else move in and goes through the same hell.

Pointless, and expensive. Typical New Labour.

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I'm sure a few years ago, if you annoyed the neighbours with loud music, the Police came round and took away your stereo.

Now you have to call the 'Environmental Agency' 15 times, keep a log of the 'nuisance' (the thing stopping you living properly) , get physcially threatened because you keep call the Environmental Agency, and then get so fed up, you have to move out anyway.    That's my experience - the flat below has housing association, with a violent tw*t  into late 90s house music.  Then someone else move in and goes through the same hell.

Pointless, and expensive.  Typical New Labour.

Can't disagree. That about sums up my experience. It took 1 year and a month to get it to court and an awful affect on our lives. Mind you the 'parents' did get fined £2,000 each. Which was nice.

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I won't be opening any windows in the conservatory in the summer. plus it's only temporary I hope.

When I stand in the garden now I never hear a sound, so as long as the sounds don't transfer down from the house brickwork to the consevatory brickwork/pvc then it should work ok.

You can get a small one for 3K. but you never get that back when you sell it, it just helps you to sell the house quicker. You might get a bit above market value because of it (maybe half of what you spent).

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I've got the same problem with students now on both sides. Your local Council should issue them with a Nuisance warning and can confisicate any musical equipment and fine them if they fail to comply.

You right to 'peaceful enjoyment of your own property' is enshrined in the European Convention On Human Rights - mention that to your local Council Environmental Health Department.

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I've got the same problem with students now on both sides. Your local Council should issue them with a Nuisance warning and can confisicate any musical equipment and fine them if they fail to comply.

You right to 'peaceful enjoyment of your own property' is enshrined in the European Convention On Human Rights - mention that to your local Council Environmental Health Department.

This is becoming a major problem for some people. What used to be good neighbourhoods are now looking pretty run down and shabby because tenants are moving into some of the houses and they just don't give a stuff about looking after the place.

They don't cut the lawns or clean the windows, they allow litter to blow around the garden, they dump broken cars in the drives, and they make a lot of noise.

On the flip side, OO'ers in the street can be a little 'snobby' about the tenants and this might cause the animosity, or it could just be that with OO'ers it's a case of once bitten twice shy.

But let’s face it, people buy a house, rather than rent, to get into better areas. The last thing that buyers want is the very people (sector of society) who they are trying to get away from, moving in next-door.

Whatever way you look at it, it's breaking down society and making us more divided.

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  • 442 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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